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2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 125 results

Wednesday, July 20
11:45 AM - 12:45 PM
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Lunch: Elements of Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Regency Ballroom

By Invitation Only

Shifting from traditional professional development to curriculum-based professional learning is a simple concept but complex to design and execute well. At its core, it means teachers experience the same kind of inquiry-based learning we expect them to provide their students. Learn more about a Carnegie Corporation of New York report, The Elements, which identifies a core set of research-based actions, approaches, and enabling conditions that effective schools and systems have put in place to reinforce and amplify the power of high-quality curriculum and skillful teaching.

Takeaways: 1. Examine beliefs and assumptions regarding the relationship between high-quality instructional materials, curriculum-based professional learning and student success 2. Gain understanding of the foundation for The Elements, a challenge paper from Carnegie Corporation of New York 3. Learn from science practitioners whose successful curriculum implementation efforts are grounded in the elements and essentials.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a Brand New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

Since its release, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the NGSS has become an essential tool for many educators across the country. A new version titled the Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimension has been developed to not only support teachers in all states that have standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education. This new version of the Quick-Reference Guide still contains the most useful features of the original, including descriptions of the practices and the crosscutting concepts from the Framework of K-12 Science Education and K-12 progressions of the elements of all three dimensions. In addition, the new Quick-Reference Guide contains several new features that should make it even more helpful. For example, every element now has a unique code (based on the codes in the NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions) that makes it much easier to reference a particular element. In addition, there is an entire chapter devoted to the Performance Expectations. Finally, the guide also contains a number of tools for working with standards. This session will outline all of the features of the guide through the process of unpacking the crosscutting concepts to better understand how to make curriculum, instruction, and assessment more three-dimensional.

Takeaways: A deeper understanding of the Crosscutting Concepts and how a well-designed reference guide can make it easier to unpack the three dimensions for work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

Speakers

Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Universal Design for Learning (UDL) - An Effective Approach to Ensuring an Inclusive Science Classroom

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines are a tool that can be used to design learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners (CAST, 2018). Instructional designers and teachers can use these principles to create learning environments that reduce barriers to access for all students, while keeping in mind the learning goals of the lesson. The three guiding principles of UDL are engagement, representation, and action and expression. In this session educators will be provided with examples of these principles in action in sample materials from OpenSciEd and classroom videos. In these examples, participating will identify how the materials have been purposefully designed with multiple avenues for engagement, representation, and action and expression. Additionally, they will identify the built-in supports for teachers to highlight student assets and to address potential barriers to learning for their local student population. Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

Takeaways: Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

Speakers

Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Using tools to sense and interact with the environment

McCormick Place - W193a

After learning about computational thinking, participants will apply the framework to determine where students engage in computational thinking within the activity. Participants will engage in activities where students engineer as part of the investigations. Participants will be able to use a pre-programmed microcontroller (loaned by the presenters) to experience 3 different short investigations each tied to a different phenomenon. 1) Does angle matter? How does the angle of the collector affect how warm it is? Using the microcontroller and lamps participants will collect data to build a model that explains why the tilt of the Earth creates different seasons. 2) Transparent, Translucent, and Opaque. When working in a greenhouse, different materials can be used to cover the greenhouse. Which is the best material for your area? Using the light level sensor on the microcontroller, participants test different materials to recommend their uses when designing a greenhouse. 3) Making an alarm - using the microcontroller accelerometer sensor, participants arm an alarm and see how the accelerometer works in three dimensions. Participants will be provided printed copies of the lesson plans and how to engage students with using the microcontrollers. Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment brought is necessary to participate in this workshop.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn (1) Microcontrollers are small computers that come with several integrated sensors. Their functionality makes them useful for both investigations and engineering projects. Some of the basic functionality of different microcontrollers (2) One definition of computation thinking is how to use computers to solve problems. Computational thinking activities that connect students to everyday phenomena. The development of algorithms or the decomposition of problems into simple steps are just two examples of processes associated with computation thinking. It is a powerful problem-solving technique that is used in the modern world (3) How engineering tasks provide opportunities for student sensemaking

Speakers

Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Using tools to sense and interact with the environment.pdf

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Dog Mode Design Challenge

McCormick Place - W185a

Introducing students to real-world engineering problems is a key component to engaging them in the science classroom. In this project, students solve the problem of saving pets from a hot car. Many students are aware of this issue and would have many ideas on how this could be achieved. This projects gives them the tools to help solve such a problem by building a model and finding a solution. Participants in this session will get to build the model themselves to see how information from sensors (input) can determine what should be done (output) through simple lines of code. No coding or engineering experience is needed, just imagination and logical thinking. Projects like these can expose students to STEM Careers. The exposure to coding and engineering design can also get them interested in doing more in the STEM field.

Takeaways: Solve a real-work problem with coding and engineering design - no prior experience needed.

Speakers

Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Dog Mode Slide Deck

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Supporting Civically Engaged Argument Writing in Science and Technology Classrooms

McCormick Place - W178b

Participants will use a graphic organizer to record their thinking as I describe a unit I taught in which students in grades 9-12 explored issues related to artificial intelligence. Students crafted op-Eds advocating for what we should do in our community about emerging technologies like driverless cars and facial recognition. As I describe the unit, I will highlight how I (1) kicked off the unit with a phenomenon that raised questions about convenience, safety, security, equity, and justice; (2) layered on texts and encouraged students to grapple with multiple perspectives on AI-related issues; (3) used routines and mentor texts to support students in crafting claims and connecting evidence to their claims; and (4) engaged students in processes of revision. Then, participants will work in self-selected groups to explore science/technology/society text sets on topics like lab grown meat and space debris. As they explore the text set, they will engage with a classroom routine to develop a compelling, debatable, defensible, and nuanced claim. Participants will share what they discovered as they explored the text set and wrote claims in their group and will reflect on how these text sets and routines might become part of their classroom practice.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about freely available text sets and classroom routines developed by teachers for supporting civically engaged argument writing about science and technology issues in society.

Speakers

John Smith (Chester A Arthur School: Philadelphia, PA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Guided Session Notes and Resources

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Linking Literature and STEM in the PreK-8 Classroom

McCormick Place - W473

Sponsoring Company: SAE International

Attendees will explore different methods and student & teacher resources for enhancing real-world STEM skills with meaning-making literature. Using AWIM's award-winning STEM curriculum and complementary comic & children's books as examples, teachers will engage in discussions and hands-on activities they can facilitate in their classrooms. This workshop will also address how diverse representation in storytelling can foster more accessible & impactful STEM learning for all students. Participants will receive a free AWIM book.

Takeaways: Learn methods and resources for incorporating age-appropriate literature into hands-on STEM activities.

