NASCAR 2022-23
 

2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 27 results

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Increasing Scientific Literacy: Strategies, Free Activities, and Resources That Work!

McCormick Place - W178a

Participants will learn strategies and receive numerous resources that increase students’ scientific literacy. The hands-on approach has participants engaged in the activities, games, and more.

Takeaways: Attendees will: 1. learn new strategies for incorporating scientific literacy into their lessons; and 2. receive numerous activities, templates, games, and other resources to help with doing this. These resources can be used “as is” or modified to allow for differentiation based on the needs of the learners. Strategies and resources will include ones effective with ELL and EC students.

Speakers

Iris Mudd (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools: Winston Salem, NC)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Now I see it! Now I get it!

McCormick Place - W184d

Without out a doubt the recent pandemic has demonstrated that, the efforts in the science classroom towards scientific literacy are more relevant than ever. In this session participants will learn simple effective visual literacy tools and strategies that make learning science visible to all students, supporting diversity and reinforcing scientific literacy skills that help students make sense of the world. The strategies and tools used in this presentation will highlight the need to incorporate visual literacy as current brain research shows that around 60% of information we process every day comes in visual form. Sometimes chunking content to smaller learning bites can lower the understanding of concepts and ideas, especially if these concepts are abstract in nature; learning how to maximize the use of visuals both student and teacher made supports deeper understanding not just on a particular concept but of how they are connected making sense of the world. These strategies support cultural competency as they support learner diversity while working on scientific literacy skills such as use of evidence/data, pose questions, find answers. By having a common visual as point of reference along with strategy and tools not only closes the gap on background knowledge and makes accessible to all students but also helps student and teachers have meaningful discourse highlighting students strengths to solve real world problems.

Takeaways: In this session participants will learn simple effective visual literacy tools and strategies that make learning science visible to all students, supporting diversity and reinforcing scientific literacy skills that help students make sense of the world.

Speakers

Marjorie Miles Dozier (Polk County Public Schools: Bartow, FL)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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What Is Sensemaking? Exploration and Consensus-Building Tasks for Individuals and Teams

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Join us to learn what sensemaking is and how to use research-based resources to engage students in making sense of the world around them. Leave with a collection of resources to move your professional learning forward no matter where you are on the sensemaking continuum.

Takeaways: Develop an understanding of what sensemaking is and how it can help build classrooms where students are able to make sense of the world around them. Leaders walk away with a consensus-building exercise for their team.

Speakers

Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Elizabeth Allan (University of Central Oklahoma: Edmond, OK)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Half-Earth Project Inclusive Mapping Design Challenge and Hummingbird Guided Inquiry

McCormick Place - W196a

The Half-Earth Project team-based Mapping Design Challenge engages students in authentic teamwork to use digital mapping to design their own biodiversity conservation choices.

Takeaways: Digital mapping motivated by exploring charismatic species draws diverse students into the multidisciplinary science of conservation decision-making where species, human impacts, and stakeholders have to be considered.

Speakers

Dennis Liu (E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation: Durham, NC)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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3D@NSTA: Strengthening Science Teaching Practice with CCCs

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

In this session, the co-editors of the recent NSTA Press book, Crosscutting Concepts: Strengthening Science and Engineering Learning, will take a deep dive into how crosscutting concepts can be more explicitly leveraged to strengthen science instruction. Presenters will illustrate how two instructional units—one elementary and one secondary—have developed CCCs as lenses on phenomena in order to better connect with students’ everyday experiences and to enhance students’ ability to meaningfully integrate SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs to make sense of authentic phenomena and problems.

Takeaways: CCCs are: 1) lenses on phenomena and problems; 2) critical to sensemaking about phenomena and problems; and 3) most useful when meaningfully integrated with SEPs and DCIs.

Speakers

Jeff Nordine (The University of Iowa: Iowa City, IA), Okhee Lee (New York University: New York, NY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA 2022 CCCs in 3D Learning PPT 7-21-22.pptx

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Lone Wolf: A Darwinian Speculative Thought Experiment

McCormick Place - W186a

Come join us as we participate in a Darwinian speculation reimagined as a Thought Experiment. This is a classic STEAM approach.

Takeaways: See how to integrate the arts into STEM = STEAM.

