2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:Hands-On Workshop, General Science

 

54 results

Increasing Scientific Literacy: Strategies, Free Activities, and Resources That Work!

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W178a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Participants will learn strategies and receive numerous resources that increase students’ scientific literacy. The hands-on approach has participants engaged in the activities, games, and more.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will: 1. learn new strategies for incorporating scientific literacy into their lessons; and 2. receive numerous activities, templates, games, and other resources to help with doing this. These resources can be used “as is” or modified to allow for differentiation based on the needs of the learners. Strategies and resources will include ones effective with ELL and EC students.

SPEAKERS:
Iris Mudd (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools: Winston Salem, NC)

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) - An Effective Approach to Ensuring an Inclusive Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines are a tool that can be used to design learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners (CAST, 2018). Instructional designers and teachers can use these principles to create learning environments that reduce barriers to access for all students, while keeping in mind the learning goals of the lesson. The three guiding principles of UDL are engagement, representation, and action and expression. In this session educators will be provided with examples of these principles in action in sample materials from OpenSciEd and classroom videos. In these examples, participating will identify how the materials have been purposefully designed with multiple avenues for engagement, representation, and action and expression. Additionally, they will identify the built-in supports for teachers to highlight student assets and to address potential barriers to learning for their local student population. Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Now I see it! Now I get it!

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W184d


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Without out a doubt the recent pandemic has demonstrated that, the efforts in the science classroom towards scientific literacy are more relevant than ever. In this session participants will learn simple effective visual literacy tools and strategies that make learning science visible to all students, supporting diversity and reinforcing scientific literacy skills that help students make sense of the world. The strategies and tools used in this presentation will highlight the need to incorporate visual literacy as current brain research shows that around 60% of information we process every day comes in visual form. Sometimes chunking content to smaller learning bites can lower the understanding of concepts and ideas, especially if these concepts are abstract in nature; learning how to maximize the use of visuals both student and teacher made supports deeper understanding not just on a particular concept but of how they are connected making sense of the world. These strategies support cultural competency as they support learner diversity while working on scientific literacy skills such as use of evidence/data, pose questions, find answers. By having a common visual as point of reference along with strategy and tools not only closes the gap on background knowledge and makes accessible to all students but also helps student and teachers have meaningful discourse highlighting students strengths to solve real world problems.

TAKEAWAYS:
In this session participants will learn simple effective visual literacy tools and strategies that make learning science visible to all students, supporting diversity and reinforcing scientific literacy skills that help students make sense of the world.

SPEAKERS:
Marjorie Miles Dozier (Polk County Public Schools: Bartow, FL)

Text to Investigation: An Expansion of a Common Reading Connections Strategy

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W179a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

According to the 2018 NSSME Survey, 77% of elementary teacher’s self-report that they feel very well prepared to teach reading/language arts and only 31% rate their preparedness for science at the same level. Furthermore, the description of activities that elementary teachers indicate students participate in show reading about science or engaging in hands-on laboratory activities at just under 50%. Furthermore, students gain a deeper understanding of a text when they make authentic connections. Science investigations that incorporate phenomenon are perfect vehicles for students to make authentic connections. Students who make connections while reading are better able to understand the text they are reading. It is important for students to draw on their prior knowledge and experiences to connect with the text. Students are thinking when they are connecting, which makes them more engaged in the reading experience. The Framework even stresses that “students should be asked to engage in the communication of science, especially regarding the investigations they are conducting…” (p. 76) This session will focus on the expansion of a common strategic reading strategy related to “text to connections”, elementary teachers can support students in constructing understanding and connecting it to their own life.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore and learn how to how to expand a common literacy strategy of “text to” connections when using picture books in the elementary science classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Christine Anne Royce (Shippensburg University: Shippensburg, PA)

Supporting Civically Engaged Argument Writing in Science and Technology Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W178b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Guided Session Notes and Resources

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Participants will use a graphic organizer to record their thinking as I describe a unit I taught in which students in grades 9-12 explored issues related to artificial intelligence. Students crafted op-Eds advocating for what we should do in our community about emerging technologies like driverless cars and facial recognition. As I describe the unit, I will highlight how I (1) kicked off the unit with a phenomenon that raised questions about convenience, safety, security, equity, and justice; (2) layered on texts and encouraged students to grapple with multiple perspectives on AI-related issues; (3) used routines and mentor texts to support students in crafting claims and connecting evidence to their claims; and (4) engaged students in processes of revision. Then, participants will work in self-selected groups to explore science/technology/society text sets on topics like lab grown meat and space debris. As they explore the text set, they will engage with a classroom routine to develop a compelling, debatable, defensible, and nuanced claim. Participants will share what they discovered as they explored the text set and wrote claims in their group and will reflect on how these text sets and routines might become part of their classroom practice.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about freely available text sets and classroom routines developed by teachers for supporting civically engaged argument writing about science and technology issues in society.

SPEAKERS:
John Smith (Chester A Arthur School: Philadelphia, PA)

Strategies to Elevate Students Scientific Literacy with Real-World Data

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document of links and the slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Science literacy is essential to be informed and engaged citizens in the 21st century. Data are what we use to do science. Thus, reading and making sense of real-world data are fundamental skills to being scientifically literate and a fun way to engage learners with science. However, how do we incorporate data into K-8 science without feeling overburdened with yet another thing to teach? By integrating it into what we are already doing! Join us to explore the connections between data, science, and literacy. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. The goal is to increase our data toolkit of strategies and resources to increase science literacy and relevance for students. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better helps students do and communicate science. Working with and learning from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ literacy skills. Let’s set our students up for success now and in the future!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into K-8 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Humanizing Science: A Rubric for Evaluating Science Trade Books

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W175c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Humanizing Science Workshop Resources
Access workshop slides, materials, completed examples, and a searchable Outstanding Science Trade Book list at this link.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Trade books are often used to support science instruction, and are an effective way to connect ideas about how science works to classroom science experiences. In this workshop, we will share a rubric for evaluating trade books for science read-alouds and discuss how the tool can be used to inform instruction (e.g., developing discussion questions). The rubric focuses on four concepts related to humanizing science, and aligned with views of nature of science in the Next Generation Science Standards: Science is done by diverse people, Scientists interpret empirical evidence to support their claims, Scientists use a variety of methods, and Scientists are creative at all stages of their investigations. These four concepts support students’ understanding of how science works, laying the foundation for being an effective consumer of science. Additionally, these four concepts present a more accurate representation of scientists, in contrast with many long-standing stereotypes about scientists. Attendees will have the opportunity to use the rubric to analyze elementary-level science trade books and develop a plan for implementing the read-alouds in class. We will conclude by examining how teachers can layer selected trade books effectively into their existing science curriculum.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn why representing science as a human activity is important for students’ understanding of how science works, and will learn how to select and plan for read-alouds of books that humanize science into their existing science curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
Jeanne Brunner (University of Massachusetts Amherst: Amherst, MA), Kathleen Mahoney (Doctoral Student: , 0)

