NSTA Engage: Spring21

May 12-8, 2021

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Rooms and times subject to change.
17 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

NMLSTA-Sponsored Session: Inspired by Germany—Understanding Global Climate Change to Take Local Action

Wednesday, April 21 • 4:00 PM - 4:45 PM


(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
2021 Climate Passport.pdf
https://sites.google.com/view/exploring-global-climates/home
Website link update.

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Explore global climate change data and human impacts using the Bremerhaven Klimahaus as a model to engage students in asking questions and taking local action.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Climate change impacts vary by location and disproportionately affect disadvantaged populations; 2. Individual actions have impacts on multiple scales from local to global; and 3. Empathetic, scientifically literate youth working in partnership with community members can be agents of change.

SPEAKERS:
Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ)

Data Puzzles: Bringing Authentic Data into Classrooms Through Inquiry-Based Instruction

Wednesday, April 21 • 7:00 PM - 7:45 PM


(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Data Puzzle resource list
Slide deck
Links to videos and interactives in speaker notes.

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Come learn about Data Puzzles, a free resource co-designed by climate scientists and instructional specialists from the University of Colorado Boulder that are aimed at bringing authentic data into classrooms in the context of current and relevant scientific research.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Introduction to inquiry-based instruction in the context of Ambitious Science Teaching practices; 2. Strategies for facilitating Data Puzzle resources and other inquiry-based activities in your MS/HS classroom; and 3. Skills to design your own data-driven learning activities.

SPEAKERS:
Jonathan Griffith (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, VT)

Science Storytelling: Student Activism Through Film

Thursday, April 22 • 6:45 PM - 7:30 PM


(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Science Storytelling Resources

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Help students create compelling stories about climate change and environmental justice. Classroom-ready resources will help students communicate scientific information with narrative structure across various media.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. In an analytical discipline like science, there is still a case to be made for storytelling; 2. The And-But-Therefore narrative structure technique to summarize scientific information or craft original science communication; and 3. Science storytelling can enhance student projects by improving conceptual understanding and allowing choice and voice to engage students as activists for environmental justice.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Tate (Whitehall Middle School: Whitehall, MI), Cristina Veresan (The Nueva School: Hillsborough, CA)

Earth Day: Sea Level Rise—What It Is; Why It’s Happening; Why It’s So Very, Very Dangerous; and What You Can Do About It

Thursday, April 22 • 6:45 PM - 7:30 PM


(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation Slides - Sea Level Rise
Sea Level Rise Education and Data Resources
These materials support the NOAA presentation - Sea Level Rise: What It Is; Why It’s Happening; Why It’s So Very, Very Dangerous; and What You Can Do About It!

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

This session engages participants in the exploration of middle school–oriented, classroom-ready, interactive, online, data-driven, three-dimensional activities and visualizations that present how sea level rise is caused by climate change, how NOAA monitors and measures these changes, how U.S. coastal regions are dangerously impacted by it, and how you can get up to $5,000 for your school to mitigate its impacts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will: 1. explore a middle school–oriented classroom-ready multimedia module, and use data-driven NOAA websites that explain and visualize how climate change is causing sea levels to rise globally and impacting all U.S. coastal areas; 2. explore NOAA’s classroom-ready, Data in the Classroom modules: Investigating Sea Level Using Real Data, and learn how their students can use data from NOAA’s satellites and coastal stations to do the analysis to see sea level changing, and learn how they can integrate its inquiry-based resources into their classrooms today; and 3. learn about NOAA Planet Stewards, a Federal program that offers educators up to $5,000 to engage in hands-on stewardship activities to mitigate climate change and its impacts.

