2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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110 results

Lunch: Elements of Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Wednesday, July 20 • 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Regency Ballroom


STRAND: No Strand

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By Invitation Only

Shifting from traditional professional development to curriculum-based professional learning is a simple concept but complex to design and execute well. At its core, it means teachers experience the same kind of inquiry-based learning we expect them to provide their students. Learn more about a Carnegie Corporation of New York report, The Elements, which identifies a core set of research-based actions, approaches, and enabling conditions that effective schools and systems have put in place to reinforce and amplify the power of high-quality curriculum and skillful teaching.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Examine beliefs and assumptions regarding the relationship between high-quality instructional materials, curriculum-based professional learning and student success 2. Gain understanding of the foundation for The Elements, a challenge paper from Carnegie Corporation of New York 3. Learn from science practitioners whose successful curriculum implementation efforts are grounded in the elements and essentials.

SPEAKERS:
Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a Brand New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

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Since its release, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the NGSS has become an essential tool for many educators across the country. A new version titled the Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimension has been developed to not only support teachers in all states that have standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education. This new version of the Quick-Reference Guide still contains the most useful features of the original, including descriptions of the practices and the crosscutting concepts from the Framework of K-12 Science Education and K-12 progressions of the elements of all three dimensions. In addition, the new Quick-Reference Guide contains several new features that should make it even more helpful. For example, every element now has a unique code (based on the codes in the NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions) that makes it much easier to reference a particular element. In addition, there is an entire chapter devoted to the Performance Expectations. Finally, the guide also contains a number of tools for working with standards. This session will outline all of the features of the guide through the process of unpacking the crosscutting concepts to better understand how to make curriculum, instruction, and assessment more three-dimensional.

TAKEAWAYS:
A deeper understanding of the Crosscutting Concepts and how a well-designed reference guide can make it easier to unpack the three dimensions for work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) - An Effective Approach to Ensuring an Inclusive Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

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The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines are a tool that can be used to design learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners (CAST, 2018). Instructional designers and teachers can use these principles to create learning environments that reduce barriers to access for all students, while keeping in mind the learning goals of the lesson. The three guiding principles of UDL are engagement, representation, and action and expression. In this session educators will be provided with examples of these principles in action in sample materials from OpenSciEd and classroom videos. In these examples, participating will identify how the materials have been purposefully designed with multiple avenues for engagement, representation, and action and expression. Additionally, they will identify the built-in supports for teachers to highlight student assets and to address potential barriers to learning for their local student population. Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Supporting Civically Engaged Argument Writing in Science and Technology Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W178b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Guided Session Notes and Resources

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

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Participants will use a graphic organizer to record their thinking as I describe a unit I taught in which students in grades 9-12 explored issues related to artificial intelligence. Students crafted op-Eds advocating for what we should do in our community about emerging technologies like driverless cars and facial recognition. As I describe the unit, I will highlight how I (1) kicked off the unit with a phenomenon that raised questions about convenience, safety, security, equity, and justice; (2) layered on texts and encouraged students to grapple with multiple perspectives on AI-related issues; (3) used routines and mentor texts to support students in crafting claims and connecting evidence to their claims; and (4) engaged students in processes of revision. Then, participants will work in self-selected groups to explore science/technology/society text sets on topics like lab grown meat and space debris. As they explore the text set, they will engage with a classroom routine to develop a compelling, debatable, defensible, and nuanced claim. Participants will share what they discovered as they explored the text set and wrote claims in their group and will reflect on how these text sets and routines might become part of their classroom practice.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about freely available text sets and classroom routines developed by teachers for supporting civically engaged argument writing about science and technology issues in society.