Inclusive, Hands-on Science Instruction for Elementary Students K-5

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W186c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

As a K-5 English Learner Teacher, I work with all grades, and for the last five years I've been helping students reach NGSS Performance Expectations through inductive, hands-on science lessons. I’m also a Science Methods Professor at North Central College, where I coach pre-service teachers in how to create and teach NGSS-aligned, three-dimensional science lessons. In this session, teachers will experience several hands-on mini-lessons and explore the meaning of inductive learning in science. Teachers will inductively discover how circuits work and engineer solutions for erosion. We’ll also use digital microscopes to explore the needs of plants and the structure and function living things, so please bring a device with a USB port if you can. Throughout the session, I’ll showcase digital portfolio examples from my K-5 students over the last 5 years. Elementary teachers are often intimidated by teaching and assessing the ambitious performance expectations of the NGSS, especially given the limited class time available for science instruction. Incorporating experiential science lessons with reading, writing, and speaking allows cross-curricular connections with ELA. Teachers will see many examples of digital notebooks used with English Learners and special education students for ongoing performance assessment of both Science and ELA standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Inductive, and inclusive hands-on science experiences and the use of digital portfolios lead to deeper learning as well as ELA & Math connections for K-5 students.

SPEAKERS:
Melissa Eaton (Cowlishaw Elementary School: Naperville, IL)

STEM for All! Benefits of STEM Integration for Struggling to Gifted Learners, and Everyone in Between

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W187b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
NSTA_STEMforALL.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

To effectively engage audience members, I will balance their readiness to learn, cognitive load, and stimulating activities. Using real-world examples, I will demonstrate the power of STEM in elementary classrooms to grow all learners and provide necessary 21st-century skills. Often STEM is an enrichment offered to high-achiever but struggling learners have even more to gain from STEM including confidence and leadership. I will focus on practical application, but valuable references and data will be included to support my practices. I will begin the session with a survey to identify the needs and perceptions of participants regarding STEM integration. Based on input, I will share research-based strategies, classroom integration examples, or dispel misconceptions. I will include an interactive STEM activity using index cards and paper clips to provide a STEM lesson model and demonstrate the ease of integrating STEM with simple, classroom supplies. Participants will leave the session with a better understanding of the benefits of STEM in K-5 classrooms and feel more comfortable integrating STEM into their own classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will understand the value of STEM integration beyond the four letters of the acronym, including the benefits of productive struggle of high achievers and how the grit of struggling learners are paramount in the success of STEM challenges.

SPEAKERS:
Erika Neuman (Bulverde Creek Elementary School: San Antonio, TX)

Hands-on with Climate Science!

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W175c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Students may commonly hear the terms carbon dioxide, greenhouse gases, global warming, and climate change. It is important to understand climate science and climate change, and how energy use and consumer choices impact our environment, economics, and standard of living. Session participants will learn hands-on activities to use with their students to develop a better understanding of climate science. They will first explore NEED’s Greenhouse in a Beaker to observe how greenhouse gases, like CO2, act in our atmosphere through the use of common lab equipment. Can I Really Fry and Egg on the Sidewalk uses an infrared thermometer to showcase how radiant energy is absorbed by various surfaces at different rates and be able to see how different surfaces and the spaces surrounding them can have elevated temperatures, leading to a heat island effect. Road Trip involves calculating the carbon impact of transportation choices to learn about their carbon footprint.

SPEAKERS:
Cori Nelson (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA)

The Meaning Beyond the Words

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W178a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
https://my.nsta.org/collection/ktURlAGyUA4_E

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

For years, research on the language of classrooms explored how the way we say things impacts students’ sense of belonging. This session uses the NSTA Teacher Tip Tuesday—The Meaning Beyond The Words: How Language, Race, and Culture Impact Science Teaching and Learning web seminar to consider how we signal to students that we value their ideas and how they communicate those ideas in the science classroom and what we can do as educators to help ensure our students know they belong in the classroom and can do science. Participants will learn about opportunities to continue the learning after the session ends through NSTA’s new Professional Learning Units.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Become aware of how we signal (or don’t signal) to students their ideas and how they communicate their ideas are valued in the science classroom; and 2. Learn strategies to support students in building on their ideas and each other's ideas to move toward building deep conceptual understanding of big ideas in science (disciplinary core ideas).

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Broaden Science Participation: Unpack “Analyze & Interpret” to Teach Data As an Equalizer

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document and a slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

We live in a data-driven world, and our students will be working in a data-driven workforce. Therefore, it is critical that our Pre-K-12 students learn foundational data literacy skills. However, currently these skills are too often only taught in upper-level classes. All students need these skills and all students, down to our little Pre-Kers, can work with and make sense of science data. Let’s make sure data is an equalizer, rather than another divider in our educational system and society! Join us as we explore what perception and learning science tell us about how our brains process data. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources to build science knowledge and self-efficacy through data. Finally, we will explore ways to adapt our existing curriculum activities and data visualizations to help our students more equitably access science. Through hands-on activities and group discussions, participants will leave more empowered to leverage data and data visualizations into their science content in purposeful ways for all learners. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall 21st century skills. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century for all students and ways to adjust existing curriculum to leverage data as entry points into science inquiry, sensemaking, and knowledge for all learners to see themselves in STEM.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Half-Earth Project Inclusive Mapping Design Challenge and Hummingbird Guided Inquiry

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W196a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

The Half-Earth Project team-based Mapping Design Challenge engages students in authentic teamwork to use digital mapping to design their own biodiversity conservation choices.

TAKEAWAYS:
Digital mapping motivated by exploring charismatic species draws diverse students into the multidisciplinary science of conservation decision-making where species, human impacts, and stakeholders have to be considered.

SPEAKERS:
Dennis Liu (E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation: Durham, NC)

Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

Stop “doing” data and start “using” data! Utilizing Google forms and sheets to collect and analyze data so you can focus on what comes next!