SPEAKERS:
Bruce Moravchik (NOAA National Ocean Service: Silver Spring, MD)

Global Temperature Rise: Results from Most Recent Science

Saturday, April 24 • 4:30 PM - 5:15 PM

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Up-to-date scientific climate research will be explored as the basis for supporting NGSS performance expectation MS-ESS3-5 concerning the current rise in global temperature.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. There are many factors that affect changes in global temperature, both natural and human-caused; 2. The current rapid rise in global temperature is primarily the result of the human combustion of fossil fuels; and 3. There are many engaging sources of data and activities for students to use in investigating this NGSS performance expectation.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Wysession (Washington University in St. Louis: Saint Louis, MO)

NSTA Press Session: Fact or Phony? Successful Strategies to Promote Media Literacy

Saturday, April 24 • 5:30 PM - 6:15 PM


(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
materials for Fact or Phony

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Learn effective techniques, including Claims-Evidence-Reasoning, to help students navigate media filled with fictional information promoted as fact and cherry-picked data offered as evidence.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Teachers are provided with a checklist to assist their students in determining if information found on the internet is reputable, factual, and accurate; 2. Learn effective techniques to consider and understand why someone would believe common misconceptions about climate change and global warming; and 3. Participate in group discussions that take a deep dive into data to determine its relevance to a question or issue.

SPEAKERS:
Laura Tucker (Consultant: Port Townsend, WA), Lois Sherwood (Professional Development Coordinator: Port Townsend, WA)

What Is Making Your Neighborhood SO HOT? What Can YOU Do About It?

Tuesday, April 27 • 5:45 PM - 6:45 PM


(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Atmosphere Learning Progression 6-8 - Google Docs.pdf
Atmosphere Learning Progressions for grade 6-8 - connects NASA and GLOBE resources
Atmosphere Learning Progression 9-12 - Google Docs.pdf
Atmosphere Learning Progressions for grade 9-12- connects NASA and GLOBE resources
EOKids_Urban Heat Island.pdf
EO Kids: Urban Heat Islands: Hot Times in the City A copy has been uploaded.
GLOBE eTraining for Teachers.docx
Brief instructions on doing GLOBE eTrainings for the GLOBE protocols used in the Urban Heat Island-Surface Temperature Field campaign.
GLOBE eTraining teacher.pptx
Step-by-step instructions (with screenshots) on doing GLOBE eTrainings for the GLOBE protocols used in the Urban Heat Island-Surface Temperature Field campaign.
Guide to Using Google Forms with My NASA Data.pdf
Guide to using Google Forms with My NASA Data
https://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov/data-literacy-cubes-graphs-maps-and-data-tables
My NASA Data : Data Literacy Cubes
https://observer.globe.gov/about/get-the-app
Information on the using the GLOBE Observer App
https://www.txstate-epdc.net/event-post/
NASA EPDC Webinars Webinars on a variety of topics
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnBO4vX82Fs
NASA Video on Urban Heat Islands
NSTA Exploring Urban Heat Islands with My NASA Data_Story Maps.pdf
NSTA - Story MapsPresentation in pdf
the heat is On Urban Heat Islands, Defection Strategies, Mitigation Solutions
Lesson Plan developed by Elizabeth Sebastian NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Dr. Czajkowski, lead scientist on urban heat islands, engages students to study their local environments by studying the surface temperatures of their neighborhoods. Learn how to integrate this into your classrooms by using My NASA Data’s story map and NASA satellite data.

Materials required:

In the session, each participant will download the Globe Observer App (presenters will help with any technical problems participants' may have).

The participants will be asked to go outside and looks at the clouds in their area. The clouds' data is tied to the Urban Heat Island Effect.

This session is targeted for novice attendees.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Engage students in studying the heat islands in their neighborhoods; 2. Access, download, and compare their data to NASA satellite data; and 3. Interact with My NASA Data Urban Heat Island Story Map, which can be imported to their Google classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Janet Struble (The University of Toledo: Toledo, OH), Kevin Czajkowski (The University of Toledo: Toledo, OH)

NESTA and CLEAN 2: How to Teach with Climate Data and Tools

Tuesday, April 27 • 5:45 PM - 6:45 PM


(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NESTA & CLEAN 2: Climate Data Tools
NESTA & CLEAN 2: Climate Data Tools Landing Page
All links shared in presentation can be found in this resource

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Experience tools and data sources that help learners connect climate science content to local and global phenomena.

