2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

More sessions and events will be added to the browser throughout January.
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137 results

Lunch: Elements of Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Wednesday, July 20 • 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Regency Ballroom


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

By Invitation Only

Shifting from traditional professional development to curriculum-based professional learning is a simple concept but complex to design and execute well. At its core, it means teachers experience the same kind of inquiry-based learning we expect them to provide their students. Learn more about a Carnegie Corporation of New York report, The Elements, which identifies a core set of research-based actions, approaches, and enabling conditions that effective schools and systems have put in place to reinforce and amplify the power of high-quality curriculum and skillful teaching.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Examine beliefs and assumptions regarding the relationship between high-quality instructional materials, curriculum-based professional learning and student success 2. Gain understanding of the foundation for The Elements, a challenge paper from Carnegie Corporation of New York 3. Learn from science practitioners whose successful curriculum implementation efforts are grounded in the elements and essentials.

SPEAKERS:
Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

NSTA First-Timers Orientation Session

Thursday, July 21 • 7:30 AM - 8:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


Show Details

Feeling overwhelmed by all there is to see and do at an NSTA conference on science education? Join us for an interactive exploration through the conference app and NSTA’s social media. By the end of the session, you will know just how to get the most from your conference experience in addition to building new networks with your science colleagues.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Allan (University of Central Oklahoma: Edmond, OK)

Homes for the Hurricane Homeless: The Integration of STEM, Place-Based Learning, and Designing Thinking in the Elementary Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W180


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Hurricanes, flash floods, and wildfires. Climate change brings more extreme weather, and the results can be catastrophic to our communities. As the weather becomes more severe, there is an increased need for shelters that can be easily transported and assembled to provide relief shelter for families who have been displaced from their homes. In this session, attendees will engage in an authentic STEM inquiry implemented in third and fourth-grade classrooms. The inquiry was designed so that students would be able to explore homelessness caused by natural disasters and design a tiny house prototype for a family in need. Participants will learn about planning and implementing a place-based and integrated STEM inquiry during this session. A major focus will be on planning and sensemaking as students learn through authentic opportunities and real-world mathematics and science. The presenter will share experiences using the Design Thinking Framework and place-based methodology as a guide for implementing and designing integrated STEM inquiries. In addition, the presenter will give specific strategies for developing problem statements to engage students in empathetic responses within STEM inquiries. The presenter will also share specific strategies for developing empathy during STEM inquiries for elementary-aged students. Participants will have the opportunity to experience key parts of the inquiry and view student examples.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Engage participants in NGSS-based engineering design challenge where participants are required to design a solution for homelessness caused by natural disasters (hurricane, floods, wildfire); 2. Learn the role of empathy in authentic STEM inquiries by using Design Thinking principles; and 3. Outline possible place-based strategies for implementing STEM inquiries in upper elementary classrooms that engage all learners in STEM.

SPEAKERS:
Jennifer Williams (Isidore Newman School: New Orleans, LA)

Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a Brand New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Since its release, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the NGSS has become an essential tool for many educators across the country. A new version titled the Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimension has been developed to not only support teachers in all states that have standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education. This new version of the Quick-Reference Guide still contains the most useful features of the original, including descriptions of the practices and the crosscutting concepts from the Framework of K-12 Science Education and K-12 progressions of the elements of all three dimensions. In addition, the new Quick-Reference Guide contains several new features that should make it even more helpful. For example, every element now has a unique code (based on the codes in the NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions) that makes it much easier to reference a particular element. In addition, there is an entire chapter devoted to the Performance Expectations. Finally, the guide also contains a number of tools for working with standards. This session will outline all of the features of the guide through the process of unpacking the crosscutting concepts to better understand how to make curriculum, instruction, and assessment more three-dimensional.

