2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:Hands-On Workshop, Chemistry

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
32 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Increasing Scientific Literacy: Strategies, Free Activities, and Resources That Work!

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W178a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Participants will learn strategies and receive numerous resources that increase students’ scientific literacy. The hands-on approach has participants engaged in the activities, games, and more.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will: 1. learn new strategies for incorporating scientific literacy into their lessons; and 2. receive numerous activities, templates, games, and other resources to help with doing this. These resources can be used “as is” or modified to allow for differentiation based on the needs of the learners. Strategies and resources will include ones effective with ELL and EC students.

SPEAKERS:
Iris Mudd (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools: Winston Salem, NC)

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) - An Effective Approach to Ensuring an Inclusive Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines are a tool that can be used to design learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners (CAST, 2018). Instructional designers and teachers can use these principles to create learning environments that reduce barriers to access for all students, while keeping in mind the learning goals of the lesson. The three guiding principles of UDL are engagement, representation, and action and expression. In this session educators will be provided with examples of these principles in action in sample materials from OpenSciEd and classroom videos. In these examples, participating will identify how the materials have been purposefully designed with multiple avenues for engagement, representation, and action and expression. Additionally, they will identify the built-in supports for teachers to highlight student assets and to address potential barriers to learning for their local student population. Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Carlos, CA)

Strategies to Elevate Students Scientific Literacy with Real-World Data

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document of links and the slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Science literacy is essential to be informed and engaged citizens in the 21st century. Data are what we use to do science. Thus, reading and making sense of real-world data are fundamental skills to being scientifically literate and a fun way to engage learners with science. However, how do we incorporate data into K-8 science without feeling overburdened with yet another thing to teach? By integrating it into what we are already doing! Join us to explore the connections between data, science, and literacy. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. The goal is to increase our data toolkit of strategies and resources to increase science literacy and relevance for students. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better helps students do and communicate science. Working with and learning from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ literacy skills. Let’s set our students up for success now and in the future!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into K-8 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, LLC)

Humanizing Science: A Rubric for Evaluating Science Trade Books

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W175c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Humanizing Science Workshop Resources
Access workshop slides, materials, completed examples, and a searchable Outstanding Science Trade Book list at this link.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Trade books are often used to support science instruction, and are an effective way to connect ideas about how science works to classroom science experiences. In this workshop, we will share a rubric for evaluating trade books for science read-alouds and discuss how the tool can be used to inform instruction (e.g., developing discussion questions). The rubric focuses on four concepts related to humanizing science, and aligned with views of nature of science in the Next Generation Science Standards: Science is done by diverse people, Scientists interpret empirical evidence to support their claims, Scientists use a variety of methods, and Scientists are creative at all stages of their investigations. These four concepts support students’ understanding of how science works, laying the foundation for being an effective consumer of science. Additionally, these four concepts present a more accurate representation of scientists, in contrast with many long-standing stereotypes about scientists. Attendees will have the opportunity to use the rubric to analyze elementary-level science trade books and develop a plan for implementing the read-alouds in class. We will conclude by examining how teachers can layer selected trade books effectively into their existing science curriculum.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn why representing science as a human activity is important for students’ understanding of how science works, and will learn how to select and plan for read-alouds of books that humanize science into their existing science curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
Jeanne Brunner (University of Massachusetts Amherst: Amherst, MA), Kathleen Mahoney (Doctoral Student)

Broaden Science Participation: Unpack “Analyze & Interpret” to Teach Data As an Equalizer

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document and a slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

We live in a data-driven world, and our students will be working in a data-driven workforce. Therefore, it is critical that our Pre-K-12 students learn foundational data literacy skills. However, currently these skills are too often only taught in upper-level classes. All students need these skills and all students, down to our little Pre-Kers, can work with and make sense of science data. Let’s make sure data is an equalizer, rather than another divider in our educational system and society! Join us as we explore what perception and learning science tell us about how our brains process data. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources to build science knowledge and self-efficacy through data. Finally, we will explore ways to adapt our existing curriculum activities and data visualizations to help our students more equitably access science. Through hands-on activities and group discussions, participants will leave more empowered to leverage data and data visualizations into their science content in purposeful ways for all learners. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall 21st century skills. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century for all students and ways to adjust existing curriculum to leverage data as entry points into science inquiry, sensemaking, and knowledge for all learners to see themselves in STEM.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, LLC)