Speakers

Christina Derusha (Science Teacher: , IL), Vito Dipinto (National Louis University at Wheeling: Wheeling, IL)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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DCI, CCC, and SEPs, Oh My! Sweet and Salty Investigations with a 3-D Twist!

McCormick Place - W176c

Discover how to implement three-dimensional learning into any science curriculum, all while engaging learners to become phenomenal!

Takeaways: How to use SEPs to drive student instruction and molecular-level modeling of processes using data to support claim.

Speakers

Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

DCI, CCC, and SEPs Oh My! (2).pdf

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Science in Action: Updating the Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project Educators’ Guide

McCormick Place - W181a

Marine debris is a widespread pollution problem in our ocean and waterways. It can harm wildlife, habitats, and our economy. This issue is human-caused, but it also has human solutions. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Debris Program is dedicated to better understanding and preventing marine debris and its impacts on our environment. One of the best tools we have to combat marine debris is understanding the distribution, abundance, and types of debris in the marine environment. The Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project (MDMAP) is a NOAA citizen science initiative to survey and record marine debris on shorelines. By participating in the MDMAP, students can generate critical data on marine debris for use by community organizations, policymakers, researchers, and NOAA. MDMAP data can also support student-generated action projects, providing opportunities to plan and implement authentic changemaking efforts. The NOAA Marine Debris Program plans to demonstrate and solicit feedback on an updated tool to support implementation of the MDMAP protocols with students: The MDMAP Educators’ Guide (Guide). We will introduce the updated protocols, provide a demonstration of activities in the Guide, and engage in a discussion with educators about implementation, suggested extensions (including action projects), and feedback.

Takeaways: Attendees at this session will learn about the updated Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project Educators’ Guide: a refreshed citizen science tool for monitoring shoreline marine debris available from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, including planning and conducting protocols with students, working with survey data, and creating authentic, meaningful action projects for students based on their experiences.

Speakers

Alexandria Brake (NOAA Office of Education: Silver Spring, MD), Tanya Kea-Marie Torres (California Sea Grant Marine Debris Extension Fellow: , CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation Slides
Guide to NOAAs MDMAP for Educators (DRAFT ONLY)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Solving Environmental Issues Through Civic Action, Invention and Primary Sources

McCormick Place - W194a

Identifying problems, and complaining about them, is a talent many might claim. Identifying a problem and creating a solution is much less common but remains a core scientific principle needed to help students change the world. Finding a solution, however, is not enough; there must be an implementation plan as well. Scientific literacy teaches students to pinpoint and explore problems, but they must also take civic action--beginning in their own backyards. This session will introduce primary source-based inquiry learning tools by PBS NewsHour Classroom and Indiana University’s Center on Representative Government to help teachers meet this need. The workshop will consist of two NGSS-aligned activities on the connection between the environment and civic action.

Takeaways: How to engage students in identifying environmental phenomena in their own backyards and how to take action to address it.

Speakers

Elizabeth Osborn (Indiana University Bloomington: Bloomington, IN), Victoria Pasquantonio (PBS NewsHour: Arlington, VA)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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The Shape of Stories: An SEL Introduction to Data Visualization

McCormick Place - W183c

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to the work of Kurt Vonnegut who argued that stories have shapes that can be graphed. They will explore different ways of graphing simple stories and how this technique can be used at all grade levels to introduce data visualization. Participants will also see examples of story graphs from different perspectives and discuss how this can be used as a tool to teach students about data representation and interpretation. Following the introduction, participants will engage in a story graphing activity, creating a graph of their own story and sharing it with another participant. We will then reflect on this experience and discuss how the activity can be used in the context of social emotional learning with both students and educators. Participants will then explore story graphing and data visualization resources and discuss how they might use these resources to address specific STEM topics or to integrate multiple content areas such as math, science, and art in their classrooms.

Takeaways: Learn how to introduce graphing and data visualization using stories and how this strategy can be used in connection with social emotional learning to engage and empower educators and students.

Speakers

Anna Babarinde (Sonoma County Office of Education: Santa Rosa, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

The Shape of Stories An SEL Introduction to Data Visualization.pdf

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Equilibrium Misconceptions Are Best Resolved By Inquiry!

