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2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 46 results

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Using tools to sense and interact with the environment

McCormick Place - W193a

After learning about computational thinking, participants will apply the framework to determine where students engage in computational thinking within the activity. Participants will engage in activities where students engineer as part of the investigations. Participants will be able to use a pre-programmed microcontroller (loaned by the presenters) to experience 3 different short investigations each tied to a different phenomenon. 1) Does angle matter? How does the angle of the collector affect how warm it is? Using the microcontroller and lamps participants will collect data to build a model that explains why the tilt of the Earth creates different seasons. 2) Transparent, Translucent, and Opaque. When working in a greenhouse, different materials can be used to cover the greenhouse. Which is the best material for your area? Using the light level sensor on the microcontroller, participants test different materials to recommend their uses when designing a greenhouse. 3) Making an alarm - using the microcontroller accelerometer sensor, participants arm an alarm and see how the accelerometer works in three dimensions. Participants will be provided printed copies of the lesson plans and how to engage students with using the microcontrollers. Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment brought is necessary to participate in this workshop.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn (1) Microcontrollers are small computers that come with several integrated sensors. Their functionality makes them useful for both investigations and engineering projects. Some of the basic functionality of different microcontrollers (2) One definition of computation thinking is how to use computers to solve problems. Computational thinking activities that connect students to everyday phenomena. The development of algorithms or the decomposition of problems into simple steps are just two examples of processes associated with computation thinking. It is a powerful problem-solving technique that is used in the modern world (3) How engineering tasks provide opportunities for student sensemaking

Speakers

Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Using tools to sense and interact with the environment.pdf

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Dog Mode Design Challenge

McCormick Place - W185a

Introducing students to real-world engineering problems is a key component to engaging them in the science classroom. In this project, students solve the problem of saving pets from a hot car. Many students are aware of this issue and would have many ideas on how this could be achieved. This projects gives them the tools to help solve such a problem by building a model and finding a solution. Participants in this session will get to build the model themselves to see how information from sensors (input) can determine what should be done (output) through simple lines of code. No coding or engineering experience is needed, just imagination and logical thinking. Projects like these can expose students to STEM Careers. The exposure to coding and engineering design can also get them interested in doing more in the STEM field.

Takeaways: Solve a real-work problem with coding and engineering design - no prior experience needed.

Speakers

Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Dog Mode Slide Deck

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Supporting Civically Engaged Argument Writing in Science and Technology Classrooms

McCormick Place - W178b

Participants will use a graphic organizer to record their thinking as I describe a unit I taught in which students in grades 9-12 explored issues related to artificial intelligence. Students crafted op-Eds advocating for what we should do in our community about emerging technologies like driverless cars and facial recognition. As I describe the unit, I will highlight how I (1) kicked off the unit with a phenomenon that raised questions about convenience, safety, security, equity, and justice; (2) layered on texts and encouraged students to grapple with multiple perspectives on AI-related issues; (3) used routines and mentor texts to support students in crafting claims and connecting evidence to their claims; and (4) engaged students in processes of revision. Then, participants will work in self-selected groups to explore science/technology/society text sets on topics like lab grown meat and space debris. As they explore the text set, they will engage with a classroom routine to develop a compelling, debatable, defensible, and nuanced claim. Participants will share what they discovered as they explored the text set and wrote claims in their group and will reflect on how these text sets and routines might become part of their classroom practice.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about freely available text sets and classroom routines developed by teachers for supporting civically engaged argument writing about science and technology issues in society.

Speakers

John Smith (Chester A Arthur School: Philadelphia, PA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Guided Session Notes and Resources

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Engineering Severe Weather Solutions

McCormick Place - W176c

Human activities have caused changes in global temperature and weather patterns. This generation of students will need to understand climate science in order to adapt to this changing environment. In this session, participants will explore a project in which students incorporate engineering and basic coding - no experience necessary. We will use micro:bit technology to connect basic coding commands to collect authentic data using embedded sensors. Participants will use this collected data to modify design solutions based on human vulnerabilities to severe weather. Participants will find ways to expose their students to the engineering capabilities needed to solve problems. This project allows students to compare design solutions to identify which is best for the problem at hand and experience the interactive process of evaluating solutions. This project allows for the authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

Takeaways: Use technology to expose students to coding and engineering design solutions for severe weather.