SPEAKERS:
John Smith (Chester A Arthur School: Philadelphia, PA)

Strategies to Elevate Students Scientific Literacy with Real-World Data

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document of links and the slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

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Science literacy is essential to be informed and engaged citizens in the 21st century. Data are what we use to do science. Thus, reading and making sense of real-world data are fundamental skills to being scientifically literate and a fun way to engage learners with science. However, how do we incorporate data into K-8 science without feeling overburdened with yet another thing to teach? By integrating it into what we are already doing! Join us to explore the connections between data, science, and literacy. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. The goal is to increase our data toolkit of strategies and resources to increase science literacy and relevance for students. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better helps students do and communicate science. Working with and learning from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ literacy skills. Let’s set our students up for success now and in the future!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into K-8 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Rock Their Worlds: Teaching Earth and Space Science Using Browser-Based Lessons and Simulations

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W194b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
NSTA22-Rock Their Worlds_ Teaching Earth and Space Science Using Browser-Based Lessons and Simulations.pdf

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Sponsoring Company: Simulation Curriculum

Discover more new and interesting facts about plate tectonics, volcanism, Earth materials, geological processes, astronomy, and cosmology using NGSS-focused lesson plans and interactive and thought-provoking exercises and simulations.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will come away from the workshop with more knowledge and information about the subject matter, a new understanding of what is available for convenient teaching tools, and a general increase in the level of confidence while teaching the topics of Earth and space science.

SPEAKERS:
Dave Farina (Cosmos Safari LLC: No City, No State)

Genes in Space: Genetics Research on the International Space Station, Free Biotech Equipment, and More!

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W476


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Sponsoring Company: miniPCR bio

Genes in Space is an experimental design competition that invites students in middle and high school to design biology experiments addressing challenges faced by space travelers. Each year, one winning project is launched to the International Space Station, where it is carried out by astronauts. Join us to learn how the contest can engage your students in authentic research combining science and engineering practices. We will also share how you can access free Genes in Space classroom resources, including lesson plans, classroom activities, explainer videos, and biotechnology equipment loans.

TAKEAWAYS:
Engage students in an experimental design contest, access free classroom resources including lesson plans, activities, videos, and biotechnology equipment loans, and make a real-world scientific contribution for a chance to launch your experiment to the International Space Station

SPEAKERS:
Bruce Bryan (miniPCR: Cambridge, MA)

Everything You Always Wanted to Know about NGSS, But Were Afraid to Ask

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W175a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Everything you always wanted to know about NGSS_Handout.pdf
Everything you always wanted to know about NGSS_Presentation.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

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The NGSS is very complicated. The Institute for Quality Science Teaching at the Museum of Science and Industry provides professional learning opportunities for science teachers in Chicagoland and surrounding areas. Our approach is to ground everything we do in the NGSS and take a deep dive into all the elements of 3-dimensional learning. Professional learning programs at MSI are invested in helping teachers understand how to teach science effectively to meet these standards. Teachers in our programs learn science content in the context of 3-dimensional lessons, as instructors demonstrate instructional practices that enable NGSS-aligned teaching and learning. This presentation will review the basics of the NGSS, the 3 dimensions, how they’re combined in Performance Expectations, and the basics of enacting the NGSS in the classroom. If you need a refresher, just want a review, or still don’t have all those acronyms straight in your head, this is the presentation for you.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will leave with a basic understanding of the structures of the Next Generation Science Standards and how they inform 3-dimensional standards and 3-dimensional science teaching.

SPEAKERS:
Lauren Slanker (Museum of Science and Industry: Chicago, IL), Karin Klein (Museum of Science and Industry: Chicago, IL)

Connecting Three-Dimensional Learning to Upcoming Out-of-this-World Phenomena

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W176a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
PPT for 3D astronomy workshop for Chicago - 26Jun2022.pdf
Solar Science - Activities to teach about lunar phases and eclispes.pdf
Solar Science and WTSGD Handout 2022 - 8Jun2022.pdf
Two Beautiful Eclipses Coming to North America Info Sheet - 24Jun2022.pdf

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Get ready for the 2023 and 2024 solar eclipses. See how learning activities about Earth, Moon and Sun provide three-dimensional learning experiences that connect to these events, which will be more spectacular than the 2017 eclipse.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will have a better understanding of what is meant by three-dimensional learning, see how 3-D learning can lead to knowing what causes lunar phases and eclipses, and be prepared to enjoy the solar eclipses in 2023 and 2024.