McCormick Place - W196c

Chemical equilibrium is a central topic to the understanding of both Chemistry and Biology-yet students have many misconceptions about equilibrium. The NGSS standard HS PS1-6 covers this important topic. In a recent AP Chemistry Exam, the vast majority of students did poorly on the topic of had misconceptions about equilibrium-73 % of the students received a zero or had no response to the equilibrium question. Students are most familiar with equilibrium problems and experiments where the K value is small-usually less than 1. This AP Exam question dealt with a large K value causing the majority of students to do poorly. In this presentation, participants will take part in a “hands on” inquiry activity using appropriate technology to collect and analyze data for a chemical equilibrium having a large K value. Participants will: undertake a “hands on” equilibrium Inquiry with a large K value, use Inquiry to resolve equilibrium misconceptions, & use appropriate technology for data collection/analysis. Join this workshop to take an inquiry lab back to use in your classroom. Handouts will be provided. There will be time allotted for participant questions.

Takeaways: Participants will learn to use Inquiry to overcome student misconceptions about chemical equilibrium.

Speakers

Gregory Dodd (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Pennsboro, WV)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Copper, An Essential Metal: A Two Unit Inquiry!

McCormick Place - W196c

Copper is used in plumbing, coinage, and electrical wiring; yet we often take this element for granted. Copper has been known since at least 9000 BC, but many of its reactions and properties have only been determined in recent centuries. This inquiry requires students to: research the chemical reactions of copper (redox, double displacement, and decomposition), apply prior knowledge of stoichiometry and conservation of matter, analyze a copper solution using spectroscopy, and use proper laboratory techniques and skills. NGSS standards HS PS1-2, HS PS1-5, and HS PS1-7 will be addressed. Participants will: Research and design an Inquiry experiment, use technology to collect/analyze data, & visualize what occurs on the submicroscopic level by employing particulate drawings. Join this workshop to take home a two-unit inquiry lab to use in your classroom. This Inquiry is a perfect end-of-course lab practical. There will be time allotted for participant questions. Handouts will be provided.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how Inquiry can be used successfully in their classroom.

Speakers

Gregory Dodd (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Pennsboro, WV)

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Problem Centered Teaching by Tomorrow

McCormick Place - W193a

Problem centered instruction is a great way to engage students, integrate content, inspire learning, and naturally incorporate all three dimensions of the NRC Framework. However, true problem centered instruction requires a major shift in both teaching and learning, requiring the one thing teachers don't have: time--the last thing teachers need is another pedagogical strategy that disrupts their entire routine. Teachers will have the opportunity to voice their concerns and discuss some barriers of problem centered teaching and learning, while also addressing the benefits for both teachers and students. Considering the benefits, there are some immediate changes that teachers can use to help shift to a problem centered environment. Recalling that problem centered learning should be complex, meaningful, and open-ended, the four strategies are: 1) Make the Content Relatable, 2) Structure: Less is More, 3) Be a Resource, Not an Answer Key, and 4) Use a Problem to Introduce a Topic. Teachers will then have an opportunity to put the strategies to immediate use by picking a lesson or topic and work with others to transform it into a three-dimensional, problem centered lesson.

Takeaways: Teachers will explore four strategies that promote three-dimensional learning through the process of problem centered instruction that is complex, meaningful, and open-ended. They will discuss benefits and barriers to the problem centered approach from the perspective of both the instructor and the learner. Teachers will have an opportunity to brainstorm and work collaboratively on transforming a lesson or topic of their choice into a problem centered, reality based scenario that seamlessly integrates the Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas.

Speakers

Cassandra Armstrong (Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy: Aurora, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation Link

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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How do science teachers stay effective? Practical implications and strategies based on research

McCormick Place - W176c

This presentation will use a mixture of hands-on activities and discussion questions to engage participants in the themes from research about how science teachers stay effective during challenging times For example, through our research, we have found science teachers often have a strong desire to help their students become better people and create an equitable classroom. They describe that they have goals for their students such as being critical thinkers, problem-solvers, creative, and collaborative. Our session will work to have the participants generate the types of attributes they want in their own students. We will then demonstrate two teaching scenarios: one based on best practices in science education and the other being a teacher-centered approach. We will have participants then analyze the teaching scenarios using the goals they have to determine which has more culturally responsive teaching practices. We will also engage students in a hands-on activity using a gravity well that connects to MS-PS2-4. We will use the activity to discuss culturally responsive teaching practices in science teaching including scaffolding, effective questioning, a method to analyze teaching, and using experiences and phenomena to help students deeply engage in all three dimensions of the NGSS.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about inclusive teaching strategies that help science teachers stay effective.