Speakers

Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Sever Weather Slide Deck

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Broaden Science Participation: Unpack “Analyze & Interpret” to Teach Data As an Equalizer

McCormick Place - W179b

We live in a data-driven world, and our students will be working in a data-driven workforce. Therefore, it is critical that our Pre-K-12 students learn foundational data literacy skills. However, currently these skills are too often only taught in upper-level classes. All students need these skills and all students, down to our little Pre-Kers, can work with and make sense of science data. Let’s make sure data is an equalizer, rather than another divider in our educational system and society! Join us as we explore what perception and learning science tell us about how our brains process data. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources to build science knowledge and self-efficacy through data. Finally, we will explore ways to adapt our existing curriculum activities and data visualizations to help our students more equitably access science. Through hands-on activities and group discussions, participants will leave more empowered to leverage data and data visualizations into their science content in purposeful ways for all learners. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall 21st century skills. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

Takeaways: Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century for all students and ways to adjust existing curriculum to leverage data as entry points into science inquiry, sensemaking, and knowledge for all learners to see themselves in STEM.

Speakers

Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document and a slide deck from the workshop.

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Half-Earth Project Inclusive Mapping Design Challenge and Hummingbird Guided Inquiry

McCormick Place - W196a

The Half-Earth Project team-based Mapping Design Challenge engages students in authentic teamwork to use digital mapping to design their own biodiversity conservation choices.

Takeaways: Digital mapping motivated by exploring charismatic species draws diverse students into the multidisciplinary science of conservation decision-making where species, human impacts, and stakeholders have to be considered.

Speakers

Dennis Liu (E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation: Durham, NC)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Making A Career In Science Education In 2022

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Confused about what to do post COVID? Thinking about switching careers? Learn about the experiences, challenges, and mistakes made by several esteemed science education leaders in this engaging and interactive panel discussion. This panel will feature current and former teachers, school leaders, district leaders, consultants, academics, national STEM education leaders.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about the increasing number of opportunities available for educators both inside and outside of the classroom.

Speakers

Michael Lach (The University of Chicago: Highland Park, IL)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Intergrated Project and Inquiry Based High School Science Curriculum

McCormick Place - W175c

Explore curriculum of a 10th grade integrated chemistry and biology course that was designed to incorporate the Next Generation Science Standards while placing importance on the Science and Engineering Practices. The course follows the narrative: “Living systems obey the laws of physics and chemistry. Transformations in matter occur in predictable ways and are a function of molecular shape and molecular collisions. Chemical properties are the result of the arrangement of elements and the forces between them. Reception, sequestration, and transfer of chemical elements allow living systems to leverage chemical transformations to survive, grow, and reproduce. Reproduction allows for the transmission of these traits from one generation to the next. Pressures from the environment favors some traits over others which in turn produces new species over time and is responsible for the diversity of all life.” Students were introduced to content via phenomenon and then engaged with the DCIs, Cross-cutting concepts, and SEPs while working towards a culminating project. For example, students learned various topics of chemistry including stoichiometry and gas laws to design and build a functional Class B fire extinguisher. Following this unit, students applied their understanding of cellular respiration, photosynthesis and the carbon cycle to calculate the amount of carbon sequestered on a section of campus trees.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to use phenomena and a 3D design approach to create project -based, integrated Curriculum that assesses SEPS equally with content. Participants will learn how to use student-centered pedagogical practices, hands-on exploration, and more authentic assessment practices. Participants will be familiar with how Integrating biology, chemistry and environmental standards in order to explore an authentic, real-world problem or challenge increases student engagement and performance.

Speakers

Elizabeth Helfant (Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School: Saint Louis, MO)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Computational Thinking and Coding in the Science Classroom

McCormick Place - W474b

Sponsoring Company: PASCO scientific

Bridging the gap between science and coding can be challenging without the proper support. In this workshop, you'll learn how to use block-based coding as part of your existing physical and life science activities by integrating it into students' data collection process. Learn how you can help students develop computational thinking skills alongside science literacy without reinventing your curriculum.

Takeaways: Learn how to incorporate block-based coding into your current physical and life science activities.

