2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:Presentation, General Science

 

98 results

Lunch: Elements of Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Wednesday, July 20 • 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Regency Ballroom


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

By Invitation Only

Shifting from traditional professional development to curriculum-based professional learning is a simple concept but complex to design and execute well. At its core, it means teachers experience the same kind of inquiry-based learning we expect them to provide their students. Learn more about a Carnegie Corporation of New York report, The Elements, which identifies a core set of research-based actions, approaches, and enabling conditions that effective schools and systems have put in place to reinforce and amplify the power of high-quality curriculum and skillful teaching.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Examine beliefs and assumptions regarding the relationship between high-quality instructional materials, curriculum-based professional learning and student success 2. Gain understanding of the foundation for The Elements, a challenge paper from Carnegie Corporation of New York 3. Learn from science practitioners whose successful curriculum implementation efforts are grounded in the elements and essentials.

SPEAKERS:
Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

NSTA First-Timers Orientation Session

Thursday, July 21 • 7:30 AM - 8:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


Show Details

Feeling overwhelmed by all there is to see and do at an NSTA conference on science education? Join us for an interactive exploration through the conference app and NSTA’s social media. By the end of the session, you will know just how to get the most from your conference experience in addition to building new networks with your science colleagues.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Allan (University of Central Oklahoma: Edmond, OK)

Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a Brand New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Since its release, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the NGSS has become an essential tool for many educators across the country. A new version titled the Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimension has been developed to not only support teachers in all states that have standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education. This new version of the Quick-Reference Guide still contains the most useful features of the original, including descriptions of the practices and the crosscutting concepts from the Framework of K-12 Science Education and K-12 progressions of the elements of all three dimensions. In addition, the new Quick-Reference Guide contains several new features that should make it even more helpful. For example, every element now has a unique code (based on the codes in the NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions) that makes it much easier to reference a particular element. In addition, there is an entire chapter devoted to the Performance Expectations. Finally, the guide also contains a number of tools for working with standards. This session will outline all of the features of the guide through the process of unpacking the crosscutting concepts to better understand how to make curriculum, instruction, and assessment more three-dimensional.

TAKEAWAYS:
A deeper understanding of the Crosscutting Concepts and how a well-designed reference guide can make it easier to unpack the three dimensions for work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Everything You Always Wanted to Know about NGSS, But Were Afraid to Ask

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W175a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Everything you always wanted to know about NGSS_Handout.pdf
Everything you always wanted to know about NGSS_Presentation.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The NGSS is very complicated. The Institute for Quality Science Teaching at the Museum of Science and Industry provides professional learning opportunities for science teachers in Chicagoland and surrounding areas. Our approach is to ground everything we do in the NGSS and take a deep dive into all the elements of 3-dimensional learning. Professional learning programs at MSI are invested in helping teachers understand how to teach science effectively to meet these standards. Teachers in our programs learn science content in the context of 3-dimensional lessons, as instructors demonstrate instructional practices that enable NGSS-aligned teaching and learning. This presentation will review the basics of the NGSS, the 3 dimensions, how they’re combined in Performance Expectations, and the basics of enacting the NGSS in the classroom. If you need a refresher, just want a review, or still don’t have all those acronyms straight in your head, this is the presentation for you.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will leave with a basic understanding of the structures of the Next Generation Science Standards and how they inform 3-dimensional standards and 3-dimensional science teaching.

SPEAKERS:
Lauren Slanker (Museum of Science and Industry: Chicago, IL), Karin Klein (Museum of Science and Industry: Chicago, IL)

Exploring a General-Education Science Class Designed to Teach Skills, Not Facts

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W186a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Teach Skills Not Facts Handout
Teach Skills, Not Facts Article