Speakers

Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Creating phenomena for YOUR students

McCormick Place - W178b

The use of natural phenomena and driving questions to motivate student learning are key in the NGSS. With so many different science phenomena being posted for use in the classroom it can be difficult to determine what makes a good phenomenon and if that phenomena would be appropriate in all educational settings. The focus of this hands-on workshop is to give science teachers the tools needed to find, evaluate and use phenomena and driving questions for Performance Expectations that are consistent with the culture of their classroom. We will first explore and evaluate different phenomena used to teach the NGSS from various sources (websites, kits, science texts). Then we will apply cognitive learning theory and practices to those same phenomena and evaluate them considering different classroom cultures. Finally, participants will choose and discourse about alternative phenomena which might be used given different classroom cultures. The ultimate goal is to help science teachers evaluate and choose phenomena and create driving questions which can drive excellent science pedagogy in THEIR classrooms.

Takeaways: Science phenomena and driving questions need to be tailored to the real-world of students in YOUR classroom

Speakers

Rob Keys (Cornerstone University: Grand Rapids, MI)

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Transformative Science Education: Enrich Your Students’ Lives with Science

McCormick Place - W193a

Unfortunately, the Las Vegas slogan “What Happens Here Stays Here” applies all too well to science classrooms. Science learning that takes place in the classroom often stays in the classroom and fails to transform students’ perceiving and experiencing of the world. This gap between school learning and everyday experience is one of the key barriers to developing active scientific literacy. This workshop on the Teaching for Transformative Experiences in Science (TTES) model will help teachers address this problem by enacting transformative teaching. The TTES model is a research-based pedagogy for fostering transformative experiences; that is, experiences in which students use science content to enrich and expand their everyday lives. The workshop will train teachers in the application of three core design principles: (a) artistic selection and crafting of content, (b) experiential apprenticeship, and (c) doing and undergoing. The workshop will be conducted by one of the pioneers and lead researchers of transformative experience theory. It will include authentic classroom vignettes illustrating the design principles in action, application templates and guidelines, and exercises that will help participants master the design principles. The workshop is appropriate for science educators at all levels as the design principles are adaptable to all ages.

Takeaways: Workshop participants will receive hands-on training in research-based strategies effective at fostering transformative experiences; that is, experiences in which students use their in-school learning to enrich and expand their everyday, out-of-school lives.

Speakers

Kevin Pugh (University of Northern Colorado: Greeley, CO)

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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People to Ponder: Using Science History in the NGSS Classroom

McCormick Place - W179a

This workshop highlights one way to incorporate science history on a routine basis in the science classroom. Participants will receive a brief overview of the neuroscience research that explains why storytelling is emerging as one of the most effective educational tools for students of all ages. They will also explore how telling stories from science history promotes understanding of science practices, supports strong student science identities, and leads to discussion about the human nature of science and the underlying ethical and cultural implications. The presenter will share about the development of People to Ponder, a series of science profiles that can be used throughout a school year. This is not one specific set of scientists but rather a strategy to consistently include science history in instruction. Participants will experience through a student lens what a typical People to Ponder lesson might involve. Once they’ve experienced the strategy, participants will have a chance to reflect on and discuss how they might structure something similar in their classrooms. Participants will be provided with resources and instructional scaffolds that can assist them in their planning. They will leave with at least one activity or lesson planned for implementation in their classroom.

Takeaways: Explore a strategy for sharing science biographies that promotes student engagement and understanding of science topics while creating an inclusive and culturally responsive teaching environment.