Speakers

Barbara Pugliese (PASCO Scientific: Roseville, CA), Jonathan Hanna (PASCO Scientific: Roseville, CA)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Installation Science Exhibits as Assessment Options

McCormick Place - W187c

To help develop more scientifically curious and literate students, we use scientific literature or documentaries to engage students in developing the NGSS science practices. Students find an interesting topic, generate a question, collect and analyze data and then develop a Science Installation that communicates their learning to the greater community. Our most recent class project had students study how to grow food in a simulated Mars environment with the conditions controlled by student programmed raspberry pis. High school students organized 6th graders to do hands on data collection. They created a 10x12 foot exhibit that looked like a Martian landscape and highlighted the equipment they used with the plants still growing. The display included QR codes to communicate data and research using student-created videos, infographics, and data tables. Other installations include a monochromatic yellow room where everything looks grey and allowed observers to learn about the properties of light and the ways light energy is used in photosynthesis, the way it can be used to promote electrons, and the way it produces color. Other exhibits include sound waves and a history or music and musical instruments, the chemistry of color, and an environmental study of our use of carbon.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to guide students in the reading of scientific literature or the watching of documentaries in order to generate an authentic question and project. (How can we develop the capacity to farm on Mars? How does yellow monochromatic light produce the absence of color (an episode of Abstract, What can we learn about pollen structure from 3D printed files from Bayer’s agricultural division?) Participants will review a process to take the question and generate an authentic study that transcends a single class, grade, or discipline. (Students in 11th grade worked with students in 6th grade to test growing plants under controlled conditions that simulated Mars. Students in art and physics classes explored the properties of light and created a light-based art exhibit with science lessons on QR codes) Participants will explore a template for guiding students through the creation of an installation/exhibit that creatively shows the question, their experiment, their analysis, and potential solutions or conclusions in a creative and community-informing way. The exhibit is similar to an art installation with QR codes and experiment/study artifacts presented in a museum like scenario.

Speakers

Elizabeth Helfant (Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School: Saint Louis, MO)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Evaluating STEM Curricula with Equity and Inclusivity in Mind

McCormick Place - W178b

Explore EiE’s curriculum design principles for inclusivity and NSTA’s sensemaking pillars as tools to evaluate curricula for inclusivity and equity.

Takeaways: Participants will leave this session with a framework for evaluating curricula with equity and inclusivity in mind.

Speakers

Diana Christopherson (Museum of Science, Boston: Boston, MA)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Solid Composite Propellant Model Rocket Science Education

McCormick Place - W194b

Sponsoring Company: AeroTech/Quest, Div. of RCS Rocket Motor Component

Explore the differences between aerospace-grade solid composite propellant model rocket motors and traditional black powder model rocket motors in science education, STEM programs, TARC Competition, and collegiate rocket team activities. We'll assemble a Quest Astra III model rocket kit during the workshop to take back to your classroom.

Takeaways: In model rocket science education, AeroTech/Quest products have been "STEM from the beginning!”™

Speakers

Dane Boles (AeroTech / Quest Divison of RCS Rocket Motor Components, Inc.: , United States)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Strategies to Improve Communications in Inclusive Classrooms

McCormick Place - W181c

Improve inclusive classroom dynamics between teachers, families, and students by reflecting on disability model perspectives, identifying barriers to collaboration, and determining effective avenues of communication.

Takeaways: The triangle of inclusion presents pathways that can be used by administrators and teachers to recognize and overcome barriers faced within the inclusive classroom and includes strategies such as early open communications, student advocacy, professional learning opportunities, and mentorships.

Speakers

Nicole Wack (East Penn School District: Emmaus, PA)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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STEMscopes Showcase: What’s New at STEMscopes?

McCormick Place - W470a

Sponsoring Company: STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning

If you're using STEMscopes (or wanna-be), this session is for you. Come see examples of the EXCITING and NEW ASPECTS to the most popular digital science curriculum during this showcase. Discover program enhancements, Google integration, streaming, coding, engineering, and much more.

Takeaways: Learn about STEMscopes' various components and programs by experienced users in a hands-on setting.

Speakers

Kenneth Heydrick (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Amanda McGee (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Ashley Mathis (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Bobby Barron (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Jacque Garcia (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Tammy Motley (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

STEMscopes-2022-July21-STEMscopes-Showcase-NSTA.pdf

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Expanding Participation and Success in STEM Teaching Through Partnerships

McCormick Place - W181a

Ideas and concrete strategies for building collaborative, generative partnerships with community groups, nonprofits, preK–12 schools, museums, and community colleges in order to transform the STEM ecosystem and preservice teachers' futures will be shared.

Takeaways: Participants will: 1. hear from different partners about the generative ways we have collaborated to increase diversity in our STEM teacher preparation program; 2. engage in discussion and planning next steps for reaching out to a potential collaborative partner; and 3. learn about the ways in which preservice STEM Noyce Scholars have strengthened their STEM Identity and have been prepared to design culturally sustaining curricula and classrooms that integrate sensemaking.