Learning with Chicago Youth about Environmental Justice

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W181b


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

While young people are often framed as apathetic towards science class, politics, and the environment, movements like #ClimateStrike demonstrate that quite the opposite is often true. Yet, teachers often do not know how to bring out this type of vigorous engagement in their classes. In this session, learn from students and teachers who have done place-based projects geared towards teaching chemistry, inspiring civic engagement, and working for environmental justice. Recognizing that taking on authentic problems in science class is difficult, the focus of this workshop will rely on honesty, humor, and reflection to learn from each other about how to overcome challenges from complex chemistry content to resistant student attitudes. Using short interactive role plays, this workshop will share lessons we have learned and engage participants in thinking through and acting out what this work looks like in their contexts. With students and teachers as co-facilitators, this workshop seeks to engage educators’ imaginations in bridging sophisticated science learning, student agency, and authentic community involvement.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to navigate scenarios that can encourage or prevent students' overlapping critical engagement in science class and their communities around issues of environmental justice.

SPEAKERS:
Alejandra Frausto Aceves (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Mindy Chappell (North-Grand High School: Chicago, IL), Jasmine Jones (Student)

Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

DCI, CCC, and SEPs, Oh My! Sweet and Salty Investigations with a 3-D Twist!

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
DCI, CCC, and SEPs Oh My! (2).pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Discover how to implement three-dimensional learning into any science curriculum, all while engaging learners to become phenomenal!

TAKEAWAYS:
How to use SEPs to drive student instruction and molecular-level modeling of processes using data to support claim.

SPEAKERS:
Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Becoming AJEDIIs: Teaching and leading STEM education during a pandemic using chemistry and other eqSTrEAM ideas

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W178a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
AJEDII Presentation
Overview of how Historically Responsive Literacy (Muhammad, 2020) is applied to chemistry.
Oil Spill Simulation Inquiry
This is a full description of the oil spill simulation that represents STEM as a key component of "cultivating genius". Integrating STEM meaningfully into lessons as a way to allow students to experience joy while building skills, criticality and intellect.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Building on workshops facilitated by Gholdy Muhammad during the 2020-2021 academic year, STEM teachers will explore how historically responsive literacy can be extended to science teaching and learning. The AJEDII Model considers how accessibility, justice, equity, diversity and identity shape pedagogy. Participants will review the framework, develop units aligned to current student learning standards, and explore resources developed by facilitators for a range of instructional modes and situations. When COVID-19 hit our schools, STEM educators took on the task of processing and fighting misinformation, teaching and training students, parents, colleagues and other adults in their community about a wide range of technical terms and implementing novel pedagogical technologies and techniques like never before. The imagined worlds of science fiction were being realized but the ending still has not been determined and has certainly not been predictable. Unfortunately, the pandemic that became most clear in 2020 was exacerbated by social problems that could no longer be ignored. Participants will leave the session with materials for designing instruction for virtual (asynchronous or synchronous) and face-to-face learning based on facilitators’ experiences.

TAKEAWAYS:
STEM educators will apply Muhammad's (2020) historically responsive framework to secondary STEM education in learning design

SPEAKERS:
Joy Barnes-Johnson (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Shefali Mehta (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Mridula Bajaj (Mount Laurel Schools: Mount Laurel, NJ)

Exploring Energy Forms and Transformations in the Real World

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W185a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

NEED’s Science of Energy stations provide a hands-on approach to experimenting with objects used in student’s daily lives while incorporating scientific processing skills such as making observations, measuring, recording results, compare and contrast, categorize, make predictions, analyze and graph results, and draw conclusions. Workshop participants will rotate through six stations just as their students would in the classroom or OST Program, to learn about the different forms of energy and energy transformations using objects such as a toy car, apple, yo-yo, compass, bouncy ball, glow stick, etc. Using the same materials, the station guides can be easily differentiated for elementary, intermediate, and secondary levels. Each station includes a "What's Happening" article that provides additional informational text on the energy transformation that took place at the station and ties to more real-life examples for further visualization and understanding. The station guides have been correlated to each state’s individual science and math standards, as well as effectively support Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Workshop participants will engage in hands-on experiments just as their students would, using items we encounter in our daily lives that demonstrate energy forms and their transformations and applications to real-life examples for further visualization and understanding.