Speakers

Anna Babarinde (Sonoma County Office of Education: Santa Rosa, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

People to Ponder

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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IMMUNOLOGY! Using a Board Game to Model a Biological Process

McCormick Place - W196a

Interactive games are an engaging and effective way to review biology concepts if learning the game rules does not interfere with learning the biology. We have developed IMMUNOLOGY! an easy board game whose object is to "get all of your immune system’s components from START to the infection”. The game is designed to model the process of an immune response, as the game’s pieces are cells and proteins used in the response to infection. To win, players must use the pieces in the proper order and answer questions about immunity along the way. Following the activity, students apply their understanding to discuss vaccine function. IMMUNOLOGY! was developed as a review activity for postsecondary introductory microbiology class, but it could easily be customized to a variety of biological processes at multiple levels of instruction. In this presentation we will show how to construct the IMMUNOLOGY! game and how to play it. Finally, we will demonstrate how the game could be modified to teach other biological concepts/processes such central dogma, photosynthesis, respiration, cell division in a fun and interactive way.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to use a board game to model a biological process and make their own to use in their classroom.

Speakers

Alicia Cecil (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN), Mary Gobbett (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Blank Pawn Photo.pdf
Cell Mediated Pawn Photo.pdf
Gene Expression Question List.docx
Humoral Response Pawn Photo.pdf
Student Instructions.docx

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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How to create a simple bioinformatics activity that connects to your current science curricula.

McCormick Place - W193b

Advances in biotechnology, particularly DNA sequencing, has led to a surge in genetic data and large online databases. Interpreting these data, using the interdisciplinary field of bioinformatics, is in high demand because genome sequencing is becoming increasingly cheaper and faster. In science classrooms, there are many opportunities to incorporate bioinformatics, but this can be a daunting task for teachers who do not know where to begin. This hands-on activity starts by introducing participants to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) website. Presenters will provide a brief overview of the database to guide participants on: 1) how to use the search functions of the database, 2) interpret information on sequence pages, and 3) how to download DNA, RNA or amino acid sequences. Following the guided tour, small groups will be provided discussion questions to discover potential areas within their curricula that could be reinforced or enhanced with a brief bioinformatics activity. Participants will be provided worksheets to help document relevant sequence information (accession numbers) for the biological phenomenon or topic that inspired the activity. The participants will leave with a basic understanding of sequence capture from NCBI and a rudimentary activity to expose students to sequence data analysis.

Takeaways: An understanding of the genetic code and basic internet browsing skills are all that are needed to explore bioinformatics and use them in the classroom.

Speakers

Zack Bateson (National Agricultural Genotyping Center: Fargo, ND), Jane Hunt (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

How to Create a Simple Bioinformatics Activity - NSTA Chicago 22.pdf
Presentation Slides for the Workshop Session on Creating a Simple Bioinformatics Acitivity
Bringing bioinformatics into the science classroom.pdf
Electronic version of the worksheet used during the Workshop Session

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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A Unique and Challenging Ice Core Investigation that Integrates the Three Dimensions of NGSS & STEM

McCormick Place - W176c

The GISP2 H-Core was collected in 1992 adjacent to the Greenland Ice Sheet Project Two (GISP2) drill site. The GISP2-H 125.6-meter firm and ice core is a record of 430 years of liquid electrical conductivity and nitrate concentrations. The liquid electrical conductivity sequence contains signals from a number of known volcanic eruptions that provide a dating system at specific locations along the core. The terrestrial and solar background nitrate records show seasonal and annual variations – as well as unique events. Several major nitrate anomalies within the record do not correspond to any known terrestrial or solar events, and there is compelling evidence that some nitrate anomalies within the GISP2 H-Core could possibly be a record of supernova events. This investigation provides participants with a better understanding of the scientific process of analyzing data and developing models to construct knowledge, and defending the results. Sometimes there is no answer key, only possible solutions from analyzing and constructing knowledge from multiple sources that cross traditional disciplines. The materials focus on NGSS scientific practices, crosscutting concepts and the Earth and space sciences core disciplinary ideas – including analyzing and interpreting data, patterns, cycles of energy and matter, Earth systems and Earth and human activity.

Takeaways: In constructing new knowledge, sometimes there is no definitive answer, only plausible conclusions based on constructing, analyzing, and comparing data and research from multiple disciplines.

Speakers

Donna Young (NASA/NSO/UoL Program Manager: Laughlin, NV)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Jamboard Online Version of Ice Core Records
This version makes it easier for groups to work together individually and in a group to share their progress.
Ice Core Records.pdf
Ice Core Records Presentation
Ice Core Records Investigation Student Handout
A JS9 Image Analysis Analysis Investigation
This JS9 investigation is an excellent extension for the Ice Core Activity to help determine the date of the Cas A supernova event.
Ice Core Webinar for Educators
The Ice Core Records Investigation from the Earth Scientist Magazine
This article provides an overview of the Ice Core Materials for Educators.