Speakers

Sydney Worthen-Jenkins (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Nicole Hebert (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Bonnie Maur (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Kristin Rainville (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Integrating CS into Science Storylines

McCormick Place - W176c

Science teachers at Lindblom Math and Science Academy in Chicago Public Schools have worked with Northwestern University’s CT-STEM department to develop computational thinking in science units aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards. The goal is for students to understand and apply computational thinking practices in their science classrooms to help make sense of phenomena or problems, analyze data, use models and develop explanations. Units, built by teachers, are designed to cover core science concepts in physics, chemistry, and biology. This program allows teachers to work with CT-STEM members to develop new simulations or other CT activities that work best in the unit. This was developed based on teacher need, when simulations didn’t exist to address the big ideas. Integration of NetLogo models, SageModeler, NetTango, and other data analysis activities are used to help students make real world connections. These tools allow students to learn and apply basic computer science ideas and skills as well as the 3-D of NGSS. Developed unit topics include: stoichiometry, climate change, gas laws, and energy. These units are available for public use and can be easily modified on the CT-STEM platform for teachers to use.

Takeaways: Overview of how teachers integrated Computational Thinking into science units and how to access units for Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Earth Science

Speakers

Carole Namowicz (Lindblom Math and Science Academy: Chicago, IL), Lauren Levites (Lindblom Math and Science Academy: Chicago, IL)

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Build a K–12 STEAM Pipeline Through Family STEAM Night

McCormick Place - W180

Engage students, families, and the community in STEAM through Family STEAM Nights in order to equitably build understanding and interest in STEAM.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to create, recruit, and implement a Family STEAM Night to engage students, families, and the community in STEAM.

Speakers

McKenna Serowka (Lake Zurich High School: Lake Zurich, IL)

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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CMU CS Academy: Free Python Courses and Teacher Tools for the CS and STEM Classroom

McCormick Place - W175a

Come learn about a free CS curriculum for teachers with Carnegie Mellon University's CS Academy: Creative and Exiting Tools for STEM Classrooms Using Python.

Takeaways: Learn how to create your accounts and the different types of Python courses available, all free of charge. You can use the curriculum immediately upon account creation for small projects or entire classes.

Speakers

Sofia De Jesus (Carnegie Mellon University: Pittsburgh, PA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

CMU CS Academy Free Python Courses for Middle School and High School

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Building a Better ADI Understanding: Using Student-Created Avatars to Explain Past Scientist Experiences with ADI

McCormick Place - W176a

This presentation reviews students researching and presenting on past ADI events in science through the creation of scientist avatars.

Takeaways: 1. This session highlights the use of a classroom-tested assignment where students are asked to create a personal avatar where they are pretending to be the actual scientist; and 2. The assignment works well to show actual ADI events that explain how science changes over time.

Speakers

William Sumrall (The University of Mississippi: University, MS)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Integrating Computer Science into Science Courses Without Losing Your Mind

McCormick Place - W175a

Computer science CAN be integrated into high school science classes. Here are some ideas from the STEMcoding Project!

Takeaways: Attendees will work on three "STEMcoding" activities on: 1. climate change with connection to spreadsheets; 2. orbital motion for Earth science; and 3. the first of the "physics of video games" activities.

Speakers

Chris Orban (The Ohio State University at Marion: Marion, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Orban_nsta22.pdf

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Python Coding with Vernier Sensors

McCormick Place - W471b

Sponsoring Company: Vernier Software & Technology

Learn how to integrate Vernier sensor data into Python coding. Explore how coding can enhance your students’ experience in the science classroom by providing another avenue of engagement. Teachers of science and coding alike will benefit from this hands-on workshop.

Takeaways: 1. Gain experience with hands-on technology that encourages students to explore and test different solutions and make connections to the real world; 2. Get access to free resources to keep students engaged while learning key scientific concepts either remotely or in the lab; and 3. Gain hands-on experiences with innovative products that increase student engagement, promote creativity and collaboration, and develop problem-solving skills.

Speakers

Tom Smith (Vernier Software & Technology: Beaverton, OR), Dave Vernier (Vernier Software & Technology: Beaverton, OR)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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The Scoop on STEM Competitions Administered by NSTA

McCormick Place - W176a

Join us for a chance to learn more about  NSTA-administered competitions and awards from NSTA staff and past participants. NSTA-administered competitions include NSTA Teacher Awards, the Army Educational Outreach Program, Shell Science Lab Regional Challenge, and Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision competitions. This engaging hour will include discussion and tips on how to engage K–12 students in project-based learning opportunities that are no cost to participate.

Takeaways: 1. Engage with educators that have participated in NSTA-administered competitions and awards; 2. Learn more about opportunities to engage students in project-based learning; and 3. Share best practices and tips to foster inquiry-based learning and showcase ideas.