Speakers

Bonnie Thibodeau (SAE International: Warrendale, PA)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Let's DIVE-in to Engineering and the Engineering Design Process

McCormick Place - W470a

Sponsoring Company: STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning

Students get engaged with practical and inquiry-based engineering experiences by using the DIVE-in method. This program was developed in partnership with the New York Hall of Science. Transform your classroom into an authentic makerspace with the DIVE process. Learn how to facilitate and use the design process through consensus.

Takeaways: Learn how to create a stomp-rocket using the engineering design process.

Speakers

Leslie Spaeny (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

STEMscopes-2022-July21-Dive-In-Engineering-NSTA.pdf

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Engineering the Perfect Rube

McCormick Place - W192b

Sponsoring Company: Fisher Science Education and Eisco Scientific

Participants will have the opportunity to build a Rube Goldberg machine and engineer an overly complicated process to accomplish a simple task. Put your engineering and creative skills to the test as you create your own Rube Goldberg machine out of cardboard, tape, rubber bands, a toy car and other everyday items. Attendees will be broken into teams of five and given a set of raw materials. They will then have approximately forty minutes to work as a group to create a complex series of steps to pop a balloon. Attendance will be limited to the first twenty-five people to register. This is a joint workshop presented by Fisher Science Education and Eisco Scientific. This workshop has a maximum capacity of 25 participants.

Takeaways: Teachers will learn how to create a Rube Goldberg lab using excess materials and common laboratory items.

Speakers

Tom Wright (Thermo Fisher Scientific: Waltham, MA), Tim Montondo (Eisco Scientific LLC: Victor, NY)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Everything You Always Wanted to Know about NGSS, But Were Afraid to Ask

McCormick Place - W175a

The NGSS is very complicated. The Institute for Quality Science Teaching at the Museum of Science and Industry provides professional learning opportunities for science teachers in Chicagoland and surrounding areas. Our approach is to ground everything we do in the NGSS and take a deep dive into all the elements of 3-dimensional learning. Professional learning programs at MSI are invested in helping teachers understand how to teach science effectively to meet these standards. Teachers in our programs learn science content in the context of 3-dimensional lessons, as instructors demonstrate instructional practices that enable NGSS-aligned teaching and learning. This presentation will review the basics of the NGSS, the 3 dimensions, how they’re combined in Performance Expectations, and the basics of enacting the NGSS in the classroom. If you need a refresher, just want a review, or still don’t have all those acronyms straight in your head, this is the presentation for you.

Takeaways: Teachers will leave with a basic understanding of the structures of the Next Generation Science Standards and how they inform 3-dimensional standards and 3-dimensional science teaching.

Speakers

Lauren Slanker (Museum of Science and Industry: Chicago, IL), Karin Klein (Museum of Science and Industry: Chicago, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Everything you always wanted to know about NGSS_Handout.pdf
Everything you always wanted to know about NGSS_Presentation.pdf

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Engineering for Us All: Exploring the "Why," "What," and "Who" of Engineering

McCormick Place - W194a

“You’re good at math; be an engineer.” Isn’t there more to it? Who is an engineer? Engineering helps society by solving problems. Let’s explore “why.”

Takeaways: Learn that engineering is more than math + science and take away classroom activities addressing engineering identity, ethics, and society (not your typical engineering activities).

Speakers

Ken Reid (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Baseball card lesson
Baseball card lesson (complete)
Playpump lesson
Product archaeology lesson
Robot arm lesson (with materials list)
Shoe sole sketch and design lesson
Slides from presentation
More information on e4usa

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Engineering Severe Weather Solutions

McCormick Place - W176c

Human activities have caused changes in global temperature and weather patterns. This generation of students will need to understand climate science in order to adapt to this changing environment. In this session, participants will explore a project in which students incorporate engineering and basic coding - no experience necessary. We will use micro:bit technology to connect basic coding commands to collect authentic data using embedded sensors. Participants will use this collected data to modify design solutions based on human vulnerabilities to severe weather. Participants will find ways to expose their students to the engineering capabilities needed to solve problems. This project allows students to compare design solutions to identify which is best for the problem at hand and experience the interactive process of evaluating solutions. This project allows for the authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

Takeaways: Use technology to expose students to coding and engineering design solutions for severe weather.

Speakers

Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Sever Weather Slide Deck

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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STEM for All! Benefits of STEM Integration for Struggling to Gifted Learners, and Everyone in Between

McCormick Place - W187b

To effectively engage audience members, I will balance their readiness to learn, cognitive load, and stimulating activities. Using real-world examples, I will demonstrate the power of STEM in elementary classrooms to grow all learners and provide necessary 21st-century skills. Often STEM is an enrichment offered to high-achiever but struggling learners have even more to gain from STEM including confidence and leadership. I will focus on practical application, but valuable references and data will be included to support my practices. I will begin the session with a survey to identify the needs and perceptions of participants regarding STEM integration. Based on input, I will share research-based strategies, classroom integration examples, or dispel misconceptions. I will include an interactive STEM activity using index cards and paper clips to provide a STEM lesson model and demonstrate the ease of integrating STEM with simple, classroom supplies. Participants will leave the session with a better understanding of the benefits of STEM in K-5 classrooms and feel more comfortable integrating STEM into their own classrooms.

Takeaways: Participants will understand the value of STEM integration beyond the four letters of the acronym, including the benefits of productive struggle of high achievers and how the grit of struggling learners are paramount in the success of STEM challenges.

Speakers

Erika Neuman (Bulverde Creek Elementary School: San Antonio, TX)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA_STEMforALL.pdf

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Science + Engineering + Math = Parachute STEM Activity

McCormick Place - W181a

The basic physical science principles of gravitational force and air resistance are explored as students design, build, test, and evaluate parachutes. K-W-L charts are used to assess students’ knowledge of the engineering design process and the scientific method. The book, “Mercedes and the Chocolate Pilot” by Margot Theis Ravin, is read to students and they discuss whether the pilot acted like an engineer as he wanted to share sweets with children during the Berlin Airlift. The students are presented with a problem, getting food and water to islanders whose homes and roads have been damaged by hurricanes. Simple materials such as paper napkins, paper towels, crocheting thread, and paper clips are used to build the parachutes. The students use the five ‘E’s’: engagement, exploration, explanation, evaluation, and elaboration as they compare their various parachute models. Students learn that air contains particles, and it is these particles that place forces on bodies moving in the air and counteract the force of gravity. Students use math in the analysis of their models. Students learn that models representing parachutes can be designed in many ways and may behave differently when tested. Students learn the many ways engineering and science are used to explore and explain nature and are employed in manufacturing and technology processes.

Takeaways: Student groups learn that the engineering design process and the scientific method are circular processes as they design, build, test, and evaluate a parachute model then improve it.