SPEAKERS:
Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR)

Engineering Severe Weather Solutions

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Sever Weather Slide Deck

STRAND: No Strand

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Human activities have caused changes in global temperature and weather patterns. This generation of students will need to understand climate science in order to adapt to this changing environment. In this session, participants will explore a project in which students incorporate engineering and basic coding - no experience necessary. We will use micro:bit technology to connect basic coding commands to collect authentic data using embedded sensors. Participants will use this collected data to modify design solutions based on human vulnerabilities to severe weather. Participants will find ways to expose their students to the engineering capabilities needed to solve problems. This project allows students to compare design solutions to identify which is best for the problem at hand and experience the interactive process of evaluating solutions. This project allows for the authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Use technology to expose students to coding and engineering design solutions for severe weather.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Broaden Science Participation: Unpack “Analyze & Interpret” to Teach Data As an Equalizer

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document and a slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

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We live in a data-driven world, and our students will be working in a data-driven workforce. Therefore, it is critical that our Pre-K-12 students learn foundational data literacy skills. However, currently these skills are too often only taught in upper-level classes. All students need these skills and all students, down to our little Pre-Kers, can work with and make sense of science data. Let’s make sure data is an equalizer, rather than another divider in our educational system and society! Join us as we explore what perception and learning science tell us about how our brains process data. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources to build science knowledge and self-efficacy through data. Finally, we will explore ways to adapt our existing curriculum activities and data visualizations to help our students more equitably access science. Through hands-on activities and group discussions, participants will leave more empowered to leverage data and data visualizations into their science content in purposeful ways for all learners. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall 21st century skills. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century for all students and ways to adjust existing curriculum to leverage data as entry points into science inquiry, sensemaking, and knowledge for all learners to see themselves in STEM.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

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Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

Making A Career In Science Education In 2022

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

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Confused about what to do post COVID? Thinking about switching careers? Learn about the experiences, challenges, and mistakes made by several esteemed science education leaders in this engaging and interactive panel discussion. This panel will feature current and former teachers, school leaders, district leaders, consultants, academics, national STEM education leaders.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about the increasing number of opportunities available for educators both inside and outside of the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Lach (The University of Chicago: Highland Park, IL)

The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

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One of the key features of the NGSS and other standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education is the idea that a “a progression of knowledge occurs from grade band to grade band that gives students the opportunity to learn more complex material, leading to an overall understanding of science by the end of high school.” (NGSS Appendix A, p. 2) The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions has a set of 62 maps that illustrate the how the elements of the three dimensions build on each other and connect to one another. Each map focuses on a particular topic and shows the progression students are expected to make in that topic from one grade-span to the next. Arrows connecting individual elements on a map indicate that competency in one element is useful in learning to achieve the other element. Educators can use maps to deepen their understanding of the standards to plan or improve curriculum, instruction, and assessment. This session will provide participants guidance on how to read the maps in the Atlas and use this powerful tool to deepen their understanding of elements of the standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
A careful review of the connections between elements of the three dimensions can provide a clearer understanding of science standards and important guidance in planning instructional sequences to support three-dimensional teaching and learning.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Experience a Unique Perspective of What We Are Seeing When Comparing Aerial Earth Photos with Various Images of Celestial Objects of Our Universe

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W186b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Agenda NSTA National Conference Chicago, July 21, 2022.docx
Celestial Images and Earth Objects.pdf
Data Worksheet for Comparing and Contrasting Images.docx
Data Worksheet for Geology and Art.docx
letter for Educators July 21, 2022 workshop.docx
Possible Connections to the Next Generation Science Standards.docx

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

An open-ended  investigation using the basic elements of the visual arts to compare images of Earth and celestial objects of our universe. Examples of student comparisons and a packet of resources will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will: 1. use images from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and compare them to Earth images taken by Yann Arthus-Bertrand; 2. compare and contrast, using the basic elements in art and the properties of matter used in science, to describe each object; and 3. continue to create their own comparisons using the images made available in the workshop.