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

General-education science classes are often the last chance we have to empower students with the science literacy skills necessary to navigate today’s world. But what is science literacy? Memorizing facts and following recipe-like labs? Or is it understanding how the process of science learns about the world by testing explanations and critically scrutinizing the evidence? A good science education teaches students how, not what, to think. Science isn’t just what we know; it’s how we know. This presentation explores a novel course developed using a backward design approach designed to teach the essential skills of critical thinking, information literacy, and science literacy. By focusing on the process of science over content, students learn how to evaluate the evidence for claims to determine how we know something. Directly including pseudoscience (e.g. astrology, psychics, homeopathy, Bigfoot) and science denial (e.g. climate change, evolution, GMOs) increases engagement, addresses common misconceptions, and teaches students how to recognize the characteristics of good science. Assignments and activities in which students actively create misinformation inoculates them against the real thing. Finally, providing students with a structured toolkit to evaluate claims (with lots of opportunities to practice) helps students apply what they’re learning to the “real world.”

TAKEAWAYS:
The goal of general education science should not be memorizing facts, but learning the essential skills of critical thinking, information literacy, and science literacy.

SPEAKERS:
Melanie Trecek-King (Massasoit Community College: , 0)

The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

One of the key features of the NGSS and other standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education is the idea that a “a progression of knowledge occurs from grade band to grade band that gives students the opportunity to learn more complex material, leading to an overall understanding of science by the end of high school.” (NGSS Appendix A, p. 2) The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions has a set of 62 maps that illustrate the how the elements of the three dimensions build on each other and connect to one another. Each map focuses on a particular topic and shows the progression students are expected to make in that topic from one grade-span to the next. Arrows connecting individual elements on a map indicate that competency in one element is useful in learning to achieve the other element. Educators can use maps to deepen their understanding of the standards to plan or improve curriculum, instruction, and assessment. This session will provide participants guidance on how to read the maps in the Atlas and use this powerful tool to deepen their understanding of elements of the standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
A careful review of the connections between elements of the three dimensions can provide a clearer understanding of science standards and important guidance in planning instructional sequences to support three-dimensional teaching and learning.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Partnering with NSTA to Reach Your Professional Learning Goals

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Slides Partnering with NSTA to Reach Your Professional Learning Goals

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

NSTA Partnerships provide personalized professional learning experiences for groups of K–12 educators. Find out more about this NSTA opportunity that combines membership with access to resources, online tools, and the national network.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will discover the value of becoming a Partner with NSTA for groups of educators.

SPEAKERS:
Flavio Mendez (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Global Conversations: International Film Festival

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W186c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session will showcase lessons from around the world focusing on the exchange of ideas and networking. Come view a film created using videos from teachers around the globe, and posters while engaging with other teachers looking to network internationally.

TAKEAWAYS:
This session will showcase lessons from around the world focusing on the exchange of ideas and networking. Come view a film created using videos from teachers around the globe, and posters while engaging with other teachers looking to network internationally.

SPEAKERS:
Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

The STEM of PBL

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
_Main_Course.pdf
http://bit.ly/STEMPBLQA
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1c38TeuqPSC-vS8GLiVXQH9GzI7g0sjbx/view?usp=sharing
STEM PBL in action
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HyFVEpZyEY
STEM PBL in action
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
Guiding questions
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
The Engineering Design Process/Journal Reflections
Projects VS PBL.docx
What Is PBL_ARTICLE.pdf
Why Is PBL Important_ARTICLE.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Participants will understand how to develop and effectively implement STEM curriculum units that include project based activities and performance based assessments. Participants will learn to help students answer complex questions and develop solutions for challenges and real-world problems. They will also assist students with extending and refining their acquired knowledge to routinely analyze and solve problems. By the end of this session: 1) Participants will gain a clear and coherent understanding of what a STEM PBL is and how it works. 2) Participants will be able to identify and create effective essential questions. 3) Participants will be able to identify and apply the components of a STEM PBL. 4) Understand how STEM PBL’s will impact instruction for participants and students. Agenda: What is PBL? Why is it important? How does a STEM PBL Work? How to effectively integrate journal reflections. Ways to Implement STEM PBL’s

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to effectively implement STEM PBL’s (Project Based Learning) by integrating the components of STEM and PBL in order to grow students' capacity for creativity, fun, and back-loaded learning in a STEM context.