Speakers

Suzanne Cunningham (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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How to Design a STEM Engineering Challenge

McCormick Place - W474b

Sponsoring Company: PASCO scientific

Give your students a real-world engineering challenge! In this PASCO workshop, you will explore the relationship between momentum and impact forces with real-time measurement of collisions. You will design your own crash barrier to minimize the maximum collision force of a moving cart colliding into your barrier. Next, you will analyze your results to iterate and improve on your original design.  Attend for a chance to win equipment for your school!

Takeaways: Learn how to design a crash cushion to minimize the collision force of a moving cart and analyze the results to iterate and improve on your design.

Speakers

Jonathan Hanna (PASCO Scientific: Roseville, CA)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Matter and Energy Learning Progressions in OpenSciEd High School Chemistry

McCormick Place - W196c

The forthcoming OpenSciEd High School chemistry course combines physical science and Earth and space science NGSS performance expectations as a way to engage students in developing understandings around energy and matter. Learn about the focus of the five units that make up this course and their associated performance expectation bundles to see how the three dimensions are used as a way to authentically engage students in making sense of both physical science and earth and space science related phenomena and design solutions. In the session, we will highlight how anchoring phenomena of the first unit, typically associated with earth and space science, helps students make sense of the particulate nature of matter, energy transfers in earth systems, feedback loops, and human interactions with their environment. An in-depth examination of the performance expectation bundles for the following four units will help illustrate the learning progressions students will follow to develop progressively more complex models of the particle nature of matter, its properties, and its interactions using the lenses of all crosscutting concepts, in particular, patterns, energy and matter, structure and function, and stability and change.

Takeaways: Incorporation of earth and space science NGSS performance expectations within a chemistry curriculum supports student engagement in and sensemaking of chemistry concepts around properties and interactions of matter and energy.

Speakers

Nicole Vick (Northwestern University: No City, No State), Dan Voss (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Tara McGill (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Chicago 2022 Chemistry Progressions.pdf

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

McCormick Place - W185d

Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

Takeaways: Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

Speakers

Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Making A Career In Science Education In 2022

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Confused about what to do post COVID? Thinking about switching careers? Learn about the experiences, challenges, and mistakes made by several esteemed science education leaders in this engaging and interactive panel discussion. This panel will feature current and former teachers, school leaders, district leaders, consultants, academics, national STEM education leaders.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about the increasing number of opportunities available for educators both inside and outside of the classroom.

Speakers

Michael Lach (The University of Chicago: Highland Park, IL)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

One of the key features of the NGSS and other standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education is the idea that a “a progression of knowledge occurs from grade band to grade band that gives students the opportunity to learn more complex material, leading to an overall understanding of science by the end of high school.” (NGSS Appendix A, p. 2) The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions has a set of 62 maps that illustrate the how the elements of the three dimensions build on each other and connect to one another. Each map focuses on a particular topic and shows the progression students are expected to make in that topic from one grade-span to the next. Arrows connecting individual elements on a map indicate that competency in one element is useful in learning to achieve the other element. Educators can use maps to deepen their understanding of the standards to plan or improve curriculum, instruction, and assessment. This session will provide participants guidance on how to read the maps in the Atlas and use this powerful tool to deepen their understanding of elements of the standards.

Takeaways: A careful review of the connections between elements of the three dimensions can provide a clearer understanding of science standards and important guidance in planning instructional sequences to support three-dimensional teaching and learning.

Speakers

Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Maximize the Benefits and Minimize the Challenges Associated with Embedding Engineering into the Science Curriculum using Argument-Driven Engineering

McCormick Place - W178b

This session is an introduction to a new approach to STEM instruction called Argument-Driven Engineering (ADE). ADE is an instructional approach that gives students an opportunity to learn to use core concepts and processes form science, engineering, and mathematics to figure out solutions to a meaningful and authentic problem that will help make the world a better place. This instructional approach also gives students an opportunity to develop disciplinary literacy skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) because they must obtain information, share and critique potential solutions through talk, and communicate what they figured out and how they know the solution is acceptable through writing. In this session, participants will examine the potential benefits and challenges associated with embedding engineering design into science classrooms and learn how the ADE instructional model can help maximize the benefits and reduce the challenges. Participants will also have a chance to experience an example of an ADE design challenge that invites them to design a shipping and storage container for insulin and see examples of how students who completed this design challenge used science, engineering, and mathematics content and processes to figure out how to keep the insulin cold for long periods of time. Participants will also learn about how this new approach was developed through three years of classroom-based research by a team of researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and how well ADE instructional materials are aligned with the TEKS for science, mathematics, CTE, and ELA.

Takeaways: • How to give students an opportunity to learn how to use concepts and processes from science, engineering, and mathematics to design a solution to an authentic problem that will help make the world a better place.

Speakers

Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Crash Science: When Physics Meets Biology

McCormick Place - W185b-c

Use innovative video-assisted STEM activities, demonstrations, award-winning videos, and behind-the-crash-tests tours to teach the science of car crashes. Visit classroom.iihs.org for more information.

Takeaways: Participants learn how to incorporate culminating STEM design challenges (Project Pedestrian Sensors and Egg-Carrying Paper Car Crash) into their curriculum to promote student awareness and understanding of how engineering and technology are used to build safer vehicles.

Speakers

Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Engineer Physical Science Excitement with a Carolina STEM Challenge®

McCormick Place - W471a

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Apply creative problem-solving skills and engineering practices to chemistry and physical science challenges with race cars and rockets. Experience how Carolina makes it easy to incorporate STEM into your classroom.

Takeaways: Teachers will take away hands-on experience in designing, making, and testing balloon race cars and reaction rockets.

Speakers

Patti Kopkau (Retired Educator: National City, MI)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Advancing Science Instruction with the Engineering Design Process

McCormick Place - W475a

Sponsoring Company: Great Minds

Dive into a PhD Science® module to explore the six steps of the Engineering Design Process and test a solution to a real-world problem.

Takeaways: PhD Science provides students with the opportunity for hands-on experiences that require the practical application of scientific processes.

Speakers

Ranell Blue (Great Minds: Washington, DC), Isaac Stauffer (Great Minds: Washington, DC)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Including Teachers in Developing Large-Scale Assessments for Science

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Learn about the novel approach taken by Illinois to include teacher voice in developing a statewide three-dimensional science assessment.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about the process of developing a state-wide assessment written by local educators.

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Harvey Henson (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL), Angela Box (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Chickenology: Food Delivery Challenge

McCormick Place - W179b

Participants will use sensemaking and the engineering design process to solve a real world food production problem in a small scale format. This lesson introduces the Food Delivery Challenge, in which participants must design a gravity feeder to carry food (chicken feed) to twelve hungry chickens for over 24 hours. To accomplish the task students must design and build a model of an efficient gravity feeder using the materials available to them. The scenario presented to the class: One of the feeders in your uncle’s barn has broken down, and a new one will not arrive until next month. You must create a gravity feeder to satisfy 12 chickens for 24 hours consistently to ensure the health of your flock. Participants will research, design, build and test their design before presenting to the group for feedback, Participants will then use the feedback to redesign for an improved feeder.