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Butterfly Gardening Using Native Plants

McCormick Place - W185d

Butterfly Gardening Using Native Plants workshop is a very exciting educational experience! This session will guide participants through exposure to native North American plants that are host plants for butterfly caterpillars as well as nectar plants to attract adults. We will participate in an assortment of hands-on activities which include creating a "Life Cycle Plate" and singing the "Metamorphosis Song". A main focus of this session is to provide participants with strategies to enable them to create and sustain their own schoolyard habitat. A roadmap to success will be shared, along with a question and answer session for potential challenges! . Beyond the workshop, continued implementation support will be shared with a comprehensive digital data collection and email contact information provided to participants. They will also receive contact information for the North American Butterfly Association, and The Native Plant Society for their local area. Resources will be shared focusing on the importance of organic gardening in relationship to a successful butterfly garden. Finally, an assortment of grant opportunities will be shared in order to assist teachers in getting funding for their projects. Upon completion of this time together, butterfly enthusiasts will be dispatched throughout the country. Once implemented, students and parents will be captivated by the beauty of the garden, and will sustain life lessons on the vital connection we share with our environment.

Takeaways: Participates will leave with the knowledge to go back to their schools/classroom equipped with the knowledge to set up an area to attract an assortment of native butterflies.

Speakers

Nancy Sale (Lillie C. Evans K-8 Center: Miami, FL)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Budburst Community Science: Observing Plants in a Changing World

McCormick Place - W176c

Budburst is a national community science project that brings together researchers, educators, gardeners, and community scientists to make careful observations of the timing of plant life cycle events, or phenophases. Changes over time can be used to illustrate how plants and ecosystems are being affected by human impacts on the environment, especially climate change. By joining Budburst, students can connect to nature wherever they live while participating in an authentic scientific investigation with real-world impacts. In this session educators will learn how they can use Budburst to engage their students in collecting and using real scientific data to examine local plant phenomena and address the NGSS. They will learn about the resources freely available to educators on the Budburst website, including tools allowing them to (1) create their own virtual classroom and set up student accounts, (2) collect and submit data with students, and (3) access existing data to help students ask and analyze their own questions about plants, ecosystems, and climate change. Finally, participants will learn how other educators have implemented Budburst in their classrooms and explore how they can use this flexible platform to scaffold their students’ participation in different stages of the scientific process.

Takeaways: Learn to engage students in local plant phenomena and real-world climate change science using Budburst resources.

Speakers

Sarah Jones (Chicago Botanic Garden: Glencoe, IL), Rebecca Ammann (Chicago Botanic Garden: Glencoe, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Budburst Overview for Educators
Using the Budburst Mobile App.pdf
Plants in A Changing World Presentation Slides

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Using Nonfiction Children's Books to Engage Students of All Ages in Biology Content

McCormick Place - W181c

Nonfiction for children has changed over the years with a wide variety of types, formats, and writing styles with captivating photos, illustrations, and artwork that engages and informs students of all ages. This interactive session will allow participants to observe a large collection of nonfiction children’s books. These books cover a variety of biology topics, such as chemistry, cells, genetics, diversity of life, microbiology, evolution and ecology. They will also provide information on ecosystem organisms, chemical cycling, and soil background. Books that highlight the life and achievements of a variety of scientists will also be presented to participants. The session will explain how the children’s books are used in several introductory college biology courses to introduce/reinforce textbook content for public health, nursing, elementary education, and other non-science majors. This format can easily be transferred to grade 6-12 classrooms. In the elementary education courses, the books are used in the 5E model format. Students connect science standards, along with explore and expand activities, to the children’s books for a semester collection of elementary lessons. The book list can be used by elementary teachers for nonfiction literacy assignments, library resources, science club activities, and engaging content for science standards.

Takeaways: This interactive session will allow participants to observe a large collection of nonfiction children’s books. These books will cover a variety of biology topics, provide ecosystem background information, and highlight the life and achievements of a variety of scientists. The session will explain how the children’s books are used in several introductory college biology and K-12 curriculums.