SPEAKERS:
Adero Carter (Clayton County Public Schools: Jonesboro, GA)

Creating and Sustaining Innovative Learning Spaces: Grants 101

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W193b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Need FREE grant funds for STEAM education, but don't know where to start? This session unpacks how to engineer a grant proposal in 12 steps.

TAKEAWAYS:
From this session, educators will be able to: 1. describe grant types and grant funders; 2. illustrate the 12-step grant writing process; and 3. identify sources of grant funding.

SPEAKERS:
Bejanae Kareem (STEM & Grant Specialist: Jonesboro, GA)

Creating Digital Works with iPad in the Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W186b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Leah LaCrosse NSTA Bulb Page
This page will give access to presentations in pdf and original files.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

From cartoon strips to mini documentaries, students can create digital works that show their science understanding. Having an all in one tool like the iPad allows students to show growth in their understanding with exciting, creative projects. Capturing videos, sounds and photos begins the student journey in learning. This session will begin with the why and move into the how. Sharing free apps for creation, the presenter will demonstrate the power of student creation. We will also highlight the various ways to assess and publish these student projects.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will leave this session with ready to go ideas for digital creation using iPad in the science classroom. Student samples from an 8th grade science classroom will be shared.

SPEAKERS:
Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH)

Data and Storylines: The key to helping all students become STEM literate

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Data and Storylines
Resources for Teachers
Resource Folder
Resource Folder

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

News bulletins on social media and news sites contain topics that students need to understand now so that they can make informed decisions for their world today and tomorrow. STEM literacy is crucial to learners struggling to understand the multitude of information bombarding them through television, social media and the internet. Students in K-12 must become STEM literate so that they can identify, understand and solve problems in the world around them. STEM Literacy promotes innovative thinking and creativity as well as collaboration, problem solving, and most importantly, critical thinking. Today’s challenges need answers from our students but first they need to understand issues including climate change, space travel, robotics. By using real-world applications of scientific data and storylines, students become critical consumers, problem-solvers, and change-makers. Students who are STEM literate will be able to think critically and act responsibly about issues that impact them. In this session, lessons and strategies will be shared with teachers to inspire and to support their students as they develop STEM literacy skills. These lessons will encourage students to explore, explain and develop solutions to real phenomena and solve real problems.

TAKEAWAYS:
Three Takeaways: 1) Teachers will become familiar with technology, literacy and adaptive learning for middle school and high school students. 2) Teachers will be introduced to the free materials available that align with NGSS standards. 3) Teachers will be given ideas on how to incorporate these lessons in class

SPEAKERS:
Diane Ripollone (Cardinal Gibbons High School: Raleigh, NC), Kathy Biernat (Educational Consultant: Franklin, WI)

Instructional Coaching in Elementary Science

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W187b


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

In this session we will explore the experience of an instructional coach working with a fifth-grade teacher to engage students in three-dimensional learning using an NGSS curriculum at an urban school.

TAKEAWAYS:
This session will explore how instructional coaches can be leveraged in elementary schools to support teachers and students in implementing the NGSS.

SPEAKERS:
Alayla Ende (University at Buffalo, SUNY: Buffalo, NY)

Strategies to Improve Communications in Inclusive Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W181c


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Improve inclusive classroom dynamics between teachers, families, and students by reflecting on disability model perspectives, identifying barriers to collaboration, and determining effective avenues of communication.

TAKEAWAYS:
The triangle of inclusion presents pathways that can be used by administrators and teachers to recognize and overcome barriers faced within the inclusive classroom and includes strategies such as early open communications, student advocacy, professional learning opportunities, and mentorships.

SPEAKERS:
Nicole Wack (East Penn School District: Emmaus, PA)

Digital Choose-Your-Own Science Adventure

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W185a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Participants experience three different digital design challenges using branching scenarios that provide student choice and data sets involving wind energy, electromagnetism, and the greenhouse effect.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will engage in three digital design challenges to test the efficiency of wind turbine blades, the strength of electromagnets, and the greenhouse effect on different land surfaces (polar region, water, and desert).