Note: Attendees will need the ability to stay in the virtual session while exploring new tools online simultaneously, so split-screens or multiple monitors would be helpful but are not required. Presenters will not have the ability to correct internet issues or the inability of attendees to access resources presented that might arise due to time limitation. So please keep in mind firewalls and administrative privileges before the session.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will: 1. walk away with peer- and science-reviewed resources they can immediately integrate into their teaching; 2. walk away with strategies for engaging students in collaborative explorations of climate data; and 3. experience materials as learners that help make thinking visible.

SPEAKERS:
Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), Jessica Bean (University of California, Berkeley: Berkeley, CA), Mark Chandler (Columbia University: New York, NY), Louise Huffman (U.S. Ice Drilling Program: Hanover, NH), Cory Forbes (University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Lincoln, NE)

Wildfires, Drought, and the Future of Forests

Wednesday, April 28 • 4:00 PM - 4:45 PM


(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Future of Forests resource list

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Across the western United States, wildfires are burning more and more of the landscape. In the NASA-funded "Future of Forests" curriculum, tied to NGSS Life Science standards, students engage with online mapping tools and authentic datasets to discover how landscapes recover after wildfires.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Introduction to the model-based inquiry instructional framework designed around the construction, revision, and testing of explanatory models; 2. Strategies to implement the NASA-funded "Future of Forests" MS/HS curriculum tied to NGSS Life Science standards; and 3. Skills to connect unit to the GLOBE citizen science protocols.

SPEAKERS:
Jonathan Griffith (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, VT)

Data Puzzles: Bringing Authentic Data into Classrooms Through Inquiry-Based Instruction

Wednesday, April 28 • 6:00 PM - 6:45 PM

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Come learn about Data Puzzles, a free resource co-designed by climate scientists and instructional specialists from the University of Colorado Boulder that are aimed at bringing authentic data into classrooms in the context of current and relevant scientific research.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Introduction to inquiry-based instruction in the context of Ambitious Science Teaching practices; 2. Strategies for facilitating Data Puzzle resources and other inquiry-based activities in your MS/HS classroom; and 3. Skills to design your own data-driven learning activities.

SPEAKERS:
Jonathan Griffith (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, VT)

NSTA Press Session: Fact or Phony? Successful Strategies to Promote Media Literacy

Wednesday, April 28 • 6:00 PM - 6:45 PM


(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Materials used in our session

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Learn effective techniques, including Claims-Evidence-Reasoning, to help students navigate media filled with fictional information promoted as fact and cherry-picked data offered as evidence.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Teachers are provided with a checklist to assist their students in determining if information found on the internet is reputable, factual, and accurate; 2. Learn effective techniques to consider and understand why someone would believe common misconceptions about climate change and global warming; and 3. Participate in group discussions that take a deep dive into data to determine its relevance to a question or issue.

SPEAKERS:
Lois Sherwood (Professional Development Coordinator: Port Townsend, WA), Laura Tucker (Consultant: Port Townsend, WA)

With Liberty and Justice for All: A Climate Perspective

Wednesday, April 28 • 7:00 PM - 7:45 PM


(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
CLEO Institute links and resources
CLEO Institute links and resources
This handout provides links to the CLEO Institute's no-cost programs for teachers and other resources referenced in the presentation.

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

The Climate Resilient Schools program developed by The CLEO Institute brings vetted climate science into classrooms with an emphasis on equity, justice, advocacy, and empowerment.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Students are eager to learn about climate issues and many feel that it is not being adequately addressed in their general curriculum. Building climate literacy in both students and teachers creates a more robust learning experience that prepares students for future challenges; 2. Teachers play a key role in bringing climate action into the community. There should be a focus on solutions, both technological and societal, as well as environmental issues. This leads to higher engagement from students who feel empowered to take action; and 3. Materials should follow the latest scientific consensus to provide the most up-to-date information and follow standards such as the ACE (Action for Climate Empowerment) Framework and NGSS.