TAKEAWAYS:
A deeper understanding of the Crosscutting Concepts and how a well-designed reference guide can make it easier to unpack the three dimensions for work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Engaging with Data using CODAP in InquiryHub 3D Storylined Biology

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W196a


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Analyzing and interpreting data and using mathematical and computational reasoning are complex at the high school level, which requires students to employ correlational and causational thinking while manipulating visualizations using tools. CODAP, a product of the Concord Consortium, is designed to give students access to these powerful practices with minimal software requirements and with a mission to make data literacy accessible for all students. InquiryHub uses CODAP to provide students with agency because they can determine the variables of interest, in which to create graphical representations from the same data set. In our free, open-source program, students can work with authentic datasets from the CODAP website, data they gather, or data from professional studies. Inside our storyline instructional sequences, inquiryHub leverages CODAP as students analyze the rainfall on the Serengeti and how it correlates to wildebeest populations. In the session, participants will try out CODAP by adding multiple variables of data to answer the question, “What’s happening to large animals on the Serengeti plain?” and how to apply CODAP in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
CODAP can be used in many different three-dimensional ways to have students analyze and interpret data to make sense of phenomena while providing student agency.

SPEAKERS:
Kerri Wingert (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Using Online Investigations with Digitized Specimens to Enhance Data Literacy and Scientific Reasoning

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
EPIC Bioscience - Data Interpretation Guide
Visual student guide to interpreting data patterns, with examples and non-examples.
EPIC Bioscience - Specimen Measurement Guide
A visual guide to measuring specimens, with examples and non-examples.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Online investigations with digitized specimens offer broad opportunities for teachers to engage their students in authentic scientific research. EPIC Bioscience investigations are free, online, NGSS-aligned research investigations that guide students to participate in science practices: asking a question, collecting data, analyzing and interpreting findings, and communicating to others. Investigations use specimens from natural history collections in entomology, vertebrate zoology, mycology, and botany to provide fully-supported, online investigations centered on real phenomena and aligned to NGSS MSLS2-1 through NGSS MSLS2-4. These investigations offer key opportunities to enhance scientific literacy through effective sensemaking with student-collected data on compelling specimens. This session focuses on two key goals to help teachers support sensemaking during phenomena-based student investigations: (1) Identifying and remediating common student errors and confusion during data collection and analysis. (2) Practicing effective instructional strategies focused on enhancing students’ scientific reasoning and data interpretation. This session will involve hands-on experiences with student activities, as well as interactive discussion of classroom examples and evidence.

TAKEAWAYS:
Identify common student errors and sources of confusion during data collection, analysis, and interpretation and deploy strategies designed to enhance student sensemaking from data.

SPEAKERS:
Kirsten Butcher (The University of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT), Madlyn Larson (Natural History Museum of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT)

Everything You Always Wanted to Know about NGSS, But Were Afraid to Ask

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W175a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Everything you always wanted to know about NGSS_Handout.pdf
Everything you always wanted to know about NGSS_Presentation.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The NGSS is very complicated. The Institute for Quality Science Teaching at the Museum of Science and Industry provides professional learning opportunities for science teachers in Chicagoland and surrounding areas. Our approach is to ground everything we do in the NGSS and take a deep dive into all the elements of 3-dimensional learning. Professional learning programs at MSI are invested in helping teachers understand how to teach science effectively to meet these standards. Teachers in our programs learn science content in the context of 3-dimensional lessons, as instructors demonstrate instructional practices that enable NGSS-aligned teaching and learning. This presentation will review the basics of the NGSS, the 3 dimensions, how they’re combined in Performance Expectations, and the basics of enacting the NGSS in the classroom. If you need a refresher, just want a review, or still don’t have all those acronyms straight in your head, this is the presentation for you.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will leave with a basic understanding of the structures of the Next Generation Science Standards and how they inform 3-dimensional standards and 3-dimensional science teaching.

SPEAKERS:
Lauren Slanker (Museum of Science and Industry: Chicago, IL), Karin Klein (Museum of Science and Industry: Chicago, IL)

Lucy’s Legacy – Human Evolution for the 21st Century Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The 1974 discovery of the iconic Lucy fossil in Ethiopia changed our understanding of human origins. Almost everyone today knows of Lucy, but over the last 48 years the field of human origins has exploded thanks to new discoveries all over the world as well as critical new developments in the realm of molecular biology. Few biology classes address these advances. However, the tools and techniques students learn in STEM classes have a direct connection to the advances and changes that have shaped modern work with human origins. Attending this session will give you the chance to appreciate the revolution that has occurred since “Lucy” and offer you tools to bring new understanding to your students in ways you can weave into your curriculum in less controversial ways connected to evolution, fossils, DNA, proteomics, genealogy, biogeography, 3D printing, as well as topics related to more recent human evolution (skin color, lactose tolerance, and high-altitude adaptation). As a 32-year K-12 human evolution educator who has been fortunate to work with leaders in the field, I have had a front row seat to many of the milestones of human evolution in the 21st century and I’m eager to share them with you.