SPEAKERS:
Rebecca Tonkinson (eesmarts: Hartford, CT), Sharyon Holness (eesmarts: No City, No State), Kathleen Brooks (eesmarts: , 0)

La Ciencia Del Folklore: Connecting Latino Legends to Elementary Science

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W179b


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

We will model activities that link Latino folktales to science and ELA learning as a means to connect natural phenomena and culture.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will walk away with Latin American folktales that connect to science phenomena for quick implementation in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Ivan Ochoa Martinez (Irene C. Hernandez Middle School for the Advancement of Science: Chicago, IL), Julio Mendez (Friedrich W. Von Steuben Metropolitan Science Center: Chicago, IL), Madison Delaney (Teacher: , IL)

Preparing for the 2023 Annular and 2024 Total Solar Eclipses

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Learn about the many resources available to help plan your viewing of the 2023 annular and 2024 total solar eclipses.

TAKEAWAYS:
In order to see the maximum coverage of the Sun in a solar eclipse, the most important detail is a clear sky and fewer clouds. According to current climate data, the best locations to observe each solar eclipse will be reviewed.

SPEAKERS:
Richard Thomas (Beacon High School: Naples, FL)

Executive Function Supports for Creating Inclusive Science Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W179a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
EF Supports for Inclusive Science Classrooms Presentation PDF
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1TUPMxotRYq0ZsboPp7i1jxMVKthb0vnv?usp=sharing
NSTA Presentation 7_21 (1).pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Come learn about simple, applicable strategies to support your students' executive function skills in the science classroom, with an emphasis on project planning, organization, flexible thinking, and time management.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will identify the educational impact of the 11 main executive functions, as well as learn concrete strategies for supporting their students in both general and special education settings.

SPEAKERS:
Krista Northcutt (New Way Academy: Phoenix, AZ)

Inclusive Grading of 3-D Science

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

How can grading better represent students’ 3-D learning? This workshop will take a specific focus on grading phenomenon-driven curricula that do not have typical worksheets.

TAKEAWAYS:
Standards-based grading and careful selection of student work aligned to lesson-level PEs for feedback can help make 3-D learning more meaningful for students.

SPEAKERS:
Kerri Wingert (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Using Formative Assessment and Small Group Instruction in the Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W187c


STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Small group instruction belongs in science too! Learn how to create and use formative assessments to support differentiated small group instruction.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to support all students through differentiated small group instruction.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Luthi (Gwinnett County Public Schools: Suwanee, GA)

Dude Perfect Physics…or Using Student Interests as a Conduit to Learning

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

It’s important to keep your finger on the pulse of what students are interested in beyond the walls of the classroom. By keeping up with pop culture and current events you gain a window to the world that a child sees. The trick is to capture that interest and use it to communicate academic content through a lens that stays with them. In this session we’ll see some effective tools that keep the message fresh and effective.

TAKEAWAYS:
Using pop culture interests can be more fun and engaging than putting a character on a worksheet.

SPEAKERS:
John Hawkins (Oak Hill School: Nashville, TN)

Teaching Critical-Thinking Skills to Reluctant Teenagers

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W181b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Teaching Critical Thinking skills to reluctant teenagers.pptx

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Learn how to overcome the apathy of teenagers, understand their motivations for not asking questions, and get them to be curious again!

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will take away multiple strategies to implement in their classroom to spark the curiosity of teens they teach.

SPEAKERS:
Jamye Carr (Cedar Ridge High School: Hillsborough, NC)

Join Us for the Elementary STEM Showcase!

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W183a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Exploring Energy Transfer in Ecosystems with SageModeler
Mars Mission Specialist.pdf
Mindfulness Jar recipe
Touch-Talk-Text Practices that support reading and science instruction

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Wander your way through 30 different STEM stations to learn about resources, lessons, and teaching strategies to incorporate more STEM into your school and classroom. This farmer's market–type event brings together educators, authors, researchers, and leaders in early childhood through fifth-grade STEM education. Leave with a mindful of great ideas and be inspired!