SPEAKERS:
Sally Jensen (Retired Educator: Campton, NH)

Astronomy: Teaching Nighttime Subjects during the Day

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W192b


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Sponsoring Company: Fisher Science Education

Space exploration is expanding and so are the needs for scientists who look to space for solutions to our current issues. So how do you spark the imagination of your kids? Let’s make astronauts cool again! This workshop focusses on creating that spark in middle school aged children by focusing on products that can relate space to students in a classroom during daylight hours. We will focus on three categories of products. 1) Portable, affordable telescopes designed for night time use that can be loaned out to students. 2) Apps and teaching aids that can be used during class to simulate a nighttime setting. 3) Products that specifically are designed to work during the day such as a sun scope or classroom models.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn about a series of products designed to teach space to students during the day.

SPEAKERS:
Thomas Wright ( : No City, No State)

Cloudy with a Chance of Modeling

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

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Our students use field work, computer modeling, and long term databases to understand the Earth's changing system. Students collect local weather data. They compare this data with regional and national databases, satellites databases, and climate modeling software (EdGCM).

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn how to introduce climate science in a non-threatening way by empowering their students to take a stand in their communities regarding decisions that affect their future by seamlessly incorporating field studies with professional climate studies.

SPEAKERS:
Carolyn Mohr (University Center of Lake County: Grayslake, IL)

Including Teachers in Developing Large-Scale Assessments for Science

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


STRAND: No Strand

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Learn about the novel approach taken by Illinois to include teacher voice in developing a statewide three-dimensional science assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about the process of developing a state-wide assessment written by local educators.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Harvey Henson (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL), Angela Box (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL)

Installation Science Exhibits as Assessment Options

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W187c


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

To help develop more scientifically curious and literate students, we use scientific literature or documentaries to engage students in developing the NGSS science practices. Students find an interesting topic, generate a question, collect and analyze data and then develop a Science Installation that communicates their learning to the greater community. Our most recent class project had students study how to grow food in a simulated Mars environment with the conditions controlled by student programmed raspberry pis. High school students organized 6th graders to do hands on data collection. They created a 10x12 foot exhibit that looked like a Martian landscape and highlighted the equipment they used with the plants still growing. The display included QR codes to communicate data and research using student-created videos, infographics, and data tables. Other installations include a monochromatic yellow room where everything looks grey and allowed observers to learn about the properties of light and the ways light energy is used in photosynthesis, the way it can be used to promote electrons, and the way it produces color. Other exhibits include sound waves and a history or music and musical instruments, the chemistry of color, and an environmental study of our use of carbon.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to guide students in the reading of scientific literature or the watching of documentaries in order to generate an authentic question and project. (How can we develop the capacity to farm on Mars? How does yellow monochromatic light produce the absence of color (an episode of Abstract, What can we learn about pollen structure from 3D printed files from Bayer’s agricultural division?) Participants will review a process to take the question and generate an authentic study that transcends a single class, grade, or discipline. (Students in 11th grade worked with students in 6th grade to test growing plants under controlled conditions that simulated Mars. Students in art and physics classes explored the properties of light and created a light-based art exhibit with science lessons on QR codes) Participants will explore a template for guiding students through the creation of an installation/exhibit that creatively shows the question, their experiment, their analysis, and potential solutions or conclusions in a creative and community-informing way. The exhibit is similar to an art installation with QR codes and experiment/study artifacts presented in a museum like scenario.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Helfant (Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School: Saint Louis, MO)

The STEM of PBL

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
_Main_Course.pdf
http://bit.ly/STEMPBLQA
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1c38TeuqPSC-vS8GLiVXQH9GzI7g0sjbx/view?usp=sharing
STEM PBL in action
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HyFVEpZyEY
STEM PBL in action
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
Guiding questions
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
The Engineering Design Process/Journal Reflections
Projects VS PBL.docx
What Is PBL_ARTICLE.pdf
Why Is PBL Important_ARTICLE.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

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Participants will understand how to develop and effectively implement STEM curriculum units that include project based activities and performance based assessments. Participants will learn to help students answer complex questions and develop solutions for challenges and real-world problems. They will also assist students with extending and refining their acquired knowledge to routinely analyze and solve problems. By the end of this session: 1) Participants will gain a clear and coherent understanding of what a STEM PBL is and how it works. 2) Participants will be able to identify and create effective essential questions. 3) Participants will be able to identify and apply the components of a STEM PBL. 4) Understand how STEM PBL’s will impact instruction for participants and students. Agenda: What is PBL? Why is it important? How does a STEM PBL Work? How to effectively integrate journal reflections. Ways to Implement STEM PBL’s

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to effectively implement STEM PBL’s (Project Based Learning) by integrating the components of STEM and PBL in order to grow students' capacity for creativity, fun, and back-loaded learning in a STEM context.

