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NSTA Engage: Spring21 - Sessions

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Thursday, April 22
6:45 PM - 7:30 PM
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Science Storytelling: Student Activism Through Film

Help students create compelling stories about climate change and environmental justice. Classroom-ready resources will help students communicate scientific information with narrative structure across various media.

Takeaways: 1. In an analytical discipline like science, there is still a case to be made for storytelling; 2. The And-But-Therefore narrative structure technique to summarize scientific information or craft original science communication; and 3. Science storytelling can enhance student projects by improving conceptual understanding and allowing choice and voice to engage students as activists for environmental justice.

Speakers

Susan Tate (Whitehall Middle School: Whitehall, MI), Cristina Veresan (The Nueva School: Hillsborough, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Science Storytelling Resources

Saturday, April 24
5:30 PM - 6:15 PM
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Empowering Effective Climate Change Communicators

Learn how to navigate the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication's Educator Page. Engage with data-based, NGSS-focused activities that you can easily use with students.

Takeaways: 1. Communicating effectively about climate change is just as important as understanding climate science itself if we hope to realize viable, equitable climate solutions in our lifetime; 2. The Yale Program on Climate Change Communication conducts scientific research on public climate change knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Through YPCCC's Educator Page, students can engage with current data from this research to identify effective climate change communication strategies and think critically about what it takes to implement climate action; and 3. Students are a critical audience to engage in the work to find and enact climate solutions. The activities on the Educator Page can help students develop a sense of agency around climate change communication while honing important NGSS-related skills.

Speakers

Ruthie Gold (Yale Program on Climate Change Communication: New Haven, CT)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://climatecommunication.yale.edu/for-educators/

Wednesday, April 28
5:00 PM - 5:45 PM
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Salmon and the Yurok Nation: Grounding Science Learning in Socially Conscious Solutions to Design Challenges

Workshop examining the integration of engineering design challenges and culturally responsive pedagogy into a three-dimensional NGSS ecological justice storyline to support equity.

Takeaways: 1. Introduce a storyline that addresses an issue of environmental justice using science and engineering practices, culminating in a problem-based design solution; 2. Explore strategies for leveraging the critical connections between cultural and socioeconomic issues, science, and engineering to best support inquiry and investigation in the science classroom; and 3. Support teachers in developing students’ agency to explain, advocate for, and design solutions to environmental justice issues.

Speakers

Allison Grecco (Mather High School: Chicago, IL), Amber Luczak (John Marshall Metropolitan High School: Chicago, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Student Artifacts
Presentation Slides

Wednesday, April 28
7:00 PM - 7:45 PM
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With Liberty and Justice for All: A Climate Perspective

The Climate Resilient Schools program developed by The CLEO Institute brings vetted climate science into classrooms with an emphasis on equity, justice, advocacy, and empowerment.

Takeaways: 1. Students are eager to learn about climate issues and many feel that it is not being adequately addressed in their general curriculum. Building climate literacy in both students and teachers creates a more robust learning experience that prepares students for future challenges; 2. Teachers play a key role in bringing climate action into the community. There should be a focus on solutions, both technological and societal, as well as environmental issues. This leads to higher engagement from students who feel empowered to take action; and 3. Materials should follow the latest scientific consensus to provide the most up-to-date information and follow standards such as the ACE (Action for Climate Empowerment) Framework and NGSS.

Speakers

Julieta Rodrigo (The CLEO Institute: Miami, FL), Karolyn Burns (The CLEO Institute: Tallahassee, FL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

CLEO Institute links and resources
This handout provides links to the CLEO Institute's no-cost programs for teachers and other resources referenced in the presentation.
CLEO Institute links and resources

Wednesday, April 28
7:00 PM - 7:45 PM
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Science Storytelling: Student Activism Through Film

Help students create compelling stories about climate change and environmental justice. Classroom-ready resources will help students communicate scientific information with narrative structure across various media.

Takeaways: 1. In an analytical discipline like science, there is still a case to be made for storytelling; 2. The And-But-Therefore narrative structure technique to summarize scientific information or craft original science communication; and 3. Science storytelling can enhance student projects by improving conceptual understanding and allowing choice and voice to engage students as activists for environmental justice.

Speakers

Susan Tate (Whitehall Middle School: Whitehall, MI), Cristina Veresan (The Nueva School: Hillsborough, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Science Storytelling Resources

Wednesday, April 28
7:00 PM - 7:45 PM
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Empower Environmental Changemakers with Soil Quest’s Action Project to Sequester Carbon and Reduce Climate Change

Using Project Hero’s online Soil Quest and Q-U-E-S-T framework, guide learners to design projects that sequester carbon, restore soil’s health, and slow climate change.

Takeaways: Participants will: 1. work with the online PBL Soil Quest platform (https://herofortheplanet.org/healthysoils) as a model for empowering students to use the understanding of science concepts to design and carry out a solution to a local soil problem; 2. understand how to teach the connection between soil-carbon-climate change concepts through Quest activities and investigations (aligned to the NGSS), and lay the foundation for designing and carrying out this project; and 3. gather ideas for how the soil project, and lessons for supporting concepts, could fit into current NGSS-focused curricula (i.e., concepts around healthy soil ecosystems, carbon cycle and sequestration, climate change, and design of conventional and regenerative farming and gardening practices), and connect to the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Speakers

Laura Arndt (Global GreenSTEM: Franktown, CO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Soil QUEST Overview.pdf
Project Hero's Soil Quest (Captain Planet Foundation)
Our session will explore how you can use this Quest as a local action PBL experience. It was developed in collaboration with Kiss the Ground.
Instructional Storyline - Soil Quest.pdf
This storyline pdf describes what happens on each of the Quest's webpages, and offers additional instructional ideas.

Saturday, May 1
3:30 PM - 4:15 PM
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Beyond Polar Bears: Disproportionate Impact of Climate Change on Low-Income and Marginalized Communities’ Health

Critical examination of public social and scientific data resources will provoke awareness of the legacy of bias, as well as identify mitigation and reparation activities.

Takeaways: 1. Due to legacy of bias, as reflected in the redlining of urban communities in the early 20th century, extreme heat events associated with climate change have a disproportionate impact on low-income and marginalized urban communities; 2. This legacy can be integrated into NGSS ESS activities thanks to publicly available digital social and scientific data; and 3. Science knowledge coupled with a value for justice can orient and inform students and teachers to make decisions and identify mitigation (e.g. changing surface material and/or color) and reparation activities (orienting efforts toward low-income and marginalized communities). A virtual national network of NSTA members can advance this work.

Speakers

Susan Meabh Kelly (University of Connecticut: Storrs Mansfield, CT), Michelle Ellis (Hunter Huss High School: Gastonia, NC)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Beyond Polar Bears slides