Speakers

Mary Gobbett (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN), Alicia Cecil (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Children's Book List NSTA.docx

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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NASA STEM: Computational Thinking: Crew Transportation with Orion

McCormick Place - W175a

The free NASA STEM lesson plans introduce the practice of computational thinking and include elements of a real NASA mission. NASA’s Artemis program will return humans to the lunar surface for the first time since 1972, the year of the agency's last Apollo moon landing. This Educator Guide provides four standards-aligned activities to help students learn about NASA's Orion spacecraft that will take astronauts to the Moon and beyond. In this session, we will design and build a crew module model that will secure two 2-cm astronaut figures during a drop test. The PowerPoint will be available to all participants. The PowerPoint will include the videos and activities including the tips and pointers. Session Outline: 5 min - Welcome and Introduction to NASA Artemis Mission 10 min- STEM Engagement strategies and culturally relevant teaching 10 min- Introducing the Engineering Design Challenge 20 min- Teams Design a Crew Vehicle 10 min- Testing the Crew Vehicle 5 min- Reviewing the Resources and Q and A https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/np-2020-02-2805-hq.pdf

Takeaways: NASA provides free educational resources that include educator guides with standards-aligned activities to help students use computational thinking while including elements of real NASA missions.

Speakers

Susan Kohler (NASA Glenn Research Center: Cleveland, OH)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Designing Escape Boxes

McCormick Place - W183b

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

Takeaways: Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

Speakers

Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Going Beneath the Surface: Using socioscientific issues to help students engage in 3D learning.

McCormick Place - W185a

Socioscientific issues are scientific topics that require students to engage in meaningful discussions (Zeidler & Nichols, 2009). Additionally, engaging students in socioscientific issues can promote equity, diversity, and help students question biases (Goldsmith et al., 2021). Importantly, these issues are often most likely to promote inclusivity if students have a connection with them. Considering we live in the Midwest, we often use socioscientific issues surrounding agricultural practices. We start with a phenomenon that introduces the example socioscientific issue by showing a video about tilling. We then ask, “Should farmers till the land?” To explore this question, we engage participants by jigsawing four different hands-on activities related to the soil. Participants will explore compact vs. loose soil, reducing water erosion, reducing erosion caused by wind and snow, and the effect of a heat lamp on the temperature of soil. Participants will use science and engineering practices such as planning and carrying out investigations and analyzing and interpreting data. We will debrief the activities and model how we help students make sense of the science ideas. We will finish the presentation by discussing how to find suitable socioscientific issues, include culturally responsive teaching practices, and provide some strategies for integrating with the NGSS.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about how to use socioscientific issues and culturally responsive practices to engage students with social issues that require scientific knowledge.

Speakers

Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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NASA's Newest X-plane: "X-57 -- It's Electrifying!"

McCormick Place - W193a

Did you know that every U.S. aircraft flying today, and every U.S. air traffic control facility, uses NASA-developed technology in some way? Participants in this session will gain insights into how NASA Aeronautics work to make aviation truly sustainable by reducing delays and environmental impacts, transforming aviation efficiency and safety, while reducing noise, fuel use, harmful emissions, and ultimately transform the way we fly. NASA’s X-57 Maxwell is an experimental aircraft designed to test operating multiple electric motors for use in turning propellers – an idea known as “distributed electric propulsion.” This session highlights an activity from NASA’s “X-57 Electric Airplane: STEM Learning Module” (https://www.nasa.gov/aeroresearch/stem/X57 ) part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help students learn about NASA’s X-57 Maxwell and the science behind electric propulsion. This session will focus on the “X-57 Maxwell: Circuits Activity Guide” that engages participants to build a light-up paper helicopter by creating a “parallel circuit” that uses copper foil tape, two LED lights, and a battery. This session’s goals are to demonstrate that an all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly. Session participants will understand that knowledge gained from the X-57 Maxwell research will help engineers design future electric-powered aircraft for everything from urban air mobility to moving passengers and cargo between nearby cities.

Takeaways: 1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM activity in their classroom that encourages students to create a parallel circuit on a paper helicopter as an introduction to circuitry and propulsion. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how NASA’s X-57 Maxwell all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly while gaining a better understanding of the STEM concepts of energy transfer, and the physical science of pressure and aerodynamics.

Speakers

LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)