Takeaways: 1. Use the engineering design process to collaborate, design and build a gravitational feeder system that will feed 10 pounds of feed over a 24 hour period. 2. Present your design plan, and final product to the class for feedback. 3. Provide feedback to the design team for design improvement.

Speakers

Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH), Heather Bryan (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Lesson
Chickenology Student Rubric
Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Slide Deck

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Installation Science Exhibits as Assessment Options

McCormick Place - W187c

To help develop more scientifically curious and literate students, we use scientific literature or documentaries to engage students in developing the NGSS science practices. Students find an interesting topic, generate a question, collect and analyze data and then develop a Science Installation that communicates their learning to the greater community. Our most recent class project had students study how to grow food in a simulated Mars environment with the conditions controlled by student programmed raspberry pis. High school students organized 6th graders to do hands on data collection. They created a 10x12 foot exhibit that looked like a Martian landscape and highlighted the equipment they used with the plants still growing. The display included QR codes to communicate data and research using student-created videos, infographics, and data tables. Other installations include a monochromatic yellow room where everything looks grey and allowed observers to learn about the properties of light and the ways light energy is used in photosynthesis, the way it can be used to promote electrons, and the way it produces color. Other exhibits include sound waves and a history or music and musical instruments, the chemistry of color, and an environmental study of our use of carbon.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to guide students in the reading of scientific literature or the watching of documentaries in order to generate an authentic question and project. (How can we develop the capacity to farm on Mars? How does yellow monochromatic light produce the absence of color (an episode of Abstract, What can we learn about pollen structure from 3D printed files from Bayer’s agricultural division?) Participants will review a process to take the question and generate an authentic study that transcends a single class, grade, or discipline. (Students in 11th grade worked with students in 6th grade to test growing plants under controlled conditions that simulated Mars. Students in art and physics classes explored the properties of light and created a light-based art exhibit with science lessons on QR codes) Participants will explore a template for guiding students through the creation of an installation/exhibit that creatively shows the question, their experiment, their analysis, and potential solutions or conclusions in a creative and community-informing way. The exhibit is similar to an art installation with QR codes and experiment/study artifacts presented in a museum like scenario.

Speakers

Elizabeth Helfant (Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School: Saint Louis, MO)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Geometric String Art: Something for Everyone!

McCormick Place - W180

During this session, I will provide participants with black card stock, needles, string, graph paper and tape. We will start by creating the artwork as this will fuel the discussion later. I will walk participants through the steps using a guided slideshow with pictures. They will be given multiple options and allowed to experiment with their selections. I will give them time to work at their tables to create their art and walk around to help. The discussion portion will happen after the art creation. I will ask the groups to share their art with their table. The valuable portion of the session is when we will brainstorm the modifications that can be done to help all students access this activity. I will ask groups to discuss and share out as I create a list. I will add any modifications not already mentioned. Next, I would like the groups to discuss how this can be used in their classes, including the modifications they would need to suit their students. As a take away, participants will have a note taking sheet, access to the slideshow (includes examples and instructions), list of supplies needed and where to purchase, their beautiful artwork, and valuable discussions.

Takeaways: In addition to the art work, participants will leave with ideas, templates and modifications for a variety of students.

Speakers

Terri Serey (Orange Grove Middle School: Hacienda Heights, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Geometric String Art.pdf

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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The STEM of PBL

McCormick Place - W179b

Participants will understand how to develop and effectively implement STEM curriculum units that include project based activities and performance based assessments. Participants will learn to help students answer complex questions and develop solutions for challenges and real-world problems. They will also assist students with extending and refining their acquired knowledge to routinely analyze and solve problems. By the end of this session: 1) Participants will gain a clear and coherent understanding of what a STEM PBL is and how it works. 2) Participants will be able to identify and create effective essential questions. 3) Participants will be able to identify and apply the components of a STEM PBL. 4) Understand how STEM PBL’s will impact instruction for participants and students. Agenda: What is PBL? Why is it important? How does a STEM PBL Work? How to effectively integrate journal reflections. Ways to Implement STEM PBL’s

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to effectively implement STEM PBL’s (Project Based Learning) by integrating the components of STEM and PBL in order to grow students' capacity for creativity, fun, and back-loaded learning in a STEM context.

Speakers

Adero Carter (Clayton County Public Schools: Jonesboro, GA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

What Is PBL_ARTICLE.pdf
Why Is PBL Important_ARTICLE.pdf
Projects VS PBL.docx
_Main_Course.pdf
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HyFVEpZyEY
STEM PBL in action
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1c38TeuqPSC-vS8GLiVXQH9GzI7g0sjbx/view?usp=sharing
STEM PBL in action
http://bit.ly/STEMPBLQA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
Guiding questions
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
The Engineering Design Process/Journal Reflections

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Dumpster Dive with STEM

McCormick Place - W175c

Connect the human impact of trash pollution to engineering design. Get your students thinking critically and creatively as they collaborate in real-world problem-solving. The global real-world issue of human-generated trash polluting local bodies of water is the main focus of this hands-on session. Using our partnership with the Howard County Conservancy, our students learn about their local watersheds and contribute to a Watershed Report Card. Students see how trash that is often found on our local schoolyards can affect our watershed, and they design a working model for trash removal in a local tributary. Basic coding will be used to design programs that will control sensors and motors through a microcontroller, thus removing the trash from the water source. The model will utilize solar and water power to move the trash into a separate receptacle. Various sensors will also be used to monitor water levels and determine the outcome of the program. This session will allow participants to find ways to increase the environmental stewardship of their students while incorporating engineering design into the science classroom. This project allows authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

Takeaways: Design a project that enhances STEM skills in students such as collaboration, curiosity and creative problem solving.

Speakers

Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Dumpster Dive With STEM Participant Folder

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Evaluating STEM Curricula with Equity and Inclusivity in Mind

McCormick Place - W178b

Explore EiE’s curriculum design principles for inclusivity and NSTA’s sensemaking pillars as tools to evaluate curricula for inclusivity and equity.

Takeaways: Participants will leave this session with a framework for evaluating curricula with equity and inclusivity in mind.

Speakers

Diana Christopherson (Museum of Science, Boston: Boston, MA)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Solid Composite Propellant Model Rocket Science Education

McCormick Place - W194b

Sponsoring Company: AeroTech/Quest, Div. of RCS Rocket Motor Component

Explore the differences between aerospace-grade solid composite propellant model rocket motors and traditional black powder model rocket motors in science education, STEM programs, TARC Competition, and collegiate rocket team activities. We'll assemble a Quest Astra III model rocket kit during the workshop to take back to your classroom.