SPEAKERS:
Cori Nelson (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA)

Data, Tables, Graphs, Oh My! Strategies to Get All Students Doing & Speaking Science

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Access to Resource Document
Complete the Google Form to gain access to the Resource Document and slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

We are naturally curious, prone to ask why? How? What? Unfortunately, somewhere along the way students lose the trust in their voices to ask questions of and from data. But data are what we use to do science and it permeates all aspects of society today. What should we do? Stop teaching the vocabulary of science and data first, and instead leverage classroom-ready strategies to empower students to lead with their innate curiosity to practice critical 21st century data literacy skills and master the science content. Join us to explore connections between our science content, inquiry-based activities, and data skills. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy and student empowerment. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better help students do and communicate science. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall self-identity as a scientist. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century, how students can do a lot more with data than we often think or presume from their science vocabulary alone, and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into 6-12 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, LLC)

It's All Fun and Games in High School Chemistry

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W196c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Chemistry Fun and Games 3 way matter match cards answer key Part 2.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games 3 way matter match rules cards Part 1.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Acid Base Battle answer key Part 3.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Acid Base Battle cards answer key Part 2.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Acid Base Battle rules cards Part 1.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Atomic Inspiration rules cards answers Part 1.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Atomic Inspiration rules cards answers Part 2.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games bondathon rules cards answer key.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games cover - game list- supply list.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Electron Configuration Battleship rules worksheet periodic table.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Element Exchange rules atomic structure script and answer key PT script and answer key.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Equation Exclamations rules cards answer key.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Gas Law Ladder answer key Part 2.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Gas Law Ladder rules game board cards Part 1.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Molar Mass Bingo rules bingo card worksheet answer key.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Nomenclature On A Roll rules worksheet answer key.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Nomenclature On A Roll rules worksheet answer key.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Solutions Vocab Race rules cards answer key.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games ThermoRummy rules cards answer key.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Which Way Does It Go rules cards answer key.pdf
Chemistry Fun and Games Which Way Does It Go rules cards answer key.pdf

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

High school chemistry focuses on the invisible world of the atom, making the learning of chemistry challenging. The vocabulary of chemistry is its own language; forming connections among abstract ideas can be difficult. When incorporated into the curriculum, games provide students with an experience that allows them to gain a better understanding of chemistry concepts. Device-free games allow students to engage with the content and their classmates. Our comprehensive review games for each unit are designed to provide an opportunity for students to problem solve, think critically and work as a team in a growth-mindset environment. Our experience supports the research that low-achieving students and students receiving educational supports find classroom games beneficial. This workshop will provide teachers an opportunity to play games covering the following topics: matter, atomic structure, periodic table, electron configuration, bonding (ionic, covalent, intermolecular), nomenclature, balancing equations, molar mass, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, solutions, gases, equilibrium and acids/bases.

TAKEAWAYS:
EVERYONE plays and learns along the way. Put ideas together, practice communication and teamwork to improve understanding and application of chemistry concepts. Appropriate for all levels of high school chemistry. Electronic resources for games will be available to workshop participants.

SPEAKERS:
Elaine Kollar (New Trier High School, Winnetka Campus: Winnetka, IL), Laura Hessling (New Trier High School, Winnetka Campus: Winnetka, IL), Tracy Smith (New Trier High School, Winnetka Campus: Winnetka, IL)

Exploration Generation: Sensemaking in Rocketry from AIAA, Estes Rockets, and NSTA

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Exploration Generation: Sensemaking in Rocketry Collection

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session will introduce participants to the Exploration Generation Middle School NSTA Playlist. It provides equitable STEM experiences to students and increases educator confidence in teaching rocketry. This two-lesson playlist brings Sensemaking to rocketry by cultivating student curiosity about rockets to drive learning about science ideas related to physics topics. Participants will investigate forces through hands-on engagement, while also learning about rocket safety. Learn how to develop critical skills within your students to prepare them for the careers of tomorrow.