Speakers

Acacia McKenna (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Competitions_ presentation.pdf

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Speed Sharing: Building Apps and Computer Science

McCormick Place - W185b-c

1) Building Apps in Science…No Code Required
In this presentation, I will share how students can create their own digital apps for science. No code is required, and apps can be shared and used all year long!

2) Developing an Entrepreneurship Infused Digital Fabrication Course at Millikin University
We will explore the iterative development of an entrepreneurship infused honors seminar aimed at introducing a diverse population of students to digital fabrication technologies and their varied applications.

3) Promoting Student Voice in an Elementary Computer Science Classroom
Discover how student input and voice can shape equitable computer science experiences while promoting critical thinking in the Elementary Computer Science Classroom.

 

Speakers

Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH), Kyle Knust (Millikin University: Decatur, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Leah LaCrosse NSTA Bulb Page
This page will lead to presentation materials in pdf form.

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Learning Better Science Practices with Science Fair Projects

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 5

A former national science fair judge provides insights on how good titles can improve the odds of winning at science fairs. The poster will describe what the parts of a "good" title are and how teachers can help your students create one.

Takeaways: Teachers will learn the components of a good project title (from an research project on science fairs) and how to help their students develop a good title for their own project.

Speakers

G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Global Conversations: International Film Festival and Share-a-thon

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 21

In this self-directed session, you will be able to: Interact with educators in face-to-face poster presentations; Watch short video submissions from educators around the world; and Participate in hands-on/minds-on, takeaway learning experiences.

Takeaways: Science education occurs everywhere on this planet. We can get ideas and best practices from collegues around the world.

Speakers

Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Using Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in the Elementary School Science Classroom

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 22

Learn how to embed future ready skills through the science and engineering practices

Takeaways: During this session, teachers will learn how to use artificial intelligence and machine learning to actively engage students in the science and engineering practices.

Speakers

Kristin Luthi (Gwinnett County Public Schools: Suwanee, GA)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Using Drones in the Classroom For Land and Crop Surveying Simulations

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 10

This session will lead participants through a discussion on why and how to use drone technology in the classroom. It will showcase a problem based learning activity in which drones are used in a surveying simulation.

Takeaways: How and why using drones can enhance the curriculum.

Speakers

Jane Hunt (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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STEM + Empathy in Use in the Design of an Improved Bionic Arm

McCormick Place - W185d

Empathic engineering design can help develop students’ cultural competence as well as inform the design of more useful innovations for people with limb differences.

Takeaways: School-based activities that are oriented toward improving community members’ lives can simultaneously support the development of students’ cultural competence and integrated STEM literacy.

Speakers

Susan Meabh Kelly (University of Connecticut: Storrs Mansfield, CT), Brittany Klimowicz (NYC iSchool: New York, NY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Slides
Session slides with links to all resources and contact information

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Sparking Interest in Computer Science with Unplugged Activities

McCormick Place - W473

Sponsoring Company: SAE International

With more states requiring computer science (CS) education for K-12 students, integrating computer science with other subject areas in a problem-based format is a practical way to expand students’ opportunities. Participants will learn about teaching “unplugged” lessons that support comprehension and application of concepts, to collaborative explorations that promote teamwork, creative problem-solving, and critical thinking. This interactive workshop will introduce AWIM’s CS curriculum series (including computational thinking, cybersecurity, and digital citizenship concepts) to demonstrate interactive methods for introducing students to basic computer programming and logic...even without computer access.

Takeaways: Discover activities, methods, and resources for facilitating effective & engaging computer science lessons independent of technology access.

Speakers

Bonnie Thibodeau (SAE International: Warrendale, PA)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Build a Heart with STEM...and Play-Doh!

McCormick Place - W194b

Sponsoring Company: Texas Instruments

You will learn how to build and code a four-chambered heart (no coding experience required) while learning about how the heart works. This is a great project for middle and high school science and STEM students!

Takeaways: Science and Engineering practices can be achieved in a practical and engaging process that requires students to apply science knowledge while developing some STEM skills.