Takeaways: In model rocket science education, AeroTech/Quest products have been "STEM from the beginning!”™

Speakers

Dane Boles (AeroTech / Quest Divison of RCS Rocket Motor Components, Inc.: , United States)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Crosscutting Concepts: Using a Familiar Perspective to Understand Your World

McCormick Place - W471a

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

How do crosscutting concepts link the ideas and practices of science across different domains and over time? We’ll show you practical examples to see how crosscutting concepts provide a foundation for student sensemaking of phenomena and problems.

Takeaways: 1. Define the seven crosscutting concepts; 2. Learn strategies to incorporate crosscutting concepts into science lessons; and 3. Understand how crosscutting concepts support student sensemaking.

Speakers

Bridget Hughes-Binstock (Carolina Biological Supply Co.: Burlington, NC)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Beyond Labz: Realistic Virtual Labs That Bridge the Gap Between Real Labs and Scientific Inquiry

McCormick Place - W473

Sponsoring Company: Beyond Labz

Workshop Summary: Beyond Labz is a set of sophisticated and realistic virtual laboratories that have been used by millions of students over the past 20 years. Subjects covered by the virtual labs include general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, physical science, and biology. We have recently updated the virtual labs so they are browser-based with a number of new features including tracking student lab books and the student journey through the lab. With over 20 years of experience and feedback from students and teachers worldwide, we have learned much about how to enhance and augment classroom and laboratory instruction using the virtual labs. In this presentation we will provide a brief update on the new features in Beyond Labz, and we will provide onboarding instructions and describe how to use the virtual laboratories in various curriculum settings and use cases, and we will show the labs can be used to enhance inquiry-based instruction. We will also describe some of the recent research we have performed using these and other simulation products we have created.

Takeaways: Beyond Labz simplifies and reduces the cost and expertise needed to provide crucial laboratory experiences and practice for Secondary and Higher Ed students. Attendees will learn how the labs are used for pre and post lab experiences, credit recovery and lab make-up, student engagement in class, and meeting NGSS standards. Basic onboarding and startup instructions will be provided for drop-in solutions, and instructions for using some of the more sophisticated features will also be described.

Speakers

Brian Woodfield (Brigham Young University: Provo, UT)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Using Picture Book to Inspire STEM Learning, K–5

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

Learn how to integrate STEM and literacy through the use of high-quality STEM-related picture books.

Takeaways: Learn strategies for integrating STEM and literacy through the use of picture books in the K–5 classroom.

Speakers

Kim Stilwell (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Exploration Generation: Sensemaking in Rocketry from AIAA, Estes Rockets, and NSTA

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

This session will introduce participants to the Exploration Generation Middle School NSTA Playlist. It provides equitable STEM experiences to students and increases educator confidence in teaching rocketry. This two-lesson playlist brings Sensemaking to rocketry by cultivating student curiosity about rockets to drive learning about science ideas related to physics topics. Participants will investigate forces through hands-on engagement, while also learning about rocket safety. Learn how to develop critical skills within your students to prepare them for the careers of tomorrow.

Takeaways: The excitement and curiosity generated by model rocket launches can be used to drive student learning about a variety of physical science ideas.

Speakers

Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Nicole Bayeur (Estes Industries: , United States)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Exploration Generation: Sensemaking in Rocketry Collection

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Data and Storylines: The key to helping all students become STEM literate

McCormick Place - W176c

News bulletins on social media and news sites contain topics that students need to understand now so that they can make informed decisions for their world today and tomorrow. STEM literacy is crucial to learners struggling to understand the multitude of information bombarding them through television, social media and the internet. Students in K-12 must become STEM literate so that they can identify, understand and solve problems in the world around them. STEM Literacy promotes innovative thinking and creativity as well as collaboration, problem solving, and most importantly, critical thinking. Today’s challenges need answers from our students but first they need to understand issues including climate change, space travel, robotics. By using real-world applications of scientific data and storylines, students become critical consumers, problem-solvers, and change-makers. Students who are STEM literate will be able to think critically and act responsibly about issues that impact them. In this session, lessons and strategies will be shared with teachers to inspire and to support their students as they develop STEM literacy skills. These lessons will encourage students to explore, explain and develop solutions to real phenomena and solve real problems.

Takeaways: Three Takeaways: 1) Teachers will become familiar with technology, literacy and adaptive learning for middle school and high school students. 2) Teachers will be introduced to the free materials available that align with NGSS standards. 3) Teachers will be given ideas on how to incorporate these lessons in class

Speakers

Diane Ripollone (Cardinal Gibbons High School: Raleigh, NC), Kathy Biernat (Educational Consultant: Franklin, WI)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Data and Storylines
Resources for Teachers
Resource Folder
Resource Folder

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Executive Function Supports for Creating Inclusive Science Classrooms

McCormick Place - W179a

Come learn about simple, applicable strategies to support your students' executive function skills in the science classroom, with an emphasis on project planning, organization, flexible thinking, and time management.

Takeaways: Attendees will identify the educational impact of the 11 main executive functions, as well as learn concrete strategies for supporting their students in both general and special education settings.

Speakers

Krista Northcutt (New Way Academy: Phoenix, AZ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Presentation 7_21 (1).pdf
EF Supports for Inclusive Science Classrooms Presentation PDF
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1TUPMxotRYq0ZsboPp7i1jxMVKthb0vnv?usp=sharing

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Studying the Wright Brothers and Testing Airfoils: Bringing STEM into the History Classroom

McCormick Place - W184a

As a high school Engineering teacher, I'm passionate about the effects project-based learning can have on students' ability to engage with classroom material. I don't believe that hands-on STEM work needs to be limited to the science classroom and want to share a project that has been done in a freshman History class and could be adapted to incorporate other topics. Using online 3D modeling software, a 3D printer, and a wind generator, students studying the Wright brothers drew their own historically significant airfoils (like The Spirit of St. Louis and the Enola Gay), 3D printed them, and tested them. Students learned airfoil terminology, like camber and chord, and used airfoil ratios to create their scale models. While testing, we discussed the variations of the wings and why engineers might value payload capacity over speed based on the plane's use. My hope is that this presentation can encourage teachers to bring STEM concepts into other curricular departments as a way to demonstrate the types of connections students can make when they're working hands-on. This presentation will detail the steps of the project, materials needed, and highlight the challenges and lessons we've learned over the four years we've run this unit.

Takeaways: Attendees will see an example of how a STEM teacher brought project based learning into a freshman History class and how that project has evolved and expanded over four years. We will present the curriculum and materials needed for this week-long project for others to employ at their own schools.

Speakers

Abigail Mills (Woodberry Forest School: Woodberry Forest, VA)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Next Level Learning: Using Interactive STEM Cases to Power Up Thinking!