TAKEAWAYS:
Since the discovery of Lucy, our understanding of human origins has grown and changed thanks to new discoveries and technologies – participants will learn about these amazing changes and how to integrate these new discoveries into their biology curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
John Mead (St. Mark's School of Texas: Dallas, TX)

Did I really just flip this classroom?

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Presentation note taking worksheet

STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

The purpose of the presentation is to model how to flip a classroom from the traditional methods to more innovative methods to engage students. The participants will be able to create a deck by the end of the session. Participants will be given the background and research based strategies that Pear Deck uses to ensure that equity and inclusion are met while ensuring the seamless integration of the platform. Participants will be given the pedagogy of why this tool is needed in their classroom. Participants will be introduced to EdPuzzle and Screencastify to highlight how these tools can be used as well to flip their classrooms. A Pear Deck interactive slide will be presented to the audience. The audience will log in with the given code. As I present the audience will have my screen on their device. The audience will participate in a series of interactive activities designed to immerse them platform and give them the experience that students will have. The presentation is highly interactive with the first half of the presentation be using to interact with the platforms and the second half given for participants to explore and ask questions. The audience will be engaged with device-based activities from the beginning to the end of the presentation. The presentation style will be catch and release. I will capture their attention for some time and then I will release them to navigate through the platforms while I offer support. Attendees will learn how to create a Pear Deck, a screencastify recording and how to navigate through EdPuzzle to either create or utilize existing videos. Attendees will learn how to take the materials they are already using to flip them into a more blended learning model. The attendees will walk away with a Deck that can be used immediately in their classroom and my information to reach out to me if they have any questions during implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will walk away with the basic knowledge of how to flip their classroom and be able to implement the strategies immediately into their classroom so that they are able to increase equity and inclusion.

SPEAKERS:
Cecelia Gillam (Hahnville High School: La Place, LA)

Engineering for Us All: Exploring the "Why," "What," and "Who" of Engineering

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W194a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Baseball card lesson
Baseball card lesson (complete)
More information on e4usa
Playpump lesson
Product archaeology lesson
Robot arm lesson (with materials list)
Shoe sole sketch and design lesson
Slides from presentation

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

“You’re good at math; be an engineer.” Isn’t there more to it? Who is an engineer? Engineering helps society by solving problems. Let’s explore “why.”

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn that engineering is more than math + science and take away classroom activities addressing engineering identity, ethics, and society (not your typical engineering activities).

SPEAKERS:
Ken Reid (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

A Holistic Approach to Building Community

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W185b-c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Slide Deck_NSTA Chicago 2022

STRAND: Coping in Resilience in Science and STEM Teaching

Show Details

Finding support and collaboration, especially in rural settings, can be challenging for educators. The Interstate Science Collaborative (ISC) was formed by state science leaders from a handful of rural states to provide free professional learning for the teachers they serve. Fall and spring book study sessions and a summer learning series were offered with considerations toward equitable participation including making the sessions virtual, being mindful of schedules and capacity, and providing continuing education credits. Feedback from the sessions centered around appreciation from participants for the opportunity to connect with teachers from other states to discuss and share in conversations around common problems of practice. In addition to providing support for educators, the ISC became a safe space for the founding members to share challenges and successes in their own work. Join this presentation to learn about how to set up a professional community in your context that will not only support student learning but can also become a way to create the comradery and community we all need as educators.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will engage in whole and small group discussion to learn about and share strategies to build a professional community that not only focuses on how to improve student learning but also creates a support network for educators.