Speakers

Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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NSTA/ISTA Session- Bridging the Gap: Connecting STEM/Science Learning in CTE

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Student understanding of how science and STEM ideas and concepts are applied within their chosen career pathway is a critical component of many Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs, but for a variety of reasons these connections are often overlooked. Some states even provide CTE courses and Career Pathway standards that seem to go against the three-dimensional and student-centered learning grain. Yet, to truly meet the vision of the K-12 Framework, students in CTE and Vocational Education pathways should also be provided opportunities to engage in three-dimensional sensemaking in the context of their CTE course. In this session, we explore explicit connections between three-dimensional science learning and Agricultural, Food and Natural Resources as just one example of how three-dimensional student learning and sensemaking can be incorporated into CTE. We then explore how similar strategies can be utilized in other pathways with the goal of bridging the gap between science learning and practical application for students in CTE.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn strategies for integrating scientific sensemaking into CTE courses to support their students' mastery of the scientific concepts they will apply in those fields.

Speakers

Bridina Lemmer (Illinois Science Teaching Association: Jacksonville, IL), Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Bridging the GAP

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Easily Understand Recursion through Natural Phenomena

McCormick Place - W187c

Recursion is a challenging topic for some students. In this session, we’ll present a blended approach to introducing recursion, wherein a textual description of natural phenomena is presented in an easy-to-understand, attractive, and informative graphic format. Fundamental rules of production systems are also presented, all in a format specifically targeted to high school students. Students generally gain mastery of this topic within a few weeks through this approach, achieving both a deep understanding of the concepts and a rewarding sense of accomplishment. As a bonus, they usually enjoy the topic and appreciate the opportunity this approach gives them to be creative.

Takeaways: How to enable students to be creative while learning about recursion

Speakers

David Ben-Yaakov (Educator: Allen, TX)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation Deck

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Getting Carried Away: The UpLab

McCormick Place - W176a

Using the Dual Range Force Sensor, participants will determine how many helium balloons are needed to lift themselves and the house from Disney’s film Up.

Takeaways: 1. Using the phenomenon of the helium balloon lifted house from the movie "Up," attendees will leave with a lab using the Dual Range Force Sensor to determine the amount of balloons needed to lift themselves and the house; and 2. the session will show how this can be used for any level of student, and as a bonus will also incorporate how the data collection and analysis can be collected using Python coding.

Speakers

Todd Graba (Crystal Lake South High School: Crystal Lake, IL), Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Engaging with Your STEM Ecosystem Through After-School Programs: Lessons from Science Olympiad

McCormick Place - W179b

A challenge that STEM education presents to educators is how to stay current in an ever-evolving field to accurately represent and engage their students with new topics, activities, and careers. Too often STEM teachers become locked-in on a set of topics, activities, and careers because of the resources and opportunities to which they have access. After-school programs, and their ability to foster partnerships within a school’s larger STEM ecosystem, are one mechanism to open up STEM programs within schools to new topics, activities, and careers while offering avenues for professional growth and learning for the classroom teacher. By introducing the Science Olympiad program and the strategies used by our school participants for over three decades to build partnerships, connect to their STEM ecosystem, and expand learning we intend to help attendees draw parallels to their STEM ecosystems and their after-school programs. Building off of this information, attendees will analyze and discuss ways their STEM ecosystem can contribute to their STEM program, develop approaches for asking ecosystem members for support, and recognize opportunities to grow their STEM program through after-school programs. The session will close with a discussion of attendees’ specific challenges and issues ensuring attendees leave with actionable solutions.

Takeaways: The big takeaway from this session will attendees examining their STEM ecosystem to identify potential partners who align with their programming and can support student learning.

Speakers

John Loehr (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Feeling Moody?

McCormick Place - W194b

Sponsoring Company: Texas Instruments

We will bring science and coding together as participants learn to do some basic coding (no experience necessary) while developing a mood ring! The science of color mixing is explored while determining the right body temperature thresholds. Is fuchsia flirty? Should green be groovy? It’s up to you!

Takeaways: Educators will learn how to incorporate STEM/coding skills (no coding experience necessary) with science concepts to create a highly engaging lesson for students that tackles many of the science and engineering practices.

Speakers

Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way of doing the right thing

McCormick Place - W175c

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way to engage the community in STEM. Participants will hear from educators that have won money for their school and communities to implement STEM action projects.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how they can receive cash awards and acknowledge for STEM action projects.

Speakers

John Anderson (Toshiba America Foundation: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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STEMscopes Showcase: What’s New at STEMscopes?

McCormick Place - W470a

Sponsoring Company: STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning

If you're using STEMscopes (or wanna-be), this session is for you. Come see examples of the EXCITING and NEW ASPECTS to the most popular digital science curriculum during this showcase. Discover program enhancements, Google integration, streaming, coding, engineering, and much more.

Takeaways: Learn about STEMscopes' various components and programs by experienced users in a hands-on setting.