McCormick Place - W190b

Sponsoring Company: ExploreLearning

STEM cases are an integral part of meaningful inclusive and authentic learning. They can range from community awareness to global crises. Students can instantly make socio-emotional connections to the cases as the phenomenon they are reviewing can be happening just beyond the walls of their classrooms. (And studies show that when students make emotional connections, they are able to redirect more content into long-term memory storage!) In addition, STEM cases can support all students by differentiating delivery and assessment, using technology (which has its own modifications and accommodations), and by also providing handbooks for educators and students to create additional in depth pedagogy and experiences. Because we focus on the process, educators can assess science and engineering skills over time as students complete more than a dozen standards-based studies. Session Outline: 1) Participants will learn more about the value of providing a career-readiness approach to STEM learning. 2) We'll review the research behind an effective program like Interactive STEM Cases. 3) Participants will see how we can see real-time data collection and see how this approach makes sense to pause if we need to support a challenging concept 4) Participants will have an opportunity to jump into an Interactive STEM Case to get excited about adding this resource to their students’ tool kit.

Takeaways: The purpose of providing students with real-time scenarios to engage STEM enthusiasm.

Speakers

David Kanter (ExploreLearning: Charlottesville, VA)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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STEMscopes Showcase: What’s New at STEMscopes?

McCormick Place - W470a

Sponsoring Company: STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning

If you're using STEMscopes (or wanna-be), this session is for you. Come see examples of the EXCITING and NEW ASPECTS to the most popular digital science curriculum during this showcase. Discover program enhancements, Google integration, streaming, coding, engineering, and much more.

Takeaways: Learn about STEMscopes' various components and programs by experienced users in a hands-on setting.

Speakers

Kenneth Heydrick (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Amanda McGee (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Ashley Mathis (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Bobby Barron (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Jacque Garcia (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX), Tammy Motley (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

STEMscopes-2022-July21-STEMscopes-Showcase-NSTA.pdf

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 5:40 PM
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Meet Me in the Middle, Lite: A Share-a-Thon

McCormick Place - W183b

Engage in a variety of activities, collect information and resources, and network with middle level leaders. Discover new ideas and materials that you can use next week.

Takeaways: The participants will network with other middle level science educators and leaders to discover and engage in activities that will expand their knowledge and be usable in all aspects of their work.

Speakers

Mary Lou Lipscomb (National Middle Level Science Teachers Association: Naperville, IL), Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Carey Dieleman (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ), Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA), Suzanne Cunningham (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN), Katy Garvey (The Source for Learning, Inc.: Reston, VA), Nicole Green (Animalearn: Jenkintown, PA), Joseph Michaelis (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Kim Nagle (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Anne Farley Schoeffler (Seton Catholic School: Hudson, OH), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Corydon Strawser (Lake Nona Middle School: Orlando, FL), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA), Barbara Phillips-Bredlow (Northeast Nodaway School District: Ravenwood, MO), Dawn Konieczny (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Erin Towns (Edward Little High School: Auburn, ME)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

UIC Teacher Fellows Info
Informational Flyer on Teacher Fellows program to develop classroom learning companion robots

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Expanding Participation and Success in STEM Teaching Through Partnerships

McCormick Place - W181a

Ideas and concrete strategies for building collaborative, generative partnerships with community groups, nonprofits, preK–12 schools, museums, and community colleges in order to transform the STEM ecosystem and preservice teachers' futures will be shared.

Takeaways: Participants will: 1. hear from different partners about the generative ways we have collaborated to increase diversity in our STEM teacher preparation program; 2. engage in discussion and planning next steps for reaching out to a potential collaborative partner; and 3. learn about the ways in which preservice STEM Noyce Scholars have strengthened their STEM Identity and have been prepared to design culturally sustaining curricula and classrooms that integrate sensemaking.

Speakers

Sydney Worthen-Jenkins (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Nicole Hebert (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Bonnie Maur (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Kristin Rainville (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 5:40 PM
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Join Us for the Elementary STEM Showcase!

McCormick Place - W183a

Wander your way through 30 different STEM stations to learn about resources, lessons, and teaching strategies to incorporate more STEM into your school and classroom. This farmer's market–type event brings together educators, authors, researchers, and leaders in early childhood through fifth-grade STEM education. Leave with a mindful of great ideas and be inspired!

Takeaways: Pick up great ideas and be inspired during this farmer's market–type event.

Speakers

Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Heather Pacheco-Guffrey (Bridgewater State University: Bridgewater, MA), Lauren Burrow (Stephen F. Austin State University: Nacogdoches, TX), Susan Erickson (Country School: Weston, MA), Sara Nelson (Iowa State University: Ames, IA), Constance Beecher (Iowa State University: Ames, IA), Elizabeth Dethloff (Robert R. Shaw Center for STEAM: Katy, TX), Christine Preston (The University of Sydney: Sydney, Australia), Catherine Scott (Coastal Carolina University: Conway, SC), Kristin Cook (Bellarmine University: Louisville, KY), Richard Cox, Jr. (Winthrop University: Rock Hill, SC), Annette Venegas (Kent School District: Kent, WA), Juliette Guarino Berg (The Town School: New York, NY), Katie Morrison (University Child Development School: Seattle, WA), Wendi Laurence (Create-osity: Park City, UT), Katrina Kmak (Park City Library: Park City, UT), Brittnie Hecht (Park City Library: Park City, UT), Diana Lockwood (Consultant, Researcher & Author: , 0), Godwyn Morris (Dazzling Discoveries / Skill Mill NYC: New York, NY), Bridget Miller (University of South Carolina: Columbia, SC), Christie Martin (University of South Carolina: Columbia, SC), Rebecca Kurson (Collegiate School: New York, NY), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Shelly Counsell (The University of Memphis: Memphis, TN), Belle Akers (Convent & Stuart Hall's Schools of the Sacred Heart: San Francisco, CA), Kathleen Tate (American Public University System: Charles Town, WV), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS), Bill Burton (The Lamplighter School: Dallas, TX), Barbara Bromley (Hazelwood Elementary School: Lynnwood, WA), Kim Stilwell (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Nancy McIntyre (Robotics Education & Competition Foundation: Greenville, TX), Shari Haug (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL), Jane Savatski (Janet Berry Elementary School: Appleton, WI), Katrina Pavlik (Deputy Executive Director: Oakbrook Terrace, IL), Mitchell Rosenberg (Kinderlab Robotics, Inc.: Waltham, MA), Tiffany Leones (Digital Promise: Washington, DC), Beth Dykstra VanMeeteren (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA), Danielle Scharen (North Carolina State University: Raleigh, NC), Frances Hamilton (The University of Alabama in Huntsville: Huntsville, AL), Jennifer Williams (Isidore Newman School: New Orleans, LA), Anne Lowry (Aleph Academy: Reno, NV)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Exploring Energy Transfer in Ecosystems with SageModeler
Mindfulness Jar recipe
Mars Mission Specialist.pdf
Touch-Talk-Text Practices that support reading and science instruction

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Using GeoSpatial Data to Teach Climate Justice

McCormick Place - W176a

Let's discuss the expansion and availability of geospatial data (arcGIS, EJScreen, CalAdapt) to examine environmental justice issues in their own community and create climate resilience action plans for an authentic audience (city council, school district, state lawmakers).