SPEAKERS:
Sharon Cates (Phenomenon Science Education: Amherst, MA), Christy Krenek (New Mexico Public Education Department: Santa Fe, NM), Shannon Wachowski (EdReports.org: Fort Collins, CO)

Making A Career In Science Education In 2022

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Confused about what to do post COVID? Thinking about switching careers? Learn about the experiences, challenges, and mistakes made by several esteemed science education leaders in this engaging and interactive panel discussion. This panel will feature current and former teachers, school leaders, district leaders, consultants, academics, national STEM education leaders.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about the increasing number of opportunities available for educators both inside and outside of the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Lach (The University of Chicago: Highland Park, IL)

The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

One of the key features of the NGSS and other standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education is the idea that a “a progression of knowledge occurs from grade band to grade band that gives students the opportunity to learn more complex material, leading to an overall understanding of science by the end of high school.” (NGSS Appendix A, p. 2) The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions has a set of 62 maps that illustrate the how the elements of the three dimensions build on each other and connect to one another. Each map focuses on a particular topic and shows the progression students are expected to make in that topic from one grade-span to the next. Arrows connecting individual elements on a map indicate that competency in one element is useful in learning to achieve the other element. Educators can use maps to deepen their understanding of the standards to plan or improve curriculum, instruction, and assessment. This session will provide participants guidance on how to read the maps in the Atlas and use this powerful tool to deepen their understanding of elements of the standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
A careful review of the connections between elements of the three dimensions can provide a clearer understanding of science standards and important guidance in planning instructional sequences to support three-dimensional teaching and learning.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Maximize the Benefits and Minimize the Challenges Associated with Embedding Engineering into the Science Curriculum using Argument-Driven Engineering

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

This session is an introduction to a new approach to STEM instruction called Argument-Driven Engineering (ADE). ADE is an instructional approach that gives students an opportunity to learn to use core concepts and processes form science, engineering, and mathematics to figure out solutions to a meaningful and authentic problem that will help make the world a better place. This instructional approach also gives students an opportunity to develop disciplinary literacy skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) because they must obtain information, share and critique potential solutions through talk, and communicate what they figured out and how they know the solution is acceptable through writing. In this session, participants will examine the potential benefits and challenges associated with embedding engineering design into science classrooms and learn how the ADE instructional model can help maximize the benefits and reduce the challenges. Participants will also have a chance to experience an example of an ADE design challenge that invites them to design a shipping and storage container for insulin and see examples of how students who completed this design challenge used science, engineering, and mathematics content and processes to figure out how to keep the insulin cold for long periods of time. Participants will also learn about how this new approach was developed through three years of classroom-based research by a team of researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and how well ADE instructional materials are aligned with the TEKS for science, mathematics, CTE, and ELA.

TAKEAWAYS:
• How to give students an opportunity to learn how to use concepts and processes from science, engineering, and mathematics to design a solution to an authentic problem that will help make the world a better place.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Crash Science: When Physics Meets Biology

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Use innovative video-assisted STEM activities, demonstrations, award-winning videos, and behind-the-crash-tests tours to teach the science of car crashes. Visit classroom.iihs.org for more information.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants learn how to incorporate culminating STEM design challenges (Project Pedestrian Sensors and Egg-Carrying Paper Car Crash) into their curriculum to promote student awareness and understanding of how engineering and technology are used to build safer vehicles.

SPEAKERS:
Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

Partnering with NSTA to Reach Your Professional Learning Goals

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Slides Partnering with NSTA to Reach Your Professional Learning Goals

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

NSTA Partnerships provide personalized professional learning experiences for groups of K–12 educators. Find out more about this NSTA opportunity that combines membership with access to resources, online tools, and the national network.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will discover the value of becoming a Partner with NSTA for groups of educators.

SPEAKERS:
Flavio Mendez (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

#LeadershipGoals

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
#Leadership Goals - NSTA Chicago Summer 2022.pdf
Slide Deck with all links

STRAND: Coping in Resilience in Science and STEM Teaching

Show Details

What are your #LeadershipGoals? All educators are leaders: in their classroom, department, institution, and personal life. During this workshop, participants will reflect on how they envision themselves as a leader, engage with a self evaluation tool, and consider the steps in developing an action plan for making change in their leadership life. Providing resources from the freely available, recently published guide Honoring Teachers as Professionals through AIP Publishing, the authors will share how university/K-12 partnerships led to increases in their own leadership capacity, building of professional networks, and improved professional development opportunities through self-reflective classroom research. We will discuss research and experiences around these partnerships, leadership in education, goal setting, and how participants can work towards the same.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will reflect on how they envision themselves as a leader, engage with a self evaluation tool, and develop an action plan for making change in their leadership life.