SPEAKERS:
Adero Carter (Clayton County Public Schools: Jonesboro, GA)

Let's Get Middle School Students Interested in Climate Change!

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

What causes seasons on Earth? How is permafrost affected by climate change? What can we learn from ice cores about climate? These questions are answered through a series of NGSS aligned, hands-on activities. Students design an experiment to test the effect of Earth’s tilt on seasons, explore the effect of climate change on structures built on permafrost, and more! The eesmarts climate change curriculum is composed of adapted lessons surrounding natural cycles that occur on Earth and in our solar system, including the carbon cycle and sunspot activity, how these cycles affect populations, and how humans may affect natural cycles. Activities examine evidence from the past through proxies such as tree rings, cherry tree blossoms, and ice core data. Additional topics include climate and ecosystems, the impact of invasive species, and how to minimize the effect of human activity. The lessons are part of the eesmarts K-12 curriculum, an energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy learning initiative funded by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund. They are written in the 5-E Instructional Model and include presentation Google Slides and handouts. Select digital resources will be provided to participants. The complete eesmarts program is free and available to all Connecticut educators.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore activities involving natural cycles including the sun cycle, the carbon cycle, and seasons, as well as a variety of proxies and what they can tell us about Earth’s climate past and present.

SPEAKERS:
Kathleen Brooks (eesmarts: , 0), Karin Jakubowski (eesmarts: No City, No State)

Dumpster Dive with STEM

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Dumpster Dive With STEM Participant Folder

STRAND: No Strand

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Connect the human impact of trash pollution to engineering design. Get your students thinking critically and creatively as they collaborate in real-world problem-solving. The global real-world issue of human-generated trash polluting local bodies of water is the main focus of this hands-on session. Using our partnership with the Howard County Conservancy, our students learn about their local watersheds and contribute to a Watershed Report Card. Students see how trash that is often found on our local schoolyards can affect our watershed, and they design a working model for trash removal in a local tributary. Basic coding will be used to design programs that will control sensors and motors through a microcontroller, thus removing the trash from the water source. The model will utilize solar and water power to move the trash into a separate receptacle. Various sensors will also be used to monitor water levels and determine the outcome of the program. This session will allow participants to find ways to increase the environmental stewardship of their students while incorporating engineering design into the science classroom. This project allows authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Design a project that enhances STEM skills in students such as collaboration, curiosity and creative problem solving.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Data, Tables, Graphs, Oh My! Strategies to Get All Students Doing & Speaking Science

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Access to Resource Document
Complete the Google Form to gain access to the Resource Document and slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

We are naturally curious, prone to ask why? How? What? Unfortunately, somewhere along the way students lose the trust in their voices to ask questions of and from data. But data are what we use to do science and it permeates all aspects of society today. What should we do? Stop teaching the vocabulary of science and data first, and instead leverage classroom-ready strategies to empower students to lead with their innate curiosity to practice critical 21st century data literacy skills and master the science content. Join us to explore connections between our science content, inquiry-based activities, and data skills. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy and student empowerment. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better help students do and communicate science. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall self-identity as a scientist. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century, how students can do a lot more with data than we often think or presume from their science vocabulary alone, and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into 6-12 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Solid Composite Propellant Model Rocket Science Education

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W194b


Show Details

Sponsoring Company: AeroTech/Quest, Div. of RCS Rocket Motor Component

Explore the differences between aerospace-grade solid composite propellant model rocket motors and traditional black powder model rocket motors in science education, STEM programs, TARC Competition, and collegiate rocket team activities. We'll assemble a Quest Astra III model rocket kit during the workshop to take back to your classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
In model rocket science education, AeroTech/Quest products have been "STEM from the beginning!”™