Takeaways: Attendees will explore strategies for using geospatial data to examine, interpret, and act on place-based environmental justice issues in their communities.

Speakers

Nancy Metzger-Carter (Sonoma Academy: Santa Rosa, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation
Resources, curriculum, lesson plans, sample case studies of student advocacy
Link to Schools for Climate Action Campaign
Free resources for student advocacy for climate justice on local, state and federal level.

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Providing actionable feedback to build students’ self-reflection skills

McCormick Place - W181a

How many teacher comments on student work are left unread? Or, even if they are read, how useful are they to the student? Can the student positively internalize the feedback and use it to improve their work? Chances are the answer is no! But it doesn’t have to be this way! During this session, participants will learn more effective strategies for giving actionable feedback and methods to help their students utilize feedback to improve their work. First we’ll learn how to ask questions in student feedback and how differently questions are internalized by the student. For example, consider the difference between, “I don’t understand what you mean here,” and “Can you explain in more detail what you meant in this statement?” Then we’ll discover how to make sure teachers' feedback is read and used by students to improve their work. By making self reflection a formalized step in the learning process, teachers provide students opportunities to practice this important skill! Participants will receive a worksheet with feedback tips and tricks.

Takeaways: Several methods that can be applied immediately in the classroom, providing feedback encouraging students to be self reflective of their own work.

Speakers

Regina Borriello (Clifton High School: Edison, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Actionable Feedback.pdf

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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A Model for Recruiting and Retaining Hispanic Students in STEM Fields

McCormick Place - W181b

Learn how to create a pipeline, beginning in elementary school, to engage Hispanic students in STEM fields.

Takeaways: Develop and implement a pipeline from elementary school to community college in STEM subjects to engage Hispanic students.

Speakers

Kelly Moore-Roberts (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN), Elesha Goodfriend (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Planning More Accessible Science Lessons with Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

McCormick Place - W184d

In this presentation we will start with an existing basic physical science lesson that uses disciplinary core ideas on electricity, the engineering practice of making a model by constructing a basic electrical circuit, and the cross-cutting concept of cause and effect (closing the circuit starts current flow and turns on the light). We will then modify it using Universal Design for Learning (UDL) so it is more accessible, especially for students with disabilities. UDL encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson and gives students several ways to acquire the lesson knowledge, Multiple means of expression allows the students several choices in how they can “show what they know” and multiple means of engagement offers learners offers appropriate challenges to get students interested and motivated. Planning or modifying lessons using UDL not only makes lessons more accessible, but it also makes lessons more engaging for all students in inclusive classrooms.

Takeaways: 1) Universal Design for Learning (UDL) encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson. Use of UDL makes lessons more engaging for all students. 2) Applying UDL (Universal Design for Learning) will make the lesson more accessible, especially for students with special needs. 3) You may start with a lesson you already have. It is not necessary to develop a lesson from scratch when using UDL.

Speakers

Mary Ellen O'Donnell (The Help Group: Los Angeles, CA), Gargi Adhikari (Holland Brook School: Whitehouse Station, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pdf
Final Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pptx
Speaking like a scientist.pdf - Inv. Part 1.pdf
Claims and evidence.jpg
Debate.jpg

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Making Group Work Fair: The Potential Pitfalls of Student Peer Evaluations

McCormick Place - W178b

Although group projects have been shown to increase learning and cooperation, bullying can sneak into student peer evaluations. Examples and alternatives to ghosting presented.

Takeaways: Science classrooms are a great place for group projects to enhance learning, but students may unwittingly be ghosted from their group, ultimately making them seem like they are not a team player. We as teachers must be diligent against bullying/ghosting.

Speakers

Diane Huelskamp (Wright State University-Lake Campus: Celina, OH)

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Build a K–12 STEAM Pipeline Through Family STEAM Night

McCormick Place - W180

Engage students, families, and the community in STEAM through Family STEAM Nights in order to equitably build understanding and interest in STEAM.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to create, recruit, and implement a Family STEAM Night to engage students, families, and the community in STEAM.

Speakers

McKenna Serowka (Lake Zurich High School: Lake Zurich, IL)

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Inspiration to Fruition

McCormick Place - W185a

Inspiration to Fruition provides any educator with a game plan on how to take an idea and available resources and create a project that enhances the student experience and skills.

Takeaways: 1. A template for designing a grassroots STEM or PBL project; 2. Top 10 tips on how to make managing the project actually manageable; and 3. Proof that trusting one's intuition to build a project based on an inspirational event can bring to fruition an amazing experience for students.

Speakers

Kelly Hartings (Indian Hill Middle School: Cincinnati, OH), Jessica Brown (Teacher: cincinnati, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Inspiration to Fruition

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Unmasking Engineering Practices

McCormick Place - W175c

In this hands-on workshop, participants will make and preform tests on COVID masks to use engineering practices to design a mask that is both comfortable and protective.

Takeaways: Inquiry-based STEM is a collaborative process in which students act and think like engineers and scientists to make the learning environment inclusive for ALL learners.

Speakers

Karen Ostlund (The University of Texas at Austin: Austin, TX)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Local Phenomenon-Based Projects

McCormick Place - W185d

Learn how to better integrate local phenomena into classroom learning through the use of long-term projects and a competition.

Takeaways: Strategies to use student-chosen local phenomena as the basis for long-term projects and participation in a national STEM competition.

Speakers

Winnie Boyle (Army Educational Outreach Program: , United States)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Phenomena to Questions: Practical Engagement Strategies for Student Sensemaking

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Explore how to use phenomena to generate student questions that allow for further investigation to support student sensemaking.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to effectively use phenomena to allow for authentic student questioning and how to use those questions to increase student engagement and sensemaking.