TAKEAWAYS:
The excitement and curiosity generated by model rocket launches can be used to drive student learning about a variety of physical science ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Nicole Bayeur (Estes Industries: , United States)

Meet Me in the Middle, Lite: A Share-a-Thon

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
UIC Teacher Fellows Info
Informational Flyer on Teacher Fellows program to develop classroom learning companion robots

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Engage in a variety of activities, collect information and resources, and network with middle level leaders. Discover new ideas and materials that you can use next week.

TAKEAWAYS:
The participants will network with other middle level science educators and leaders to discover and engage in activities that will expand their knowledge and be usable in all aspects of their work.

SPEAKERS:
Mary Lou Lipscomb (National Middle Level Science Teachers Association: Naperville, IL), Alison Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Carey Dieleman (National Science Teaching Association: No City, No State), Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ), Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA), Suzanne Cunningham (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN), Katy Garvey (The Source for Learning, Inc.: Reston, VA), Nicole Green (Animalearn: Jenkintown, PA), Joseph Michaelis (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Kim Nagle (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Anne Schoeffler (Seton Catholic School: Hudson, OH), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Alison Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Corydon Strawser (Lake Nona Middle School: Orlando, FL), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA), Barbara Phillips-Bredlow (Northeast Nodaway School District: Ravenwood, MO), Dawn Konieczny (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Erin Towns (Edward Little High School: Auburn, ME)

Uncovering Student Misconceptions About Mathematical Models

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W194a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Uncovering Student Misconceptions About Mathematical Models (1).pdf

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Students come into a science classroom with varying or little to no background knowledge. Mathematical modeling in the science classroom is a critical piece of any three-dimensional lesson. Come learn how one science teacher uses real-world student-collected data to make modeling fun and inclusive of all students!

TAKEAWAYS:
Equity in the science/math classroom; data collection and analysis; and mathematical modeling.

SPEAKERS:
Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

inquiryHub Chemistry: A Phenomenon-Driven, Year-Long, 3D High School Course

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

This session provides an overview of inquiryHub Chemistry’s year-long, open-source materials. In the session, designers and pilot teachers will share their experiences adapting their practice to meaningful, equity-oriented chemistry learning using units like “How could we search for life beyond Earth?” “How can a small amount of nuclear material destroy a city but also power it?” and “Why are shellfish dying?”. inquiryHub Chemistry comprises 5 units addressing NGSS high school physical science standards in line with A Framework for K-12 Science Education. inquiryHub Chemistry promotes deep conceptual understanding of chemistry using hands-on manipulatives that show how atoms bond. This session will offer 1) An overview of the year-long sequence of open-source chemistry materials, including units on reactions, periodic trends, and in-depth models of matter and energy 2) a chance to experience one of the most complicated models in the curriculum: the Fuels magnet manipulative models, and 3) opportunities to connect with a national network of educators who have taught inquiryHub Chemistry.

TAKEAWAYS:
Open-source inquiryHub Chemistry materials can be used to promote deep understanding of models and NGSS chemistry ideas

SPEAKERS:
Kerri Wingert (Good Question Research: Boulder, CO)

Discussion-Based Learning: How to Use Talk as a Tool

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Academic discourse is a vital part of promoting student sensemaking. Learn how discourse can be used to promote equity and access in the science classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to use discussion strategies in the classroom to move student thinking forward, use talk as a formative assessment, and build a classroom culture that promotes student discussion.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Cheryl Knight (Orland Junior High School: Orland Park, IL)

How Argument-Driven Inquiry Can Make Learning Experiences More Meaningful, Rigorous, and Equitable

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session introduces a way to create learning experiences that are meaningful, rigorous, and equitable for students. Participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS.

TAKEAWAYS:
The characteristics of learning experiences that are meaningful, relevant, and equitable for students and how to give students an opportunity to use their own ideas along with the DCIs, CCs, and SEPs in the service of sensemaking during these experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

iHub Anchoring Phenomenon Routine Polar Ice Unit

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W196c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Experiencing the iHub Anchoring Phenomenon Routine in the Polar Ice HS Chemistry

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Attendees will experience the Anchoring Phenomenon Routine as students do in iHub’s Polar Ice unit. This routine engages students in asking questions about why people from around the Earth are being displaced from their homes as a starting point in a unit of study focused on how we can slow or stop polar ice from melting before the sea level rises too much. After experiencing the routine, attendees will analyze the routine through an equity lens.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how the iHub curriculum supports teachers in eliciting and making use of students’ own questions and their experiences in instruction, which supports student motivation and agency (Harris, Phillips, & Penuel, 2011).