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W179a


STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

So many data conversations fall flat because of current methods of data collection. What if we could vary the type and frequency we collect and analyze data using google forms and spreadsheets? This would allow us to have more in-depth conversations about what the data is say and how we can use it to move instruction forward. In this session, 5 different tools will be presented to teachers that allows them to collect data in different ways. With these tools, the focus is no longer on the past and why things happened, but focus on the future of what we can do to respond to the data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn about and receive templates for multiple tools using google forms and spreadsheets to realize the vision of a good data conversation

SPEAKERS:
Rocco Williams (Fort Worth ISD: Fort Worth, TX)

Teaching Grey Water Reuse and Water Recycling

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Water: It’s constantly in use all around us, but did you know that you can recycle water just like paper or plastic? Droughts and water scarcity are becoming an increasingly common phenomenon, and it is estimated that nearly 6 billion people will suffer from clean water scarcity by 2050. Yet, every year, Americans throw 11 trillion gallons of reusable water, also known as grey water, down the drain. In this series of lessons, students will learn about where their water comes from, the human water cycle, the three types of water and the connection between droughts and climate change. These lessons will also tie into the broader themes of sustainability and climate science and incorporate hands-on STEM activities and career connections. The lessons are primarily for elementary students but can be adapted for older audiences. They will be free for all teachers to use in their classrooms and are developed by Shreya Ramachandran, founder of The Grey Water Project in concert with educators. Join us for the presentation to learn more about grey water, why teaching about grey water and water conservation is important and how you can bring this to your classroom!

TAKEAWAYS:
Session participants will learn about grey water reuse and water recycling and how they can be effective drought solutions.

SPEAKERS:
Shreya Ramachandran (Stanford University: Stanford, CA)

Science Teachers ARE Math Teachers: Integrating Mathematical Thinking into Sensemaking

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W185a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Using real-world phenomena asks students to puzzle out answers to problems that occur in their day-to-day lives. It encourages students to enter into sensemaking using their own prior knowledge and tools. One of the best tools to make sense of a phenomenon is math. Learn from CCSS Math and NGSS specialists about using mathematical thinking to promote scientific literacy. This session includes a focus on student agency, sensemaking, and supporting connections between the STEM classroom and real-world phenomena. The presenters will map CCSS Mathematics and NGSS connections while providing strategies for increasing agency and sensemaking in the classroom. Questions we will consider include: How do we support all students in becoming mathematical thinkers? How do we promote agency by providing students with authentic, engaging opportunities to collect, analyze, and interpret real-world data? How can phenomena and questioning techniques support mathematical thinking?  Come explore new possibilities of what high-quality sensemaking with math can look like for all learners.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will take away strategies to integrate mathematical thinking into student sensemaking about scientific phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Emily Mathews (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Alanna Mertens (DePaul University STEM Center: Chicago, IL)

Chickenology: Food Delivery Challenge

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Lesson
Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Slide Deck
Chickenology Student Rubric

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Participants will use sensemaking and the engineering design process to solve a real world food production problem in a small scale format. This lesson introduces the Food Delivery Challenge, in which participants must design a gravity feeder to carry food (chicken feed) to twelve hungry chickens for over 24 hours. To accomplish the task students must design and build a model of an efficient gravity feeder using the materials available to them. The scenario presented to the class: One of the feeders in your uncle’s barn has broken down, and a new one will not arrive until next month. You must create a gravity feeder to satisfy 12 chickens for 24 hours consistently to ensure the health of your flock. Participants will research, design, build and test their design before presenting to the group for feedback, Participants will then use the feedback to redesign for an improved feeder.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Use the engineering design process to collaborate, design and build a gravitational feeder system that will feed 10 pounds of feed over a 24 hour period. 2. Present your design plan, and final product to the class for feedback. 3. Provide feedback to the design team for design improvement.

SPEAKERS:
Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH), Heather Bryan (Nourish the Future - Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Effective Discourse Strategies for Creating Inclusive STEM Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

This session by members of NSTA’s Professional Learning Committee is designed to help teachers deepen their understanding of the effective and practical strategies to facilitate academic discourse that promotes inclusive science and STEM classrooms. Participants will engage in a variety of instructional strategies to ensure that all students have access to scientific discourse, and opportunities to collaborate with peers, through intentional planning. Participants will engage in a variety of formative assessment classroom techniques (FACTS) from Page Keeley’s Uncovering Student Ideas texts, including commit and toss, pro/con pairs, structured think-pair-share, and more. In addition, we will be discussing the shift away from traditional talk patterns- like I-R-E (Initiate, Response, Evaluation) and towards Productive Talk to promote an inclusive science and STEM classroom where discourse supports student sensemaking. Finally, we will provide resources and discussion around the “lead4ward Instructional Strategies Playlist”, which provides teachers with detailed descriptions of specific, instructional strategies. Links to additional discourse resources will also be provided. The instructional strategies used in this presentation will promote student engagement, differentiation, and scientific understanding to help form a more inclusive learning environment where all students can participate in scientific discourse.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will experience a variety of impactful instructional strategies that promote scientific discourse to help create an inclusive STEM learning environment.

SPEAKERS:
Kimberley Astle (Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction: Olympia, WA), Rebecca Garelli (Arizona Dept. of Education: Phoenix, AZ), Angela McMurry (The Ohio Academy of Science: Dublin, OH)

Dumpster Dive with STEM

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Dumpster Dive With STEM Participant Folder

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Connect the human impact of trash pollution to engineering design. Get your students thinking critically and creatively as they collaborate in real-world problem-solving. The global real-world issue of human-generated trash polluting local bodies of water is the main focus of this hands-on session. Using our partnership with the Howard County Conservancy, our students learn about their local watersheds and contribute to a Watershed Report Card. Students see how trash that is often found on our local schoolyards can affect our watershed, and they design a working model for trash removal in a local tributary. Basic coding will be used to design programs that will control sensors and motors through a microcontroller, thus removing the trash from the water source. The model will utilize solar and water power to move the trash into a separate receptacle. Various sensors will also be used to monitor water levels and determine the outcome of the program. This session will allow participants to find ways to increase the environmental stewardship of their students while incorporating engineering design into the science classroom. This project allows authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Design a project that enhances STEM skills in students such as collaboration, curiosity and creative problem solving.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Exploring Energy Forms and Transformations in the Real World

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W185a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

NEED’s Science of Energy stations provide a hands-on approach to experimenting with objects used in student’s daily lives while incorporating scientific processing skills such as making observations, measuring, recording results, compare and contrast, categorize, make predictions, analyze and graph results, and draw conclusions. Workshop participants will rotate through six stations just as their students would in the classroom or OST Program, to learn about the different forms of energy and energy transformations using objects such as a toy car, apple, yo-yo, compass, bouncy ball, glow stick, etc. Using the same materials, the station guides can be easily differentiated for elementary, intermediate, and secondary levels. Each station includes a "What's Happening" article that provides additional informational text on the energy transformation that took place at the station and ties to more real-life examples for further visualization and understanding. The station guides have been correlated to each state’s individual science and math standards, as well as effectively support Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Workshop participants will engage in hands-on experiments just as their students would, using items we encounter in our daily lives that demonstrate energy forms and their transformations and applications to real-life examples for further visualization and understanding.