SPEAKERS:
Dane Boles (AeroTech / Quest Divison of RCS Rocket Motor Components, Inc.: , United States)

Teaching with Co-Lob-Orate

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W192b


Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Fisher Science Education & Aldon

Looking for ways to connect your classroom, regardless of whether students are in school or at home? Co-lab-orate is an innovative digital lab notebook that allows educators to easily create, assign, and grade lab reports, while helping students communicate with their classmates and teachers. Co-lab-orate can be used to complete hands-on activities done individually or in a group setting, when working at school or remotely. Join Fisher Science Education and Aldon as we conduct an experiment while showcasing Co-lab-Orate’s game changing and cost-effective teaching platform!

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will perform a lab experiment and record the results on their own device experiencing the full power of Co-Lab-Orate.

SPEAKERS:
Kymberly Hall , Alex Molinich (Aldon Corporation: Avon, NY)

Data and Storylines: The key to helping all students become STEM literate

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Data and Storylines
Resources for Teachers
Resource Folder
Resource Folder

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

News bulletins on social media and news sites contain topics that students need to understand now so that they can make informed decisions for their world today and tomorrow. STEM literacy is crucial to learners struggling to understand the multitude of information bombarding them through television, social media and the internet. Students in K-12 must become STEM literate so that they can identify, understand and solve problems in the world around them. STEM Literacy promotes innovative thinking and creativity as well as collaboration, problem solving, and most importantly, critical thinking. Today’s challenges need answers from our students but first they need to understand issues including climate change, space travel, robotics. By using real-world applications of scientific data and storylines, students become critical consumers, problem-solvers, and change-makers. Students who are STEM literate will be able to think critically and act responsibly about issues that impact them. In this session, lessons and strategies will be shared with teachers to inspire and to support their students as they develop STEM literacy skills. These lessons will encourage students to explore, explain and develop solutions to real phenomena and solve real problems.

TAKEAWAYS:
Three Takeaways: 1) Teachers will become familiar with technology, literacy and adaptive learning for middle school and high school students. 2) Teachers will be introduced to the free materials available that align with NGSS standards. 3) Teachers will be given ideas on how to incorporate these lessons in class

SPEAKERS:
Diane Ripollone (Cardinal Gibbons High School: Raleigh, NC), Kathy Biernat (Educational Consultant: Franklin, WI)

Digital Choose-Your-Own Science Adventure

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W185a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Participants experience three different digital design challenges using branching scenarios that provide student choice and data sets involving wind energy, electromagnetism, and the greenhouse effect.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will engage in three digital design challenges to test the efficiency of wind turbine blades, the strength of electromagnets, and the greenhouse effect on different land surfaces (polar region, water, and desert).

SPEAKERS:
Rebecca Tonkinson (eesmarts: Hartford, CT), Sharyon Holness (eesmarts: No City, No State), Kathleen Brooks (eesmarts: , 0)

Preparing for the 2023 Annular and 2024 Total Solar Eclipses

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Learn about the many resources available to help plan your viewing of the 2023 annular and 2024 total solar eclipses.

TAKEAWAYS:
In order to see the maximum coverage of the Sun in a solar eclipse, the most important detail is a clear sky and fewer clouds. According to current climate data, the best locations to observe each solar eclipse will be reviewed.

SPEAKERS:
Richard Thomas (Beacon High School: Naples, FL)

Teaching Critical-Thinking Skills to Reluctant Teenagers

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W181b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Teaching Critical Thinking skills to reluctant teenagers.pptx

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Learn how to overcome the apathy of teenagers, understand their motivations for not asking questions, and get them to be curious again!

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will take away multiple strategies to implement in their classroom to spark the curiosity of teens they teach.

SPEAKERS:
Jamye Carr (Cedar Ridge High School: Hillsborough, NC)

What Is a Phenomenon Anyway?