SPEAKERS:
Shannon Wachowski (EdReports.org: Fort Collins, CO)

Cloudy with a Chance of Modeling

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Our students use field work, computer modeling, and long term databases to understand the Earth's changing system. Students collect local weather data. They compare this data with regional and national databases, satellites databases, and climate modeling software (EdGCM).

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn how to introduce climate science in a non-threatening way by empowering their students to take a stand in their communities regarding decisions that affect their future by seamlessly incorporating field studies with professional climate studies.

SPEAKERS:
Carolyn Mohr (University Center of Lake County: Grayslake, IL)

Developing school-based science teacher leadership through a collaborative learning community.

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W181b


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Participants will be introduced to an ongoing partnership between Chicago Public Schools and Loyola University Chicago in which 40 K-8 teachers participated in a Master Teacher Leadership Cohort to support the rollout of a newly-adopted science curriculum. The cohort supports teachers in becoming leaders in their schools and across the district, ensuring a greater impact on underrepresented students by removing barriers to appropriate grade-level content and high-quality instruction. We will begin by highlighting activities from the cohort that develop teacher knowledge of the NGSS and best practices in science instruction, including learning cycle action plans and other strategies to make practice public and engage in collaborative problem-solving (20 min). We will then share strategies for the development of teacher leadership, including case study work, leadership self-assessment and goal-setting, and leadership breakout discussions, where teachers were invited to share individual areas of expertise in science teacher leadership. (15 min) We will then engage participants in preparing for two of the cohort activities: an instructional strategy share-out (“pineapple share”) and leadership breakout discussions. (15 min) We will end with thoughts from a teacher leader in the cohort about how to recruit, retain, and engage teachers in this type of community. (10 min)

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave this session with the tools they can use to develop collaboration, leadership, and high-quality science instruction among science teacher leaders.

SPEAKERS:
Andre Botello (Chicago Public Schools: Chicago, IL), Julie Jacobi (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL), Allison Grandberry (Chicago Public Schools: Chicago, IL), Kayla Cherry (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL)

Including Teachers in Developing Large-Scale Assessments for Science

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Learn about the novel approach taken by Illinois to include teacher voice in developing a statewide three-dimensional science assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about the process of developing a state-wide assessment written by local educators.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Harvey Henson (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL), Angela Box (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL)

Environmental Justice Coalition: Including and Empowering Students in Civic Action

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W178a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Environmental Justice Coalition Presentation

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

This session will provide educators with a clear understanding of environmental justice and give them tools to integrate this topic into science classrooms and student-led initiatives. We will focus on the case study of the Sonoma County Environmental Justice Coalition. During the 2021-2022 school year, middle and high school teams from across Sonoma County were invited to sign up for a year-long learning and leadership development program hosted by the Sonoma County Office of Education. Student teams received training and mentorship around environmental justice throughout the year and created and implemented local action plans to address an environmental justice issue. Students had the opportunity to receive input and mentorship from professionals and share their actions and future plans with local leaders and industries at a culminating showcase. Participants will hear a brief overview of the structure of the coalition and will view testimonials from student members. Participants will receive tools to integrate environmental justice into their classrooms and resources to help student teams develop and implement environmental justice action plans. Finally, participants will work collaboratively to design next steps for scaling environmental justice in their classroom and beyond by using their local resources and networks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Explore how to integrate environmental justice and civic engagement in science classrooms and programs.

SPEAKERS:
Ryan Kurada (Sonoma County Office of Education: Santa Rosa, CA), Anna Babarinde (Sonoma County Office of Education: Santa Rosa, CA)

Global Conversations: International Film Festival

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W186c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session will showcase lessons from around the world focusing on the exchange of ideas and networking. Come view a film created using videos from teachers around the globe, and posters while engaging with other teachers looking to network internationally.

TAKEAWAYS:
This session will showcase lessons from around the world focusing on the exchange of ideas and networking. Come view a film created using videos from teachers around the globe, and posters while engaging with other teachers looking to network internationally.