SPEAKERS:
Cori Nelson (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA)

Equitable and Authentic Assessments: Success of Collaborative Lab Practicums in the Middle or High School Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W181c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
BaderFinal_NSTA_Equitable & Authentic Assessments_ Classroom Examples & Lessons Learned..pptx
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1rjo2SflrfK32XZDABImR9Y7jBYwv_D4a/edit#slide=id.p42

STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Applying principles of Understanding By Design and Visible Thinking, learn how to design and implement authentic and equitable assessments in any middle school or high school science classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will walk away with easy-to-implement, real-world examples of collaborative lab practicums.

SPEAKERS:
Aruna Chavali (The Spence School: New York, NY), Laura Bader (The Spence School: New York, NY)

Data, Tables, Graphs, Oh My! Strategies to Get All Students Doing & Speaking Science

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Access to Resource Document
Complete the Google Form to gain access to the Resource Document and slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

We are naturally curious, prone to ask why? How? What? Unfortunately, somewhere along the way students lose the trust in their voices to ask questions of and from data. But data are what we use to do science and it permeates all aspects of society today. What should we do? Stop teaching the vocabulary of science and data first, and instead leverage classroom-ready strategies to empower students to lead with their innate curiosity to practice critical 21st century data literacy skills and master the science content. Join us to explore connections between our science content, inquiry-based activities, and data skills. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy and student empowerment. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better help students do and communicate science. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall self-identity as a scientist. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century, how students can do a lot more with data than we often think or presume from their science vocabulary alone, and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into 6-12 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Using Picture Book to Inspire STEM Learning, K–5

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Learn how to integrate STEM and literacy through the use of high-quality STEM-related picture books.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn strategies for integrating STEM and literacy through the use of picture books in the K–5 classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Kim Stilwell (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Using the Scientific Process to Conquer Smallpox

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W196a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

We can examine natural phenomena and address wicked problems using the scientific process. The smallpox virus emerged approximately 10,000 years ago, and the virus's global spread devastated civilizations. Thanks to the scientific thinking of a Buddhist nun, a milkmaid, and Edward Jenner, smallpox was declared eradicated in 1979 by the World Health Organization. To support the understanding of the nature of science in the NGSS (Appendix H), session participants will engage in activities that demonstrate how science is used to answer questions about the natural world through a process that is consistent, observational, natural, predictable, tentative, and testable. Additionally, participants will examine various media sources to learn how to identify scientific misinformation and the tactics used to make misinformation appear credible. The National Center for Science Education supports science teachers through free professional development and curriculum to recognize and address science misconceptions using the three dimensions of the NGSS. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
This session introduces participants to a basic understanding of the scientific process, how our knowledge of the natural world evolves with new evidence, and that science cannot answer questions that do not pertain to natural processes. Attendees will take a deep dive into an NGSS storyline sequence developed to help students understand that science is an ongoing process that must be supported by multiple lines of evidence to be accepted by the scientific community.

SPEAKERS:
Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), DeeDee Wright (Colorado State University: Fort Collins, CO), Cari Herndon (National Center for Science Education: No City, No State), Ayesha Alirahi (Science Teacher: , 0), Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Exploration Generation: Sensemaking in Rocketry from AIAA, Estes Rockets, and NSTA

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Exploration Generation: Sensemaking in Rocketry Collection

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session will introduce participants to the Exploration Generation Middle School NSTA Playlist. It provides equitable STEM experiences to students and increases educator confidence in teaching rocketry. This two-lesson playlist brings Sensemaking to rocketry by cultivating student curiosity about rockets to drive learning about science ideas related to physics topics. Participants will investigate forces through hands-on engagement, while also learning about rocket safety. Learn how to develop critical skills within your students to prepare them for the careers of tomorrow.

TAKEAWAYS:
The excitement and curiosity generated by model rocket launches can be used to drive student learning about a variety of physical science ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Nicole Bayeur (Estes Industries: , United States)

Meet Me in the Middle, Lite: A Share-a-Thon

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
UIC Teacher Fellows Info
Informational Flyer on Teacher Fellows program to develop classroom learning companion robots

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Engage in a variety of activities, collect information and resources, and network with middle level leaders. Discover new ideas and materials that you can use next week.

TAKEAWAYS:
The participants will network with other middle level science educators and leaders to discover and engage in activities that will expand their knowledge and be usable in all aspects of their work.

SPEAKERS:
Mary Lou Lipscomb (National Middle Level Science Teachers Association: Naperville, IL), Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Carey Dieleman (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ), Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA), Suzanne Cunningham (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN), Katy Garvey (The Source for Learning, Inc.: Reston, VA), Nicole Green (Animalearn: Jenkintown, PA), Joseph Michaelis (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Kim Nagle (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Anne Farley Schoeffler (Seton Catholic School: Hudson, OH), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Corydon Strawser (Lake Nona Middle School: Orlando, FL), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA), Barbara Phillips-Bredlow (Northeast Nodaway School District: Ravenwood, MO), Dawn Konieczny (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Erin Towns (Edward Little High School: Auburn, ME)

Science in Action: Updating the Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project Educators’ Guide

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W181a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Guide to NOAAs MDMAP for Educators (DRAFT ONLY)
Presentation Slides