Speakers

Nicole Vick (Northwestern University: No City, No State)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Phenomena to Questions .pdf

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Robots in Science! Integrating robotics and computational thinking into middle school science classrooms

McCormick Place - W181b

Robotics activities can be an engaging and innovative way to help students learn core science concepts, while also introducing engineering design and computer programming. In this session, participants will learn about three robotics activities that help students engage with physical science concepts. Educators will hear about: (1) an activity involving speed and acceleration. Through a combination of activities students explored and calculated speed. After walking and running at intervals, students built vehicles to show speed and acceleration, ultimately graphing data to compare constant speed and acceleration; (2) ways in which students applied knowledge and skills learned during a PLTW Design and Modeling class as they designed and built a prototype toy for use in therapy with children with Cerebral Palsy or other disabilities; (3) how students used robots to explain a concept from a light and sound unit to peers and students from younger grades. Students selected one of the concepts from a light and sound unit, made a display, built a robot, and prepared a presentation to explain their concept and how it works in the world outside our classroom.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how using robotics activities in science and engineering classes can support and enhance students’ learning of physical science concepts, while also engaging students in problem solving and engineering design processes.

Speakers

Richard Shroyer (Logos Lab School: Richmond, IN), Tiauna Washington (Hibberd Intermediate School: Richmond, IN), Debra Bernstein (TERC: Cambridge, MA), McCall Emerick (Acmetonia Elementary School: Cheswick, PA)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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NGSS-Focused Summative Classroom Assessments of Three-Dimensional Learning

McCormick Place - W185a

Explore classroom-tested benchmark assessments and scoring guides you can use to assess students’ three-dimensional learning related to middle school performance expectations.

Takeaways: Educators will learn about a comprehensive set of free, summative benchmark 3-D assessments designed to be used in any NGSS-focused middle school classroom.

Speakers

Maia Binding (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA), Wendy Jackson (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NGSS Summative Assessments_NSTA_Chicago_2022.pdf

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Python Coding with Vernier Sensors

McCormick Place - W471b

Sponsoring Company: Vernier Software & Technology

Learn how to integrate Vernier sensor data into Python coding. Explore how coding can enhance your students’ experience in the science classroom by providing another avenue of engagement. Teachers of science and coding alike will benefit from this hands-on workshop.

Takeaways: 1. Gain experience with hands-on technology that encourages students to explore and test different solutions and make connections to the real world; 2. Get access to free resources to keep students engaged while learning key scientific concepts either remotely or in the lab; and 3. Gain hands-on experiences with innovative products that increase student engagement, promote creativity and collaboration, and develop problem-solving skills.

Speakers

Tom Smith (Vernier Software & Technology: Beaverton, OR), Dave Vernier (Vernier Software & Technology: Beaverton, OR)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Now Trending: Science Simulations to Make Things Stick!

McCormick Place - W190b

Sponsoring Company: ExploreLearning

Everyday events make us wonder. Some events are easily explained, while others cannot. When these events are examined and tested through virtual simulations, they give students an opportunity to think. Why do some objects float and others sink? What is the difference between a solar eclipse and a lunar eclipse and how often does that happen? Learn how to use virtual simulations to help students dig deeper and get inspired by science and STEM phenomenon! Through this highly interactive session, educators will be able to understand the added value of including simulations to their current lab practices. Although hands-on activities are always important, simulations allow for a deeper understanding of content for all students. When coupled with hands-on learning, students can create more moments to explore, discover and apply new concepts. Simulations are repeatable (to allow for trial and error) so students can practice skills again and again to make STEM concepts stick!

Takeaways: Use of virtual simulations builds a deeper understanding of concepts.

Speakers

Jenna Mercury (ExploreLearning: Charlottesville, VA)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Discussion-Based Learning: How to Use Talk as a Tool

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Academic discourse is a vital part of promoting student sensemaking. Learn how discourse can be used to promote equity and access in the science classroom.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to use discussion strategies in the classroom to move student thinking forward, use talk as a formative assessment, and build a classroom culture that promotes student discussion.

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Cheryl Knight (Orland Junior High School: Orland Park, IL)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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The Scoop on STEM Competitions Administered by NSTA

McCormick Place - W176a

Join us for a chance to learn more about  NSTA-administered competitions and awards from NSTA staff and past participants. NSTA-administered competitions include NSTA Teacher Awards, the Army Educational Outreach Program, Shell Science Lab Regional Challenge, and Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision competitions. This engaging hour will include discussion and tips on how to engage K–12 students in project-based learning opportunities that are no cost to participate.

Takeaways: 1. Engage with educators that have participated in NSTA-administered competitions and awards; 2. Learn more about opportunities to engage students in project-based learning; and 3. Share best practices and tips to foster inquiry-based learning and showcase ideas.

Speakers

Acacia McKenna (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Competitions_ presentation.pdf

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Getting Elementary Students Engaged in Science Early—Cheetahs, Elephants, Monkeys, Oh My! Becoming Animal Reporters

McCormick Place - W192b

Sponsoring Company: Imagine Learning/Twig

Participants will use their binoculars (made with their own hands) to participate in video investigations as animal reporters. First, we will discuss how to interpret and implement the NGSS that align with these lessons. Next, we will dig into video investigations of an elephant herd and answer some thinking questions on the video. Then, we will observe and compare animal body parts and animal defenses. Participants will be introduced to the amazing Oogpister Beetle and get a close up look at its unique defense capabilities. Then, we will talk about ELA connections with these science lessons and dig deeper into ELD support for students while using leveled readers. We will read about an actual practicing animal researcher while providing support and ELA connections. Then, we will discuss a dual language approach to teaching these lessons using Spanish resources. Finally, we will discuss how the videos and lessons are engaging for students while highlighting some student work examples.

Takeaways: Use highly-engaging real word topics to develop scientific literacy.

Speakers

Christopher Borjas (Santa Rosa Academy: Menifee, CA), Patricia Pape (Imagine Learning: Scottsdale, AZ)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Hands-On Plus! Driving Student-Centered Learning with Smithsonian Science for the Classroom K–5

McCormick Place - W471a

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

How does hands-on learning incorporate digital and print resources to promote active learning? See how Smithsonian Science for the Classroom engages students with science and engineering practices and promotes scientific literacy for all students.

Takeaways: 1. Experience a model lesson from Smithsonian Science for the Classroom; 2. Learn how to effectively integrate hands-on, print, and digital resources; and 3. Pick up strategies for putting student ideas front and center.

Speakers

Cory Ort (Carolina Biological Supply Co.: Burlington, NC)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Learning Better Science Practices with Science Fair Projects

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 5

A former national science fair judge provides insights on how good titles can improve the odds of winning at science fairs. The poster will describe what the parts of a "good" title are and how teachers can help your students create one.

Takeaways: Teachers will learn the components of a good project title (from an research project on science fairs) and how to help their students develop a good title for their own project.

Speakers

G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Global Conversations: International Film Festival and Share-a-thon

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 21

In this self-directed session, you will be able to: Interact with educators in face-to-face poster presentations; Watch short video submissions from educators around the world; and Participate in hands-on/minds-on, takeaway learning experiences.

Takeaways: Science education occurs everywhere on this planet. We can get ideas and best practices from collegues around the world.

Speakers

Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)