SPEAKERS:
Rachel Patton (Denver Public Schools), Kathryn Fleegal (Denver Public Schools: Denver, CO), Beth Vinson (Denver Public Schools: Denver, CO)

Light Your Classroom on Fire

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W181c


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

In Jan. 2018 a new partnership formed between Cobb Fire, UL Labs and Cobb County Schools. We joined forces to teach students about Fire Dynamics and career opportunities. This unique partnership allowed teachers and fire fighters to attend professional development together to learn how to implement the UL Fire Dynamics curriculum. Then the teachers and firefighters joined forces in the classroom to support the students as they experimented with fire properties and determined if it was a case of accident or arson. The students then have to submit a Claim, based on evidence they gathered during their research. Their reasoning must be supported. The local arson investigators from Cobb Fire attend the student presentations and give them feedback on the accuracy of their Claims. Students are learning about a variety of STEM applications in the fire service and the teachers are getting time with a variety of content experts. This program has been an excellent opportunity for students to make real world connections to science concepts they are learning in the classroom. Our fire department is using this as an opportunity to cultivate a more inclusive vision for fire service by spotlighting diversity in the fire department.

TAKEAWAYS:
UL's FREE Fire forensic PBL investigation helps students apply what they've learned in class. Fire dynamics are a great phenomena to explore and engage students. Partnerships enhance classroom learning.

SPEAKERS:
Sally Creel (Cobb County School District: Marietta, GA), Amy Gilbert (Griffin Middle School: Smyrna, GA)

Equilibrium Misconceptions Are Best Resolved By Inquiry!

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Chemical equilibrium is a central topic to the understanding of both Chemistry and Biology-yet students have many misconceptions about equilibrium. The NGSS standard HS PS1-6 covers this important topic. In a recent AP Chemistry Exam, the vast majority of students did poorly on the topic of had misconceptions about equilibrium-73 % of the students received a zero or had no response to the equilibrium question. Students are most familiar with equilibrium problems and experiments where the K value is small-usually less than 1. This AP Exam question dealt with a large K value causing the majority of students to do poorly. In this presentation, participants will take part in a “hands on” inquiry activity using appropriate technology to collect and analyze data for a chemical equilibrium having a large K value. Participants will: undertake a “hands on” equilibrium Inquiry with a large K value, use Inquiry to resolve equilibrium misconceptions, & use appropriate technology for data collection/analysis. Join this workshop to take an inquiry lab back to use in your classroom. Handouts will be provided. There will be time allotted for participant questions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn to use Inquiry to overcome student misconceptions about chemical equilibrium.

SPEAKERS:
Gregory Dodd (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Pennsboro, WV)

Modeling Investigation of How Quarks Obtain Mass Through the Interaction of the Higgs Boson

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Each attendee will receive materials and instructions to construct a Higgs Boson. Dice and investigative procedure are included to determine the mass of six quarks.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. How to take an abstract concept and create concrete hands-on investigations; 2. Suggestions to go from teacher-centered to a student centered-curriculum; and 3. The importance of looking for trends, patterns, and regularities for modeling.

SPEAKERS:
Gary Schiltz (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Naperville, IL)

Copper, An Essential Metal: A Two Unit Inquiry!

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Copper is used in plumbing, coinage, and electrical wiring; yet we often take this element for granted. Copper has been known since at least 9000 BC, but many of its reactions and properties have only been determined in recent centuries. This inquiry requires students to: research the chemical reactions of copper (redox, double displacement, and decomposition), apply prior knowledge of stoichiometry and conservation of matter, analyze a copper solution using spectroscopy, and use proper laboratory techniques and skills. NGSS standards HS PS1-2, HS PS1-5, and HS PS1-7 will be addressed. Participants will: Research and design an Inquiry experiment, use technology to collect/analyze data, & visualize what occurs on the submicroscopic level by employing particulate drawings. Join this workshop to take home a two-unit inquiry lab to use in your classroom. This Inquiry is a perfect end-of-course lab practical. There will be time allotted for participant questions. Handouts will be provided.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how Inquiry can be used successfully in their classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Gregory Dodd (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Pennsboro, WV)