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

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Marine debris is a widespread pollution problem in our ocean and waterways. It can harm wildlife, habitats, and our economy. This issue is human-caused, but it also has human solutions. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Debris Program is dedicated to better understanding and preventing marine debris and its impacts on our environment. One of the best tools we have to combat marine debris is understanding the distribution, abundance, and types of debris in the marine environment. The Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project (MDMAP) is a NOAA citizen science initiative to survey and record marine debris on shorelines. By participating in the MDMAP, students can generate critical data on marine debris for use by community organizations, policymakers, researchers, and NOAA. MDMAP data can also support student-generated action projects, providing opportunities to plan and implement authentic changemaking efforts. The NOAA Marine Debris Program plans to demonstrate and solicit feedback on an updated tool to support implementation of the MDMAP protocols with students: The MDMAP Educators’ Guide (Guide). We will introduce the updated protocols, provide a demonstration of activities in the Guide, and engage in a discussion with educators about implementation, suggested extensions (including action projects), and feedback.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees at this session will learn about the updated Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project Educators’ Guide: a refreshed citizen science tool for monitoring shoreline marine debris available from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, including planning and conducting protocols with students, working with survey data, and creating authentic, meaningful action projects for students based on their experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Alexandria Brake (NOAA Office of Education: Silver Spring, MD), Tanya Kea-Marie Torres (California Sea Grant Marine Debris Extension Fellow: , CA)

Integrating Makerspace for an Inclusive Classroom

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W179b


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

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It is often thought that a makerspace activity is something that is nice to do with students but not a necessity. Yet when makerspace activities are integrated into daily instruction, it can open many avenues that promote an inclusive classroom. This workshop will focus on strategies and ways to use makerspace to promote student voice and choice for areas of concept development, empathy-driven problem solving, and assessment. Participants will explore the key elements of makerspace and examine ways to use makerspace challenges to support sense-making. The discussion will also focus on the idea that makerspace activities can nudge all students to consider multiple ways of solving problems, thus enhancing their “out of the box” thinking. As part of this session, participants will explore different strategies in using makerspace to introduce a phenomenon, model a phenomenon, and assess students understanding on different dimensions of learning: Crosscutting Concepts, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Science and Engineering Practices.

TAKEAWAYS:
Makerspace challenges provide student choice and voice in how they make sense of a phenomenon, a solution to a problems, and core ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Michele Detwiler (Gary Adult High School: Tampa, FL)

Inspiring Curiosity and Writing with NSTA Kids Books, K–5

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Learn how NSTA Kids books such as the Next Time You See series can connect students with nature and inspire them to write their own books about natural objects and phenomena.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how literacy and science can be connected through writing activities and receive classroom-ready resources (videos and graphic organizers) to guide your students through a Mentor Text Study.

SPEAKERS:
Kim Stilwell (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Using Google Sites for Student Learning Journals

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W187a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Leah LaCrosse NSTA Bulb Page
This page will give access to presentations in pdf form.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

In this session, the presenter will showcase previously created student learning journals that were built with Google sites. Participants and presenter will brainstorm the possible categories and connections that are possible in student learning journals. Finally, attendees will be walked through a building process in which they create a sample student learning journal in google sites. Various tools in Google sites will be highlighted as well as ways to publish, share, and assess student learning growth.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will leave this session with an understanding of how to set up and implement student learning journals using Google sites.

SPEAKERS:
Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH)

NGSS-Aligned Assessments for Formative Use in the Elementary Classroom

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W181b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Elem Assessments for Formative Use.pdf
Handout Packet.pdf

STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

This session will provide an introduction to the freely available Next Generation Science Assessment (NGSA) Elementary (Grades 3-5) task portal (https://ngss-assessment.portal.concord.org/elementary-school) and the companion virtual learning community (VLC), Understanding Progress in Science (https://www.upinscience.org/). The NGSA Elementary tasks are multidimensional and aligned with NGSS performance expectations. They were co-developed with teachers and can work with any curriculum. The Understanding Progress in Science VLC provides additional resources, support, and community of practice dedicated to using assessment tasks formatively in elementary science. Participants can learn more about why and how to use NGSA Elementary tasks, get help understanding student responses and using rubrics, and discuss how to use student responses to guide instruction. During this Bring Your Own Device hands-on workshop, we will share examples of how teachers have used the tasks, sample student responses, and instructional next steps. Then we will guide attendees as they explore the NGSA Elementary tasks and consider how to integrate them into their teaching. Participants will also have the opportunity to explore the resources within the Understanding Progress in Science VLC that can support the formative use of tasks in their classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to access and use two related, freely available online resources that support elementary teachers’ use of NGSS-aligned assessment and instruction: A website with tasks aligned with the performance expectations for Grades 3-5 and a virtual learning community around using assessments formatively in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Liz Lehman (American Medical Association: Chicago, IL), Brian Gane (University of Kansas: No City, No State), Sania Zaidi (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL)

Beyond the Chocolates! Using grants to fund your classroom projects.

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Beyond the Chocolates
Grant writing for educators.
Beyond the Chocolates- Grant Writing for Educators
Beyond the Chocolates- Grant Writing for Educators

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The objective of this workshop is to guide educators through a mock grant-writing process. We will begin the session by discussing the grant process from proposal requests to awards. We will discuss misconceptions such as tax-exempt status requirements, time constraints, deliverables, project impact, collaboration, and more. Participants will have the opportunity to go through the process by searching for grants and completing a mock proposal. They will be provided with “step by step” guides to help them design a project, clarify their project objectives, create a budget, and determine the impact for their students, schools, and community. Participants will present their proposals and provide peer-to-peer feedback during the discussion part of the session.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to write a grant proposal for a classroom project.

SPEAKERS:
Emilia Odife (Lake Mary Preparatory School: Lake Mary, FL)

Digital Slides to Enhance In-Person Data Collection

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W180


STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

Throughout the pandemic teachers have learned how to successfully navigate their world in a virtual setting. Now the benefits of virtual teaching can be used to enhance in-person learning. This hands-on session gives participants the opportunity to use scientific tools such as a photometer, infrared thermometer, and watt meter to collect data. Digital interactive slides containing additional data will then be introduced to enhance the classroom experience. Digital interactive slides increase student engagement with clickable features providing meaningful data and useful information. Teachers will also be given instructions and resources to create their own interactive Google slides aligned to their curriculum. Though the focus of this session is data collection for high school physical science, digital interactive slides can be created for all grade levels and content. These activities are companions to the eesmarts K-12 curriculum, an energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy learning initiative funded by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund. Select digital resources will be provided to participants. The complete eesmarts program is free and available to all Connecticut educators.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will use tools such as a photometer, infrared thermometer, and watt meter to collect data, and enhance this experience with digital interactive slides providing additional data.

SPEAKERS:
Sharyon Holness (eesmarts: No City, No State), Rebecca Tonkinson (eesmarts: Hartford, CT), Karin Jakubowski (eesmarts: No City, No State)

Leveraging the Last Dimension: Crosscutting Concepts Across Grade Levels

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W184a


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

In this workshop, participants will engage in an activity demonstrating the power of the CCCs as a tool for guiding student thinking and teacher collaboration.