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W194b


Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Phenomenon Science Education

In this session, we will explore what phenomena are by looking at examples and non-examples and using criteria to figure out the differences.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will be given criteria and guidelines that they will use to evaluate science phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Sharon Cates (Phenomenon Science Education: Amherst, MA), Joshua Smith (Phenomenon Science Education: Novato, CA)

Meet Me in the Middle, Lite: A Share-a-Thon

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
UIC Teacher Fellows Info
Informational Flyer on Teacher Fellows program to develop classroom learning companion robots

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Engage in a variety of activities, collect information and resources, and network with middle level leaders. Discover new ideas and materials that you can use next week.

TAKEAWAYS:
The participants will network with other middle level science educators and leaders to discover and engage in activities that will expand their knowledge and be usable in all aspects of their work.

SPEAKERS:
Mary Lou Lipscomb (National Middle Level Science Teachers Association: Naperville, IL), Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Carey Dieleman (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ), Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA), Suzanne Cunningham (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN), Katy Garvey (The Source for Learning, Inc.: Reston, VA), Nicole Green (Animalearn: Jenkintown, PA), Joseph Michaelis (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Kim Nagle (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Anne Farley Schoeffler (Seton Catholic School: Hudson, OH), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Corydon Strawser (Lake Nona Middle School: Orlando, FL), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA), Barbara Phillips-Bredlow (Northeast Nodaway School District: Ravenwood, MO), Dawn Konieczny (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Erin Towns (Edward Little High School: Auburn, ME)

Scaffolding Students’ Progression Through CCCs and SEPs Using Resources from the OpenSciEd Toolkit

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W186c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
https://www.openscied.org/teacher-resources/
NSTA 2022 Chicago - SEP and CCC Toolkit Slides.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

See how tools developed within OpenSciEd units can support students’ progression of and engagement in SEPs and CCCs across a variety of unit contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with practical tools such as graphic organizers, general rubrics, and self- and peer-assessments that can be used to support students in incrementally building SEPs and CCCs in a variety of units.

SPEAKERS:
Dawn Novak (Science Educator: Grayslake, IL), Gail Housman (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Jamie Deutch Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Providing actionable feedback to build students’ self-reflection skills

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W181a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Actionable Feedback.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

How many teacher comments on student work are left unread? Or, even if they are read, how useful are they to the student? Can the student positively internalize the feedback and use it to improve their work? Chances are the answer is no! But it doesn’t have to be this way! During this session, participants will learn more effective strategies for giving actionable feedback and methods to help their students utilize feedback to improve their work. First we’ll learn how to ask questions in student feedback and how differently questions are internalized by the student. For example, consider the difference between, “I don’t understand what you mean here,” and “Can you explain in more detail what you meant in this statement?” Then we’ll discover how to make sure teachers' feedback is read and used by students to improve their work. By making self reflection a formalized step in the learning process, teachers provide students opportunities to practice this important skill! Participants will receive a worksheet with feedback tips and tricks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Several methods that can be applied immediately in the classroom, providing feedback encouraging students to be self reflective of their own work.

SPEAKERS:
Regina Borriello (Clifton High School: Edison, NJ)

Making Group Work Fair: The Potential Pitfalls of Student Peer Evaluations

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Although group projects have been shown to increase learning and cooperation, bullying can sneak into student peer evaluations. Examples and alternatives to ghosting presented.

TAKEAWAYS:
Science classrooms are a great place for group projects to enhance learning, but students may unwittingly be ghosted from their group, ultimately making them seem like they are not a team player. We as teachers must be diligent against bullying/ghosting.

SPEAKERS:
Diane Huelskamp (Wright State University-Lake Campus: Celina, OH)

Build a K–12 STEAM Pipeline Through Family STEAM Night

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W180


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Engage students, families, and the community in STEAM through Family STEAM Nights in order to equitably build understanding and interest in STEAM.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to create, recruit, and implement a Family STEAM Night to engage students, families, and the community in STEAM.

SPEAKERS:
McKenna Serowka (Lake Zurich High School: Lake Zurich, IL)

Digging Deeper into the Data with an Adapted CER Framework

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

This session focuses on improved outcomes for students’ written science explanations when including data description prompts and instructional facilitation to adapt the CER framework.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn about the importance of a preliminary step of incorporating data descriptions when utilizing the CER framework to guide students’ written explanations and reasoning of data visualization.