SPEAKERS:
Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

Installation Science Exhibits as Assessment Options

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W187c


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

To help develop more scientifically curious and literate students, we use scientific literature or documentaries to engage students in developing the NGSS science practices. Students find an interesting topic, generate a question, collect and analyze data and then develop a Science Installation that communicates their learning to the greater community. Our most recent class project had students study how to grow food in a simulated Mars environment with the conditions controlled by student programmed raspberry pis. High school students organized 6th graders to do hands on data collection. They created a 10x12 foot exhibit that looked like a Martian landscape and highlighted the equipment they used with the plants still growing. The display included QR codes to communicate data and research using student-created videos, infographics, and data tables. Other installations include a monochromatic yellow room where everything looks grey and allowed observers to learn about the properties of light and the ways light energy is used in photosynthesis, the way it can be used to promote electrons, and the way it produces color. Other exhibits include sound waves and a history or music and musical instruments, the chemistry of color, and an environmental study of our use of carbon.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to guide students in the reading of scientific literature or the watching of documentaries in order to generate an authentic question and project. (How can we develop the capacity to farm on Mars? How does yellow monochromatic light produce the absence of color (an episode of Abstract, What can we learn about pollen structure from 3D printed files from Bayer’s agricultural division?) Participants will review a process to take the question and generate an authentic study that transcends a single class, grade, or discipline. (Students in 11th grade worked with students in 6th grade to test growing plants under controlled conditions that simulated Mars. Students in art and physics classes explored the properties of light and created a light-based art exhibit with science lessons on QR codes) Participants will explore a template for guiding students through the creation of an installation/exhibit that creatively shows the question, their experiment, their analysis, and potential solutions or conclusions in a creative and community-informing way. The exhibit is similar to an art installation with QR codes and experiment/study artifacts presented in a museum like scenario.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Helfant (Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School: Saint Louis, MO)

Instructional Materials that Support Equitable Science Instruction for All Students

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

In this session, participants will be introduced to a framework for identifying the features of a classroom culture that support equitable sensemaking. There are four main features: 1. Who is engaged in (or excluded from) classroom activity? 2. Who is treated as a "knower" in the classroom? 3. What ways of knowing are privileged in the classroom? 4. What science is practiced in the classroom? This framework is based off Kerri Wingert's Classroom Culture Investigations document and utilized as a foundational pieces of the OpenSciEd materials. Participants will unpack this framework and identify in sample pieces of student work and classroom videos examples of each one of these categories in action. They will be provided with tools and resources for self-assessing their own classroom culture including an exit ticket they can give to students to help inform the instruction. Examples of student work and instructional materials will be from the OpenScIEd instructional materials for middle school science.

TAKEAWAYS:
Classroom culture is critical to providing equitable sensemaking opportunities for all students.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

The STEM of PBL

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
_Main_Course.pdf
http://bit.ly/STEMPBLQA
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1c38TeuqPSC-vS8GLiVXQH9GzI7g0sjbx/view?usp=sharing
STEM PBL in action
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HyFVEpZyEY
STEM PBL in action
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
Guiding questions
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
The Engineering Design Process/Journal Reflections
Projects VS PBL.docx
What Is PBL_ARTICLE.pdf
Why Is PBL Important_ARTICLE.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

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Participants will understand how to develop and effectively implement STEM curriculum units that include project based activities and performance based assessments. Participants will learn to help students answer complex questions and develop solutions for challenges and real-world problems. They will also assist students with extending and refining their acquired knowledge to routinely analyze and solve problems. By the end of this session: 1) Participants will gain a clear and coherent understanding of what a STEM PBL is and how it works. 2) Participants will be able to identify and create effective essential questions. 3) Participants will be able to identify and apply the components of a STEM PBL. 4) Understand how STEM PBL’s will impact instruction for participants and students. Agenda: What is PBL? Why is it important? How does a STEM PBL Work? How to effectively integrate journal reflections. Ways to Implement STEM PBL’s

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to effectively implement STEM PBL’s (Project Based Learning) by integrating the components of STEM and PBL in order to grow students' capacity for creativity, fun, and back-loaded learning in a STEM context.