Speakers

Kenneth Heydrick (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Amanda McGee (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Ashley Mathis (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Bobby Barron (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Jacque Garcia (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Tammy Motley (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

STEMscopes-2022-July22-STEMscopes-Showcase-NSTA (1).pdf

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Storytime STEM-packs: Connecting Children's Literature with STEM + Computer Science

McCormick Place - W190b

Sponsoring Company: Storytime STEM-packs

Let’s go on a Storytime STEM adventure! Each Storytime STEM+C Adventure uses children’s literature to equitably and actively engage children in science, mathematics, engineering, and computer science activities.  Get immersed in a storybook and then program a Bee-Bot robot to complete challenges connected to the story on a colorful story-themed mat. Experience first-hand some of the tools we have developed to support young children as they think through and document their program to allow for debugging their code if Bee-Bot goes astray. As part of the session, we will engage in an engineering design challenge and uncover the important math and science concepts featured in the Storytime STEM-pack. Independent evaluator reports show that children love Storytime STEM-packs and teachers appreciate that they are standards-aligned and user friendly. If you are looking for effective materials that make learning fun and engaging for kids, come join us and check out our integrated Storytime STEM + Computer Science Adventures!

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to use children's literature to equitably and actively engage children in STEM+C activities.

Speakers

Michele Burgess , Kristen Rice (Allegheny Intermediate Unit 3: Homestead, PA)

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Cultural Competence Matters: Improving Cultural Competence through Effective Interpersonal Communication

McCormick Place - W185b-c

Culturally relevant pedagogy embodies a professional, political, cultural, ethnical, and ideological disposition that supersedes mundane teaching acts; it is centered in fundamental beliefs about teaching, learning, students, their families, and their communities, and an unyielding commitment to see student success become less rhetoric and more of a reality. This session will aid in building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning. In this session, we will exhibit how to identify the key characteristics of culturally responsive lessons. Attendees will acquire lesson design methods that employ cultural competence and effective communication. Attendees will use collaborate boards during the presentation to respond and interact. Activities to exhibit how students identify with what they know in the classroom will be utilized to help educators make connections and apply this information when planning lessons.

Takeaways: Building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning.

Speakers

Kelly Haynes (Baker High School: Baker, LA), Jennifer Norwood (Instructional Support Specialist: , 0), Tara Hollins (Exceptional Student Services Educator: Zachary, LA)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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NASA Space Technology: Robotics and the International Space Station

McCormick Place - W185d

This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Learning Launchers: Robotics (https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/stem-on-station/learning_launchers_robotics) teacher toolkit part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help bring the International Space Station into the classroom. This session will focus on the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity that engages participants to build and test a robotic-like hand and understand how NASA uses robotic explorers to collect information about places where humans cannot travel. After watching videos "Robotics and the International Space Station" & "Benefits For Humanity: From Space to Surgery" participants will work in teams to construct a robotic-like hand and test their robotic hand by picking up an empty soda can or other lightweight objects. The “I Want to Hold Your Hand Activity” is aligned to national standards for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) (i.e., NGSS, ISTE). The focus of the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity ties Engineering Design and NGSS science and engineering practices of defining problems, developing models, and planning and carrying out investigations. This session connects participants to how NASA uses robots in many ways as well as benefit humanity with its robots’ doing science and experiments aboard the International Space Station.

Takeaways: 1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Attendees will gain hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM engagement activity in their classroom using everyday materials that encourages students to construct a robotic-like hand and demonstrate how data are collected when using robotic technology. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how humans and robots are working hand in hand to expand the horizons of space exploration and how robotic research that has helped make advances in medicine, auto manufacturing, among other things. Without robotics, major accomplishments like the building the International Space Station, repairing satellites in space, and exploring other worlds would not be possible.

Speakers

LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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How to create a simple bioinformatics activity that connects to your current science curricula.

McCormick Place - W193b

Advances in biotechnology, particularly DNA sequencing, has led to a surge in genetic data and large online databases. Interpreting these data, using the interdisciplinary field of bioinformatics, is in high demand because genome sequencing is becoming increasingly cheaper and faster. In science classrooms, there are many opportunities to incorporate bioinformatics, but this can be a daunting task for teachers who do not know where to begin. This hands-on activity starts by introducing participants to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) website. Presenters will provide a brief overview of the database to guide participants on: 1) how to use the search functions of the database, 2) interpret information on sequence pages, and 3) how to download DNA, RNA or amino acid sequences. Following the guided tour, small groups will be provided discussion questions to discover potential areas within their curricula that could be reinforced or enhanced with a brief bioinformatics activity. Participants will be provided worksheets to help document relevant sequence information (accession numbers) for the biological phenomenon or topic that inspired the activity. The participants will leave with a basic understanding of sequence capture from NCBI and a rudimentary activity to expose students to sequence data analysis.