TAKEAWAYS:
Pick up great ideas and be inspired during this farmer's market–type event.

SPEAKERS:
Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Heather Pacheco-Guffrey (Bridgewater State University: Bridgewater, MA), Lauren Burrow (Stephen F. Austin State University: Nacogdoches, TX), Susan Erickson (Country School: Weston, MA), Sara Nelson (Iowa State University: Ames, IA), Constance Beecher (Iowa State University: Ames, IA), Elizabeth Dethloff (Robert R. Shaw Center for STEAM: Katy, TX), Christine Preston (The University of Sydney: Sydney, Australia), Catherine Scott (Coastal Carolina University: Conway, SC), Kristin Cook (Bellarmine University: Louisville, KY), Richard Cox, Jr. (Winthrop University: Rock Hill, SC), Annette Venegas (Kent School District: Kent, WA), Juliette Guarino Berg (The Town School: New York, NY), Katie Morrison (University Child Development School: Seattle, WA), Wendi Laurence (Create-osity: Park City, UT), Katrina Kmak (Park City Library: Park City, UT), Brittnie Hecht (Park City Library: Park City, UT), Diana Lockwood (Author & Executive Director: , 0), Godwyn Morris (Dazzling Discoveries / Skill Mill NYC: New York, NY), Bridget Miller (University of South Carolina: Columbia, SC), Christie Martin (University of South Carolina: Columbia, SC), Rebecca Kurson (Collegiate School: New York, NY), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Shelly Counsell (The University of Memphis: Memphis, TN), Belle Akers (Convent & Stuart Hall's Schools of the Sacred Heart: San Francisco, CA), Kathleen Tate (American Public University System: Charles Town, WV), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS), Bill Burton (The Lamplighter School: Dallas, TX), Barbara Bromley (Hazelwood Elementary School: Lynnwood, WA), Kim Stilwell (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Nancy McIntyre (Robotics Education & Competition Foundation: Greenville, TX), Shari Haug (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL), Jane Savatski (Janet Berry Elementary School: Appleton, WI), Katrina Pavlik (Deputy Executive Director: Oakbrook Terrace, IL), Mitchell Rosenberg (Kinderlab Robotics, Inc.: Waltham, MA), Tiffany Leones (Digital Promise: Washington, DC), Beth Dykstra VanMeeteren (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA), Danielle Scharen (North Carolina State University: Raleigh, NC), Frances Hamilton (The University of Alabama in Huntsville: Huntsville, AL), Jennifer Williams (Isidore Newman School: New Orleans, LA), Anne Lowry (Aleph Academy: Reno, NV)

Informal Science Share-a-Thon

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 3:40 PM

McCormick Place - W183c


Show Details

Informal science can be found every day in the world around us. Visit exhibitors at the Share-a-thon to learn about many of those incredible examples.

SPEAKERS:
Brian Kutsch (National Science Teaching Association, eCYBERMISSION: No City, No State)

Scaffolding Students’ Progression Through CCCs and SEPs Using Resources from the OpenSciEd Toolkit

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W186c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
https://www.openscied.org/teacher-resources/
NSTA 2022 Chicago - SEP and CCC Toolkit Slides.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

See how tools developed within OpenSciEd units can support students’ progression of and engagement in SEPs and CCCs across a variety of unit contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with practical tools such as graphic organizers, general rubrics, and self- and peer-assessments that can be used to support students in incrementally building SEPs and CCCs in a variety of units.

SPEAKERS:
Dawn Novak (Science Educator: Grayslake, IL), Gail Housman (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Jamie Deutch Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Formative Assessment and Developing Critical Thinking Skills

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W187c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

This session is intended to discuss the importance of formative assessment as a tool for guiding students and helping all students to make progress. A variety of formative assessment tools will be explored. Most importantly, the use of individual feedback on formative assessments will be demonstrated and we will discuss how this leads to improved metacognition and critical thinking skills for students. Attendees will see sample student work on formative assessments and accompanying sample teacher feedback. They will practice making comments of there own, in addition to discussing logistical concerns with the practice of individualized feedback.