SPEAKERS:
Julieta Rodrigo (The CLEO Institute: Miami, FL), Karolyn Burns (The CLEO Institute: Tallahassee, FL)

Science Storytelling: Student Activism Through Film

Wednesday, April 28 • 7:00 PM - 7:45 PM


(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Science Storytelling Resources

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Help students create compelling stories about climate change and environmental justice. Classroom-ready resources will help students communicate scientific information with narrative structure across various media.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. In an analytical discipline like science, there is still a case to be made for storytelling; 2. The And-But-Therefore narrative structure technique to summarize scientific information or craft original science communication; and 3. Science storytelling can enhance student projects by improving conceptual understanding and allowing choice and voice to engage students as activists for environmental justice.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Tate (Whitehall Middle School: Whitehall, MI), Cristina Veresan (The Nueva School: Hillsborough, CA)

Empower Environmental Changemakers with Soil Quest’s Action Project to Sequester Carbon and Reduce Climate Change

Wednesday, April 28 • 7:00 PM - 7:45 PM


(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Instructional Storyline - Soil Quest.pdf
This storyline pdf describes what happens on each of the Quest's webpages, and offers additional instructional ideas.
Project Hero's Soil Quest (Captain Planet Foundation)
Our session will explore how you can use this Quest as a local action PBL experience. It was developed in collaboration with Kiss the Ground.
Soil QUEST Overview.pdf

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Using Project Hero’s online Soil Quest and Q-U-E-S-T framework, guide learners to design projects that sequester carbon, restore soil’s health, and slow climate change.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will: 1. work with the online PBL Soil Quest platform (https://herofortheplanet.org/healthysoils) as a model for empowering students to use the understanding of science concepts to design and carry out a solution to a local soil problem; 2. understand how to teach the connection between soil-carbon-climate change concepts through Quest activities and investigations (aligned to the NGSS), and lay the foundation for designing and carrying out this project; and 3. gather ideas for how the soil project, and lessons for supporting concepts, could fit into current NGSS-focused curricula (i.e., concepts around healthy soil ecosystems, carbon cycle and sequestration, climate change, and design of conventional and regenerative farming and gardening practices), and connect to the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

SPEAKERS:
Laura Arndt (Global GreenSTEM: Franktown, CO)

Teaching Climate Science in a High School Chemistry Class

Thursday, April 29 • 5:30 PM - 6:15 PM

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Ideas will be presented for how best to use climate science phenomena to anchor storylines of instruction in high school chemistry classes.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. High school chemistry class is a good place for students to learn about climate science, which appears prominently in NGSS high school performance expectations; 2. Climate-related phenomena can effectively engage students and anchor chemistry topic storylines; and 3. Many good examples from climate science exist, easily explored through student activities, for use as anchoring phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Wysession (Washington University in St. Louis: Saint Louis, MO)

Beyond Polar Bears: Disproportionate Impact of Climate Change on Low-Income and Marginalized Communities’ Health

Saturday, May 1 • 3:30 PM - 4:15 PM


(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Beyond Polar Bears slides

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Critical examination of public social and scientific data resources will provoke awareness of the legacy of bias, as well as identify mitigation and reparation activities.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Due to legacy of bias, as reflected in the redlining of urban communities in the early 20th century, extreme heat events associated with climate change have a disproportionate impact on low-income and marginalized urban communities; 2. This legacy can be integrated into NGSS ESS activities thanks to publicly available digital social and scientific data; and 3. Science knowledge coupled with a value for justice can orient and inform students and teachers to make decisions and identify mitigation (e.g. changing surface material and/or color) and reparation activities (orienting efforts toward low-income and marginalized communities). A virtual national network of NSTA members can advance this work.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Meabh Kelly (University of Connecticut: Storrs Mansfield, CT), Michelle Ellis (Hunter Huss High School: Gastonia, NC)

Helping Students Become Explorers Through Modeling, Mapping, and Service Learning

Saturday, May 8 • 4:30 PM - 5:15 PM

STRAND: Climate Justice and Climate Science

Show Details

Engage students in building scientific models, mapping, and service learning to explore climate change phenomena while inspiring them to take action.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Discover how to integrate, develop, and use scientific modeling to promote 3-D learning as the means to explore the phenomena of climate change as identified in the ESS NGSS; 2. Explore how to integrate maps to promote 3-D learning of climate change and environmental justice phenomena; and 3. Take a step further in 3-D teaching by offering students opportunities to propose a solution to address a local problem in connection to core ideas learned in class.

SPEAKERS:
Dr. Yajaira Fuentes-Tauber (Rocky Mountain High School: No City, No State)

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