The Quantitative and Qualitative Modeling of the Doppler Effect

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The first 50 attendees will be be given the materials (circluar rings, rulers, and paper) to model the Doppler effect. Attendees will need a calculator for the quantitative portion of the workshop.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. How to take an abstract concept and create a concrete hands-on investigation; 2. Suggestions to go from teacher-centered to a student centered-curriculum; and 3. The importance of looking for trends, patterns, and regularities for modeling.

SPEAKERS:
Gary Schiltz (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Naperville, IL)

Problem Centered Teaching by Tomorrow

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation Link

STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Problem centered instruction is a great way to engage students, integrate content, inspire learning, and naturally incorporate all three dimensions of the NRC Framework. However, true problem centered instruction requires a major shift in both teaching and learning, requiring the one thing teachers don't have: time--the last thing teachers need is another pedagogical strategy that disrupts their entire routine. Teachers will have the opportunity to voice their concerns and discuss some barriers of problem centered teaching and learning, while also addressing the benefits for both teachers and students. Considering the benefits, there are some immediate changes that teachers can use to help shift to a problem centered environment. Recalling that problem centered learning should be complex, meaningful, and open-ended, the four strategies are: 1) Make the Content Relatable, 2) Structure: Less is More, 3) Be a Resource, Not an Answer Key, and 4) Use a Problem to Introduce a Topic. Teachers will then have an opportunity to put the strategies to immediate use by picking a lesson or topic and work with others to transform it into a three-dimensional, problem centered lesson.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will explore four strategies that promote three-dimensional learning through the process of problem centered instruction that is complex, meaningful, and open-ended. They will discuss benefits and barriers to the problem centered approach from the perspective of both the instructor and the learner. Teachers will have an opportunity to brainstorm and work collaboratively on transforming a lesson or topic of their choice into a problem centered, reality based scenario that seamlessly integrates the Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Cassandra Armstrong (Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy: Aurora, IL)

Nourish the Future: Energy and Biofuels

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Nourish the Future Energy Biofuels slide deck
Nourish the Future Fermentation Factories Student Lesson
Nourish the Future Fermentation Factories Teacher Document

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Students utilize different components (enzymes, yeast, feed stocks, and water) to produce ethanol and carbon dioxide through the process of fermentation. Students will develop a model of fermentation and explain how ethanol is made to answer the focus question "How can fermentation produce a renewable fuel source?" Students will develop experimental models to generate data in order to construct explanations about the relationships between the components of the fermentation process and to predict how those relationships can be manipulated to produce carbon dioxide. Students will design solutions to make the fermentation process as efficient as possible and generate the maximum amount of ethanol in a small bag environment Attendees will participate in hands-on activities centered around biofuel. Participants are going to prepare and compare different amounts of fermentation occurring in four different mixtures which will allow observations of production rates. A second activity focuses on a way to make a qualitative or quantitative explanation regarding the relationship between feed stock and glucose availability for ethanol production. Participants will deconstruct a model of starch to examine enzyme and starch reactions to determine how starches change into smaller molecules. Three additional hands-on activities that can be included in your classroom curriculum will be discussed.

TAKEAWAYS:
Nourish the Future is a national education initiative developed by science teachers for science teachers to connect students to modern agriculture and provide sound science based resources that meet teacher and student needs in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Tiska Rodgers (Clarkton High School: Clarkton, MO), Leanne Thele (Perryville High School: , MO)

A Unique and Challenging Ice Core Investigation that Integrates the Three Dimensions of NGSS & STEM

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
A JS9 Image Analysis Analysis Investigation
This JS9 investigation is an excellent extension for the Ice Core Activity to help determine the date of the Cas A supernova event.
Ice Core Records Investigation Student Handout
Ice Core Records Presentation
Ice Core Records.pdf
Ice Core Webinar for Educators
Jamboard Online Version of Ice Core Records
This version makes it easier for groups to work together individually and in a group to share their progress.
The Ice Core Records Investigation from the Earth Scientist Magazine
This article provides an overview of the Ice Core Materials for Educators.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