TAKEAWAYS:
This session is intended to discuss the importance of formative assessment as a tool for guiding students and helping all students to make progress.

SPEAKERS:
Jennifer Maguire (Virginia Tech: Blacksburg, VA)

Providing actionable feedback to build students’ self-reflection skills

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W181a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Actionable Feedback.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

How many teacher comments on student work are left unread? Or, even if they are read, how useful are they to the student? Can the student positively internalize the feedback and use it to improve their work? Chances are the answer is no! But it doesn’t have to be this way! During this session, participants will learn more effective strategies for giving actionable feedback and methods to help their students utilize feedback to improve their work. First we’ll learn how to ask questions in student feedback and how differently questions are internalized by the student. For example, consider the difference between, “I don’t understand what you mean here,” and “Can you explain in more detail what you meant in this statement?” Then we’ll discover how to make sure teachers' feedback is read and used by students to improve their work. By making self reflection a formalized step in the learning process, teachers provide students opportunities to practice this important skill! Participants will receive a worksheet with feedback tips and tricks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Several methods that can be applied immediately in the classroom, providing feedback encouraging students to be self reflective of their own work.

SPEAKERS:
Regina Borriello (Clifton High School: Edison, NJ)

A Model for Recruiting and Retaining Hispanic Students in STEM Fields

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W181b


Show Details

Hispanic students are a growing minority in school systems. However, the number of Hispanic students earning certificates and degrees in STEM fields at the post-secondary level is far below that of other students. To address this problem, Hispanic students and their families need to be introduced to STEM subjects (including hands-on activities) and STEM professionals (including professors and students majoring in STEM fields) beginning in elementary school. This communication and relationship building needs to continue in both middle school and high school. It then culminates with dual enrollment classes, mentorships, and internships at the community college level. In this presentation, you will be introduced to the RHiTA (recruiting Hispanics to achieve) program at Walters State Community College and the Hispanic STEM engagement pipeline. You will hear about the successes and the failures of this program and the plans for the future. You will be given tips and advice to create a similar program at your college.

TAKEAWAYS:
Develop and implement a pipeline from elementary school to community college in STEM subjects to engage Hispanic students.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Moore-Roberts (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN), Elesha Goodfriend (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN)

That doesn't look like a science fair!

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W179a


STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

This session is designed to help teachers deepen their understanding of the effective and practical strategies needed to facilitate a successful science fair competition or symposium in either a face-to-face or hybrid environment. Participants will be provided with a variety of instructional strategies and free curriculum materials to ensure that all students have access to a social learning platform that will encourage opportunities to collaborate with peers and mentors through intentional planning. The instructional strategies used in this presentation will promote student engagement, differentiation, and scientific understanding to help form a more inclusive learning environment within the classroom and within the district community.

TAKEAWAYS:
--Participants will experience a variety of impactful instructional strategies that promote authentic scientific research and presentation to promote access to equitable future opportunities for students regarding college and/or career endeavors

SPEAKERS:
Angela McMurry (The Ohio Academy of Science: Dublin, OH)

Incorporating the 3 Rs of Animal Use in High School Science Classes

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

A cross-disciplinary team of teachers, subject matter experts, and curriculum developers have designed resources and materials to facilitate teaching students about the use of animals in scientific research in the United States, as well as Russell and Burch’s 3 Rs principles of replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal use. The materials, which are aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, are geared toward high school science students. The modules can be taught separately or in combination, giving educators flexibility to choose specific content areas to share and explore with their students. During the session, we will present two learning plans: one that introduces students to the 3 Rs principles and how animals are used in scientific research, and another that covers the 3 Rs principles in more depth. We will share information, including teaching plans, learning materials, and performance assessment tasks associated with the curriculum, with session attendees.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will have an opportunity to learn more about the content and activities covered in two lesson plans focused on the use of animals in scientific research in the United States and the 3 Rs principles. Sample lesson plans and associated learning materials, including presentations, articles, and worksheets, will be shared with attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Pam Osenkowski (National Anti-Vivisection Society: Chicago, IL)