TAKEAWAYS:
The CCCs can be used as a tool to reach a desired learning objective while also vertically collaborating around the grade level–specific details they encompass.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Stults (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL), Chandra James (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL), Saswati Koya (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL)

Experience Before Explanation: Making STEM Lessons Accessible for All

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W185a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Come learn how you can make your STEM lessons more accessible for all students by making a few simple changes to your instructional sequence. During this session you will experience an engaging hands-on lesson that models what this structure can look like in a real classroom. We will also discuss the research behind allowing students to experience concepts before introducing students to new vocabulary terms and how this can give all students an entry point into learning STEM content.

TAKEAWAYS:
Sequence matters! When we allow students to experience concepts before we introduce scientific and academic vocabulary, we give all students an entry point into STEM content.

SPEAKERS:
Lee Jimenez (3rd Grade: , OH), Leslie Silbernagel (Northern Kentucky University: Highland Heights, KY)

Problem Centered Teaching by Tomorrow

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Presentation Link

STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Problem centered instruction is a great way to engage students, integrate content, inspire learning, and naturally incorporate all three dimensions of the NRC Framework. However, true problem centered instruction requires a major shift in both teaching and learning, requiring the one thing teachers don't have: time--the last thing teachers need is another pedagogical strategy that disrupts their entire routine. Teachers will have the opportunity to voice their concerns and discuss some barriers of problem centered teaching and learning, while also addressing the benefits for both teachers and students. Considering the benefits, there are some immediate changes that teachers can use to help shift to a problem centered environment. Recalling that problem centered learning should be complex, meaningful, and open-ended, the four strategies are: 1) Make the Content Relatable, 2) Structure: Less is More, 3) Be a Resource, Not an Answer Key, and 4) Use a Problem to Introduce a Topic. Teachers will then have an opportunity to put the strategies to immediate use by picking a lesson or topic and work with others to transform it into a three-dimensional, problem centered lesson.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will explore four strategies that promote three-dimensional learning through the process of problem centered instruction that is complex, meaningful, and open-ended. They will discuss benefits and barriers to the problem centered approach from the perspective of both the instructor and the learner. Teachers will have an opportunity to brainstorm and work collaboratively on transforming a lesson or topic of their choice into a problem centered, reality based scenario that seamlessly integrates the Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Cassandra Armstrong (Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy: Aurora, IL)

Phenomenal STEM: Finding Authentic Problems to Solve in the K–8 Classroom

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Are identifying and choosing relevant, authentic problems to put in front of your students holding you back from providing opportunities to engage your students in engineering design? In this workshop, gain insight into what makes a problem instructionally productive. We’ll also explore resources available to support you in selecting problems to put in front of your students and strategies to help students identify problems they want to pursue individually or in small groups for STEM competitions or their own interests.

TAKEAWAYS:
Explore authentic problems to solve in your STEM classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Asking the Students: Creating and Implementing a Metacognitive Data Tracker for Assessments

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W179a


STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Data meetings are as much of a reality to K–12 teachers and students as high-stakes testing. In this session we will share a data tool, as well as the surprising results we have collected so far, to help teachers in understanding students' struggles by asking the students directly what aspect of the assessment they struggled with the most. Our findings are serving students and teachers by improving Tier 1 instruction planning and delivery as well as leading to a much richer and in-depth conversation during data meetings.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will be given the knowledge and tools to implement our Metacognitive Data Tracker in order to improve Tier 1 instruction.

SPEAKERS:
Rocco Williams (Fort Worth ISD: Fort Worth, TX)

NASA Space Technology: Robotics and the International Space Station

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Learning Launchers: Robotics (https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/stem-on-station/learning_launchers_robotics) teacher toolkit part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help bring the International Space Station into the classroom. This session will focus on the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity that engages participants to build and test a robotic-like hand and understand how NASA uses robotic explorers to collect information about places where humans cannot travel. After watching videos "Robotics and the International Space Station" & "Benefits For Humanity: From Space to Surgery" participants will work in teams to construct a robotic-like hand and test their robotic hand by picking up an empty soda can or other lightweight objects. The “I Want to Hold Your Hand Activity” is aligned to national standards for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) (i.e., NGSS, ISTE). The focus of the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity ties Engineering Design and NGSS science and engineering practices of defining problems, developing models, and planning and carrying out investigations. This session connects participants to how NASA uses robots in many ways as well as benefit humanity with its robots’ doing science and experiments aboard the International Space Station.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Attendees will gain hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM engagement activity in their classroom using everyday materials that encourages students to construct a robotic-like hand and demonstrate how data are collected when using robotic technology. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how humans and robots are working hand in hand to expand the horizons of space exploration and how robotic research that has helped make advances in medicine, auto manufacturing, among other things. Without robotics, major accomplishments like the building the International Space Station, repairing satellites in space, and exploring other worlds would not be possible.

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

Creating phenomena for YOUR students

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The use of natural phenomena and driving questions to motivate student learning are key in the NGSS. With so many different science phenomena being posted for use in the classroom it can be difficult to determine what makes a good phenomenon and if that phenomena would be appropriate in all educational settings. The focus of this hands-on workshop is to give science teachers the tools needed to find, evaluate and use phenomena and driving questions for Performance Expectations that are consistent with the culture of their classroom. We will first explore and evaluate different phenomena used to teach the NGSS from various sources (websites, kits, science texts). Then we will apply cognitive learning theory and practices to those same phenomena and evaluate them considering different classroom cultures. Finally, participants will choose and discourse about alternative phenomena which might be used given different classroom cultures. The ultimate goal is to help science teachers evaluate and choose phenomena and create driving questions which can drive excellent science pedagogy in THEIR classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Science phenomena and driving questions need to be tailored to the real-world of students in YOUR classroom

SPEAKERS:
Rob Keys (Cornerstone University: Grand Rapids, MI)

Transformative Science Education: Enrich Your Students’ Lives with Science

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W193a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Unfortunately, the Las Vegas slogan “What Happens Here Stays Here” applies all too well to science classrooms. Science learning that takes place in the classroom often stays in the classroom and fails to transform students’ perceiving and experiencing of the world. This gap between school learning and everyday experience is one of the key barriers to developing active scientific literacy. This workshop on the Teaching for Transformative Experiences in Science (TTES) model will help teachers address this problem by enacting transformative teaching. The TTES model is a research-based pedagogy for fostering transformative experiences; that is, experiences in which students use science content to enrich and expand their everyday lives. The workshop will train teachers in the application of three core design principles: (a) artistic selection and crafting of content, (b) experiential apprenticeship, and (c) doing and undergoing. The workshop will be conducted by one of the pioneers and lead researchers of transformative experience theory. It will include authentic classroom vignettes illustrating the design principles in action, application templates and guidelines, and exercises that will help participants master the design principles. The workshop is appropriate for science educators at all levels as the design principles are adaptable to all ages.