The GISP2 H-Core was collected in 1992 adjacent to the Greenland Ice Sheet Project Two (GISP2) drill site. The GISP2-H 125.6-meter firm and ice core is a record of 430 years of liquid electrical conductivity and nitrate concentrations. The liquid electrical conductivity sequence contains signals from a number of known volcanic eruptions that provide a dating system at specific locations along the core. The terrestrial and solar background nitrate records show seasonal and annual variations – as well as unique events. Several major nitrate anomalies within the record do not correspond to any known terrestrial or solar events, and there is compelling evidence that some nitrate anomalies within the GISP2 H-Core could possibly be a record of supernova events. This investigation provides participants with a better understanding of the scientific process of analyzing data and developing models to construct knowledge, and defending the results. Sometimes there is no answer key, only possible solutions from analyzing and constructing knowledge from multiple sources that cross traditional disciplines. The materials focus on NGSS scientific practices, crosscutting concepts and the Earth and space sciences core disciplinary ideas – including analyzing and interpreting data, patterns, cycles of energy and matter, Earth systems and Earth and human activity.

TAKEAWAYS:
In constructing new knowledge, sometimes there is no definitive answer, only plausible conclusions based on constructing, analyzing, and comparing data and research from multiple disciplines.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Young (NASA/NSO/UoL Program Manager: Laughlin, NV)

DIY Digital Interactive Notebooking

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/16a_AiBztWiON2awmsWMd0b2t9v38sgubMxBB_OVxHRI/edit?usp=sharing

STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

Are you used to having your students keep a notebook, but aren’t sure how to transition it into a digital version? Have you ever wanted to try an Interactive Notebook but don’t know where to start? Are you having trouble keeping your students organized in the digital school world? Interactive Notebooks are a meaningful way to transfer a student’s learning, practice, and reflection into an engaging digital environment. Research has shown that benefits range from allowing students space to record and reflect on their experiences, guiding teacher instruction, and providing more opportunities for differentiation. As classes have shifted between in-person, hybrid, and completely online instruction, digital learning options are becoming an even more necessary part of our curriculum. During this workshop, you will learn about different types of digital notebooks, their uses/benefits, and how to find or create your own resources for student use. By converting an interactive notebook into a digital notebook, students can now access multi-media resources all in one place creating opportunities for greater flexibility and autonomy in learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Create and manage digital notebooks resources from materials you already use.

SPEAKERS:
Joy Barnes-Johnson (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Mridula Bajaj (Mount Laurel Schools: Mount Laurel, NJ), Shefali Mehta (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ)

Using CERs and CEJs to Develop Student Discourse and Discussion

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Come learn how to teach in three dimensions and advance students’ scientific literacy by strategically applying the use of CERs and CEJs in your classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
After this session, participants will be able to identify opportunities for using CERs and CEJs to facilitate student discourse and discussion and apply what they have learned to their own classroom.

SPEAKERS:
McKenna Serowka (Lake Zurich High School: Lake Zurich, IL)

NESTA and SSSA: Know Soil, Know Life—Dig into the Connections!

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

More than just dirt, soil is vital to life on the planet. Join us as we explore the how’s and why’s of the soil-life connection.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn the fundamental linkages between soils and life while being immersed in numerous activities and demonstrations that support classroom integration of soil topics.

SPEAKERS:
Clay Robinson (CRC Consulting: No City, No State), Susan Chapman (Soil Science Society of America: Madison, WI)

Designing Escape Boxes

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate Initiative, and Kikim Media

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate In

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session will introduce participants to Our Beautiful Planet, a collection of classroom-ready films and lesson plans that highlight the science and engineering practices scientists use to explain the phenomenon of climate change. The collection of over 10 lessons brings Sensemaking to environmental science by cultivating student curiosity with engaging and eye-popping phenomena. Participants will generate questions and use model data as evidence to construct an explanation of how increases in global temperature could shift infection rates of mosquito-borne diseases. Using their explanation and information provided in the film, participants will consider the effect of this shift on humans.

TAKEAWAYS:
Providing students with an engaging and relevant phenomenon can be used to drive student learning about climate change and inspire them to examine critical climate issues in their own communities.

SPEAKERS:
Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

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