Takeaways: An understanding of the genetic code and basic internet browsing skills are all that are needed to explore bioinformatics and use them in the classroom.

Speakers

Zack Bateson (National Agricultural Genotyping Center: Fargo, ND), Jane Hunt (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

How to Create a Simple Bioinformatics Activity - NSTA Chicago 22.pdf
Presentation Slides for the Workshop Session on Creating a Simple Bioinformatics Acitivity
Bringing bioinformatics into the science classroom.pdf
Electronic version of the worksheet used during the Workshop Session

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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STEMscopes Showcase: What’s New at STEMscopes?

McCormick Place - W470a

Sponsoring Company: STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning

If you're using STEMscopes (or wanna-be), this session is for you. Come see examples of the EXCITING and NEW ASPECTS to the most popular digital science curriculum during this showcase. Discover program enhancements, Google integration, streaming, coding, engineering, and much more.

Takeaways: Learn about STEMscopes' various components and programs by experienced users in a hands-on setting.

Speakers

Kenneth Heydrick (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Amanda McGee (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Ashley Mathis (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Bobby Barron (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Jacque Garcia (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Tammy Motley (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

STEMscopes-2022-July23-STEMscopes-Showcase-NSTA (1).pdf

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Speed Sharing: Elementary Science

McCormick Place - W187b

1) Multidimensional Assessment Tasks and a Virtual Learning Community for Elementary Science Teachers
Learn about two free online resources: NGSS-focused assessment tasks for Grades 3—5 and a website to help teachers use those assessments in their classes.

2) Invasive Species Science + CS: An Intentionally Inclusive Module
Learn about an integrated science and computer science module that uses inclusive instructional strategies to address the needs of all students.

Speakers

Liz Lehman (American Medical Association: Chicago, IL), Brian Gane (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Sania Zaidi (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations

McCormick Place - W184d

Participants will learn about the framework for computational thinking and then learn to apply it to science inquiry investigations using Block Coding (used with students in elementary and middle school in many jurisdictions) and how it can be used to improve the conduct of science investigations (and be more like the investigations conducted by scientists).   Participants will apply the computational thinking framework to creating/modifying/using simple programs (either using a free online programming tool OR with a simple, inexpensive microcontroller that will be loaned by the presenters) that can be used in science inquiry investigations either for conducting the investigation (e.g., a random number generator) or for collecting data (e.g., a counter and a timer). Investigations where these can be used will be discussed and demonstrated. The use of the microcontrollers and/or a free online programming tool to develop a simple measurement tool provides participants (and their students) an opportunity to experience a simulated situation a scientist or engineer would face as they use computing tools to develop automated measuring responses.   Finally, as an example of what is known as “physical computing”, participants will learn to build (and will build if time allows) a physical interface (to use with a computer or Chromebook) that allows them to interact with a program they have either written or downloaded.   Participants will be provided printed copies of example lesson plans and instruction sheets on how to engage students with using the Scratch program and the microcontrollers). Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment is necessary to participate in this workshop. 

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how computational thinking (applied to simple block coding examples and simple micro-controllers) can be used in science classrooms to help students conduct better inquiry investigations and better experience “authentic” science practices.

Speakers

G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS), Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations.pdf

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Alexa for Astronauts: Bring Space and Voice Artificial Intelligence to Life Science This Year!

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

This session will introduce participants to the Alexa for Astronauts: Using AI to Monitor Health lesson set. We will explore how the instructional sequence exposes high school students to ideas about artificial intelligence (AI) and computer programming, using Amazon Alexa and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) App Inventor, while applying previously built life science ideas to begin to address the problem of monitoring astronauts’ physical health. Participants will gain experience using the Alexa-MIT App Inventor to program custom Alexa skills and learn how to sign up for access to the instructional materials. No accounts needed; bring a laptop or device to access the Alexa-MIT App Inventor.

Takeaways: The Alexa-MIT App Inventor platform and teacher supports found in the lesson plans make it possible to incorporate computer science and artificial intelligence ideas in Biology class.

Speakers

Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Garrett Dorfman (Amazon Future Engineer: Nashville, TN), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/sCD3GL620v4_E

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Designing Escape Boxes

McCormick Place - W183b

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

Takeaways: Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

Speakers

Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.