SPEAKERS:
Andrea Drewes (Rider University: Lawrenceville, NJ)

“What is in our air?” Introducing Air Pollution for grades 5-8

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W184a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

While receiving less media exposure than climate change or plastic waste, air pollution is a substantial environmental challenge of the 21st century. The World Health Organization estimates that about seven million premature deaths globally can be attributed to outdoor and household air pollution. Many education organizations and guidelines, including the NSTA and NGSS, emphasize understanding, monitoring, and mitigating human impacts on the environment as a key competency for middle school students. While science education research is still working to identify the association between environmental knowledge, attitudes, and environmentally responsible behaviors, scholarly literature suggests that increasing knowledge of environmental issues is a critical first step towards fostering environmental concern and changes to actions. In this session, educators will learn how to implement a sequence of lessons and activities to explore air pollution sources, how polluted air impacts human health, and strategies to tackle this pressing challenge. The session will cover implementing a scientific inquiry lesson around investigating local sources of air pollution, identifying global trends using online databases, and applying concepts to a Mystery Town activity. These lessons are aligned with NGSS standards for Middle School Earth science and support a broad vision to prepare environmentally and scientifically literate citizens.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators who attend this presentation will explore a lesson and activity sequence, congruent with 5e and the NGSS, that introduces students to the science ideas encompassing air quality such as factors and sources of pollution, and associations with adverse human health effects.

SPEAKERS:
Benjamin Janney (Texas A&M University: College Station, TX)

Overview of Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate Initiative, and Kikim Media

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W184b-c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate In

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

This session will introduce participants to Our Beautiful Planet,  a collection of classroom-ready films and lesson plans that highlight the science and engineering practices scientists use to explain the phenomenon of climate change. The collection of over 10 lessons brings Sensemaking to environmental science by cultivating student curiosity with engaging and eye-popping phenomena.

TAKEAWAYS:
Our Beautiful Planet is a series of compelling 5-7 minute science films and lessons highlighting the cutting-edge research that climate scientists are doing to solve some of the world’s most pressing issues.

SPEAKERS:
Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Integrating Computer Science into Science Courses Without Losing Your Mind

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W175a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Orban_nsta22.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Computer science CAN be integrated into high school science classes. Here are some ideas from the STEMcoding Project!

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will work on three "STEMcoding" activities on: 1. climate change with connection to spreadsheets; 2. orbital motion for Earth science; and 3. the first of the "physics of video games" activities.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Orban (The Ohio State University at Marion: Marion, OH)

Science in Action: Updating the Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project Educators’ Guide

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W181a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Guide to NOAAs MDMAP for Educators (DRAFT ONLY)
Presentation Slides

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Marine debris is a widespread pollution problem in our ocean and waterways. It can harm wildlife, habitats, and our economy. This issue is human-caused, but it also has human solutions. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Debris Program is dedicated to better understanding and preventing marine debris and its impacts on our environment. One of the best tools we have to combat marine debris is understanding the distribution, abundance, and types of debris in the marine environment. The Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project (MDMAP) is a NOAA citizen science initiative to survey and record marine debris on shorelines. By participating in the MDMAP, students can generate critical data on marine debris for use by community organizations, policymakers, researchers, and NOAA. MDMAP data can also support student-generated action projects, providing opportunities to plan and implement authentic changemaking efforts. The NOAA Marine Debris Program plans to demonstrate and solicit feedback on an updated tool to support implementation of the MDMAP protocols with students: The MDMAP Educators’ Guide (Guide). We will introduce the updated protocols, provide a demonstration of activities in the Guide, and engage in a discussion with educators about implementation, suggested extensions (including action projects), and feedback.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees at this session will learn about the updated Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project Educators’ Guide: a refreshed citizen science tool for monitoring shoreline marine debris available from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, including planning and conducting protocols with students, working with survey data, and creating authentic, meaningful action projects for students based on their experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Alexandria Brake (NOAA Office of Education: Silver Spring, MD), Tanya Kea-Marie Torres (California Sea