SPEAKERS:
Adero Carter (Clayton County Public Schools: Jonesboro, GA)

Evaluating STEM Curricula with Equity and Inclusivity in Mind

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

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Explore EiE’s curriculum design principles for inclusivity and NSTA’s sensemaking pillars as tools to evaluate curricula for inclusivity and equity.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave this session with a framework for evaluating curricula with equity and inclusivity in mind.

SPEAKERS:
Diana Christopherson (Museum of Science, Boston: Boston, MA)

Building Yourself as a Teacher Leader and Change Agent

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
NSTA Storytelling Presentation.pdf

STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

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Learn about opportunities to become a change agent within your school, district, and beyond. Discussion will be around strategies and programs to support teacher advocates.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn strategies and opportunities to support them in becoming change agents at various levels: within their school or district, local community, and state.

SPEAKERS:
Nicole Vick (Northwestern University: No City, No State), Maggie Moore (Hononegah High School: Rockton, IL)

Creating and Sustaining Innovative Learning Spaces: Grants 101

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W193b


STRAND: No Strand

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Need FREE grant funds for STEAM education, but don't know where to start? This session unpacks how to engineer a grant proposal in 12 steps.

TAKEAWAYS:
From this session, educators will be able to: 1. describe grant types and grant funders; 2. illustrate the 12-step grant writing process; and 3. identify sources of grant funding.

SPEAKERS:
Bejanae Kareem (Educator: Jonesboro, GA)

Creating Digital Works with iPad in the Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W186b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Leah LaCrosse NSTA Bulb Page
This page will give access to presentations in pdf and original files.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

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From cartoon strips to mini documentaries, students can create digital works that show their science understanding. Having an all in one tool like the iPad allows students to show growth in their understanding with exciting, creative projects. Capturing videos, sounds and photos begins the student journey in learning. This session will begin with the why and move into the how. Sharing free apps for creation, the presenter will demonstrate the power of student creation. We will also highlight the various ways to assess and publish these student projects.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will leave this session with ready to go ideas for digital creation using iPad in the science classroom. Student samples from an 8th grade science classroom will be shared.

SPEAKERS:
Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH)

Arctic Engagement - Interdisciplinary Opportunities and Strategies from Polar Educators International

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W176a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Arctic Engagement
This is our slideshow with all links, including information about PolarTREC and Polar Educators International.

STRAND: No Strand

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The Arctic keeps the entire world climate in balance and is a crucial, relevant, and engaging area of study for students. PolarTREC teachers will relate their experiences working with polar research scientists in Greenland to action projects for students in grades 6-12. The session will include interdisciplinary lessons and classroom strategies designed to connect polar science with Arctic geography and ecosystems and also economic and cultural systems . Moreover, the presenters are on the Council of Polar Educators International and will introduce participants to that organization and its strategies for building greater inclusion of Indigenous Arctic peoples in the global conversation about climate change and its repercussions..

TAKEAWAYS:
Practical multicurricular resources and activities ready for immediate implementation into curriculum and classroom

SPEAKERS:
Anne Farley Schoeffler (Seton Catholic School: Hudson, OH)

Data and Storylines: The key to helping all students become STEM literate

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Data and Storylines
Resources for Teachers
Resource Folder
Resource Folder

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

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News bulletins on social media and news sites contain topics that students need to understand now so that they can make informed decisions for their world today and tomorrow. STEM literacy is crucial to learners struggling to understand the multitude of information bombarding them through television, social media and the internet. Students in K-12 must become STEM literate so that they can identify, understand and solve problems in the world around them. STEM Literacy promotes innovative thinking and creativity as well as collaboration, problem solving, and most importantly, critical thinking. Today’s challenges need answers from our students but first they need to understand issues including climate change, space travel, robotics. By using real-world applications of scientific data and storylines, students become critical consumers, problem-solvers, and change-makers. Students who are STEM literate will be able to think critically and act responsibly about issues that impact them. In this session, lessons and strategies will be shared with teachers to inspire and to support their students as they develop STEM literacy skills. These lessons will encourage students to explore, explain and develop solutions to real phenomena and solve real problems.

TAKEAWAYS:
Three Takeaways: 1) Teachers will become familiar with technology, literacy and adaptive learning for middle school and high school students. 2) Teachers will be introduced to the free materials available that align with NGSS standards. 3) Teachers will be given ideas on how to incorporate these lessons in class