TAKEAWAYS:
Workshop participants will receive hands-on training in research-based strategies effective at fostering transformative experiences; that is, experiences in which students use their in-school learning to enrich and expand their everyday, out-of-school lives.

SPEAKERS:
Kevin Pugh (University of Northern Colorado: Greeley, CO)

People to Ponder: Using Science History in the NGSS Classroom

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W179a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
People to Ponder

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

This workshop highlights one way to incorporate science history on a routine basis in the science classroom. Participants will receive a brief overview of the neuroscience research that explains why storytelling is emerging as one of the most effective educational tools for students of all ages. They will also explore how telling stories from science history promotes understanding of science practices, supports strong student science identities, and leads to discussion about the human nature of science and the underlying ethical and cultural implications. The presenter will share about the development of People to Ponder, a series of science profiles that can be used throughout a school year. This is not one specific set of scientists but rather a strategy to consistently include science history in instruction. Participants will experience through a student lens what a typical People to Ponder lesson might involve. Once they’ve experienced the strategy, participants will have a chance to reflect on and discuss how they might structure something similar in their classrooms. Participants will be provided with resources and instructional scaffolds that can assist them in their planning. They will leave with at least one activity or lesson planned for implementation in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Explore a strategy for sharing science biographies that promotes student engagement and understanding of science topics while creating an inclusive and culturally responsive teaching environment.

SPEAKERS:
Anna Babarinde (Sonoma County Office of Education: Santa Rosa, CA)

Maker-Centered Learning in the Early Years

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W175c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Maker Centered Learning screen 072322.pptx
Resources for Maker Centered Learning in the Early Years.docx

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Research shows many benefits of a maker-centered learning environment, however many teachers do not consider their classroom “maker classrooms” In this hands-on workshop, participants will see many different categories of making in an early years class, which allows participants to begin to reframe their view of their own classes. Through hands-on activities, participants experience a range of maker-centered learning activities which showcases how these activities can be used to develop problem solving and sensemaking for students, with built in modifications support MLL and students with special rights. Literacy development and formative assessments are also continuous threads in maker-centered learning as students learn and use language in the making process. Through observation and discussion of maker-made artifacts, and the processes leading to these artifacts, teachers can assess student understanding Furthermore, with many maker-centered activities, family and community connections are strengthened as students observe their own community, ask questions, and involve others outside of school in their making activities. Conference activities will be limited to portable, lightweight materials, with discussions and examples of different materials in action

TAKEAWAYS:
1) Discover new making opportunities to support sensemaking in your class while developing student skills in communication, collaboration as well as identifying and solving problems 2) Identify ways of integrating maker centered opportunities in your class planning, with specific attention to the early years 3) Observe different ways of bringing family’s funds of knowledge into a maker centered classroom

SPEAKERS:
Anne Lowry (Aleph Academy: Reno, NV)

Artemis: NASA's Missions to the Moon & Mars

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W186c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Attendees will be provided with a high-level overview of NASA’s Artemis Missions to the Moon and Mars, Next Generation Science Standards, and gain insights on how Engineering Design fits within the NGSS. This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Next Gen STEM - Moon to Mars Educator Guide titled, "Landing Humans on the Moon" (https://www.nasa.gov/stem-ed-resources/landing-humans-on-the-moon.html) which is part of a series of standards-aligned educator guides designed to help students reach their potential to join the next-generation STEM workforce and learn about sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. The focus of the “Safe Landing on the Lunar Surface” activity engages participants to understand how a spacecraft’s engines can provide downward thrust to counteract the force of gravity not only at launch, but also during a landing to slow its descent. Utilizing the engineering design process attendees will use household materials to better understand the difficulties in landing a lander on the surface of a terrestrial body that does not have an atmosphere (no atmospheric braking, no use of parachutes, and no aerodynamic control surfaces). Participants will design, build, and improve a model of a lunar lander that can slow its descent using the downward thrust of a balloon; graph the speed with respect to elevation of a model lunar lander.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendee will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom to help students learn about sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. 2. Attendees will gain hand on minds on experience with implementing NASA STEM engagement activities in their classroom. Then, using engineering design principles, attendees will mirror the process that NASA engineers follow to brainstorm a human lander design, ultimately building an actual model that they will test. 3. Participants will gain insights into the difficulties in landing a lander on the surface of a terrestrial body that does not have an atmosphere (no atmospheric braking, no use of parachutes, and no aerodynamic control surfaces).

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

DIY Digital Interactive Notebooking

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/16a_AiBztWiON2awmsWMd0b2t9v38sgubMxBB_OVxHRI/edit?usp=sharing

STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

Are you used to having your students keep a notebook, but aren’t sure how to transition it into a digital version? Have you ever wanted to try an Interactive Notebook but don’t know where to start? Are you having trouble keeping your students organized in the digital school world? Interactive Notebooks are a meaningful way to transfer a student’s learning, practice, and reflection into an engaging digital environment. Research has shown that benefits range from allowing students space to record and reflect on their experiences, guiding teacher instruction, and providing more opportunities for differentiation. As classes have shifted between in-person, hybrid, and completely online instruction, digital learning options are becoming an even more necessary part of our curriculum. During this workshop, you will learn about different types of digital notebooks, their uses/benefits, and how to find or create your own resources for student use. By converting an interactive notebook into a digital notebook, students can now access multi-media resources all in one place creating opportunities for greater flexibility and autonomy in learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Create and manage digital notebooks resources from materials you already use.

SPEAKERS:
Joy Barnes-Johnson (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Mridula Bajaj (Mount Laurel Schools: Mount Laurel, NJ), Shefali Mehta (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ)

Using CERs and CEJs to Develop Student Discourse and Discussion

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Come learn how to teach in three dimensions and advance students’ scientific literacy by strategically applying the use of CERs and CEJs in your classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
After this session, participants will be able to identify opportunities for using CERs and CEJs to facilitate student discourse and discussion and apply what they have learned to their own classroom.

SPEAKERS:
McKenna Serowka (Lake Zurich High School: Lake Zurich, IL)

Welcome to Hogwarts: STEM-ing with Harry Potter

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W178b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Email addresses.PNG
STEMming with Harry Potter.pdf

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Enter a magical world with your students where everyone becomes enchanted with STEM. This budget-friendly lesson can engage and excite your students! Cross-curricular materials provided!

TAKEAWAYS:
1. The cross-curricular unit uses common cost-effective materials, as well as STEM topics, to promote learning for all students in the classroom; 2. there are a variety of assessment tools for different student ability levels, including participation assessments, written assessments, and verbal assessments; and 3. this "station-based" lesson will keep students moving through the STEM topics, captivated by the activities, learning without knowing it is happening.

SPEAKERS:
Elesha Goodfriend (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN), Kelly Moore-Roberts (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN)

NESTA and SSSA: Know Soil, Know Life—Dig into the Connections!

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

More than just dirt, soil is vital to life on the planet. Join us as we explore the how’s and why’s of the soil-life connection.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn the fundamental linkages between soils and life while being immersed in numerous activities and demonstrations that support classroom integration of soil topics.

SPEAKERS:
Clay Robinson (CRC Consulting: No City, No State), Susan Chapman (Soil Science Society of America: Madison, WI)

Facilitating Inquiry for Growth in Science and Engineering Practices: Exploring Surface Heating

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W178a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Exploring Surface Heating.pdf
UHI Observations.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Learning through place-based, student-centered, teacher-facilitated STEM inquiry increases student engagement in and ownership of learning and promotes student growth in science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and crosscutting concepts. Using a unit plan I developed for exploring local microclimates, participants will engage in activities and discussion of techniques for cultivating students as collaborators in the learning process. The unit is designed to encourage growth in asking questions, designing and conducting investigations, collecting data, making sense of data, communicating findings, and identifying local problems and designing solutions to a student-identified problem. Participants will use NASA infrared images of surface temperatures captured during an ISS mission to observe the urban heat island phenomenon. They will explore Google Earth to spark questions about surface heating that can be answered through investigation of the local neighborhood or school campus. Given a list of equipment that students used during the unit, participants will collaboratively design an investigation to collect place-based data. Discussion includes extension activities that facilitate student understanding of surface heating and cooling. Discussion also includes how revision and reflection can be used to monitor individual student growth and promote ownership of learning by students. Emphasis is on facilitation techniques.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learning through place-based, student-centered, teacher-facilitated STEM inquiry increases student engagement in and ownership of learning and promotes student growth in science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and crosscutting concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ)

NASA STEM: Computational Thinking: Crew Transportation with Orion

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The free NASA STEM lesson plans introduce the practice of computational thinking and include elements of a real NASA mission. NASA’s Artemis program will return humans to the lunar surface for the first time since 1972, the year of the agency's last Apollo moon landing. This Educator Guide provides four standards-aligned activities to help students learn about NASA's Orion spacecraft that will take astronauts to the Moon and beyond. In this session, we will design and build a crew module model that will secure two 2-cm astronaut figures during a drop test. The PowerPoint will be available to all participants. The PowerPoint will include the videos and activities including the tips and pointers. Session Outline: 5 min - Welcome and Introduction to NASA Artemis Mission 10 min- STEM Engagement strategies and culturally relevant teaching 10 min- Introducing the Engineering Design Challenge 20 min- Teams Design a Crew Vehicle 10 min- Testing the Crew Vehicle 5 min- Reviewing the Resources and Q and A https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/np-2020-02-2805-hq.pdf

TAKEAWAYS:
NASA provides free educational resources that include educator guides with standards-aligned activities to help students use computational thinking while including elements of real NASA missions.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Kohler (NASA Glenn Research Center: Cleveland, OH)

Supporting Early Elementary Students in Asking Questions with Driving Question Boards

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W187b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
DQB handout PDF.pdf
DQB handout for early elementary
Early Elementary DQB (1).pdf
presentation slides

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Wondering how to inspire students’ curiosity and interest in science? Driving Question Boards (DQB) allow you to build science instruction around your students’ own ideas and questions. As students experience phenomena and ask their own questions, science becomes accessible to all students. Students gain similar experiences with phenomena allowing for inclusive classroom discourse opportunities because lack of experience is not an inhibitor. The students’ wonderings then drive the learning process as students engage in sensemaking around driving questions like, “How can we tell a story without using words?” or “How can we change the way that our toys move?” In this session, participants will experience phenomena, construct a DQB and experience other equitable project-based science strategies, designed for early elementary students, that they can take back to their own classroom. Participants will hear stories from real classrooms and access OER research-based curriculum.

TAKEAWAYS:
Engage in constructing a Driving Question Board (DQB) and other learning experiences designed for early elementary students and reflect on strategies used to support students' figuring out process as they experience and explain phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Amber Richmond (Detroit Public Schools Community District: Detroit, MI), Cory Miller (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI), Chiara Kirkland (Detroit Public Schools Community District: No City, No State)

Designing Escape Boxes

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

NASA's Newest X-plane: "X-57 -- It's Electrifying!"

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W193a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Did you know that every U.S. aircraft flying today, and every U.S. air traffic control facility, uses NASA-developed technology in some way? Participants in this session will gain insights into how NASA Aeronautics work to make aviation truly sustainable by reducing delays and environmental impacts, transforming aviation efficiency and safety, while reducing noise, fuel use, harmful emissions, and ultimately transform the way we fly. NASA’s X-57 Maxwell is an experimental aircraft designed to test operating multiple electric motors for use in turning propellers – an idea known as “distributed electric propulsion.” This session highlights an activity from NASA’s “X-57 Electric Airplane: STEM Learning Module” (https://www.nasa.gov/aeroresearch/stem/X57 ) part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help students learn about NASA’s X-57 Maxwell and the science behind electric propulsion. This session will focus on the “X-57 Maxwell: Circuits Activity Guide” that engages participants to build a light-up paper helicopter by creating a “parallel circuit” that uses copper foil tape, two LED lights, and a battery. This session’s goals are to demonstrate that an all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly. Session participants will understand that knowledge gained from the X-57 Maxwell research will help engineers design future electric-powered aircraft for everything from urban air mobility to moving passengers and cargo between nearby cities.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM activity in their classroom that encourages students to create a parallel circuit on a paper helicopter as an introduction to circuitry and propulsion. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how NASA’s X-57 Maxwell all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly while gaining a better understanding of the STEM concepts of energy transfer, and the physical science of pressure and aerodynamics.

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)