Energizing Students for Greater Energy Savings

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W175c


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Energy is the second largest expenditure in American schools. Managing energy use in a school setting is difficult without having students, faculty, and staff engaged and actively participating in a management program. This presentation will serve as the steppingstone for how to conduct one’s own educational energy audit in their classroom and school building. The hands-on investigations turn the school building into a living laboratory to explore energy efficiency, monitor energy use, and decide on the best behavioral changes based on data collected. The lessons introduce students to the concepts of energy, energy consumption, economic and environmental effects of the energy industry and its consumers, and the difference between conservation and efficiency. Activities encourage the development of cooperative learning, math, science, comparison and contrast, public speaking, and critical thinking skills. By engaging students in an energy management program, you have hundreds of enthusiastic mini energy managers ready to help identify things like broken water fountains, leaky doors or windows, inappropriate lighting use, vampire loads, and unwanted temperature variations within their own building. Students take ownership of their school and take better care of it while leading their peers to be conscientious users of energy. They learn these skills to bring back to their home and community.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn hands-on activities that introduce students to the ways in which we use energy in the home and at school while helping teach students to take ownership and lead their peers to be conscientious users of energy.

SPEAKERS:
Cori Nelson (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA)

Making Group Work Fair: The Potential Pitfalls of Student Peer Evaluations

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Although group projects have been shown to increase learning and cooperation, bullying can sneak into student peer evaluations. Examples and alternatives to ghosting presented.

TAKEAWAYS:
Science classrooms are a great place for group projects to enhance learning, but students may unwittingly be ghosted from their group, ultimately making them seem like they are not a team player. We as teachers must be diligent against bullying/ghosting.

SPEAKERS:
Diane Huelskamp (Wright State University-Lake Campus: Celina, OH)

Lessons Learned: Strategies to Address Invisible Illnesses and Health-Impairment Disabilities in STEM Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W179a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Resources and strategies to support P–12 and postsecondary students in STEM classrooms who have invisible illnesses/ health-impairment disabilities will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will get an overview of resources and strategies that address the need for safe and equitable learning environments for P–12 and postsecondary students with invisible disabilities/ health-impairment illnesses in STEM classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Grim-Hunter (Chicago State University: Chicago, IL)

From Failure to a Science Distinction in Two Years

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W185d



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
From Failure to Success some suggested strategies

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Using STEM education to move a science department from failure to distinction in two academic years is possible. Artifacts used will be shared in addition to research-based strategies that were employed during the process, from failure to a science distinction. STEM education is vital for the success of all students. STEM instruction allows the teacher to make learning connected and more relevant. This presentation will be focused on a teacher’s standpoint and an administrator’s lens. Strategies used mainly focused on employing higher-order thinking skills for both students and teachers. As a Science Department, we were “In it to win”. Teacher standpoint. The foundation of instruction of the department was based on the inquiry approach method that involved ESL and Special education faculty support during all planning sessions. Well-structured PLCs were vital vertically and horizontally. From the lens of an administrator Setting high expectations for PLCs and department meeting is critical. The approach must always be “It’s not another department meeting”: Instructional mechanics were self-checked by using Swivl, and frequent casual ‘I Noticed’ walkthroughs improved instruction. BOY Goal setting for student performance must be strategically tied to all major assessments. Creating a culture of student-centered learning and instructional guidance for teachers is the cohesive force that paves the road to success.

TAKEAWAYS:
STEM education is vital for the success of all students. STEM instruction allows the teacher to make learning connected and more relevant. This presentation will be focused on a classroom teacher’s standpoint and from an administrator’s lens how the road to success can be paved strategically.

SPEAKERS:
Jean Langevine (Galveston ISD: Galveston, TX)

Science Education Leadership: Helping Administrators Build Knowledge and Skills to Support Quality Science Instruction

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W181c


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

This session will present attendees with an up-to-date literature review, as well as original research, regarding administrators knowledge and acceptance of evolution and evolution education law. After discussing the research, a virtual library of general resources will be shared with attendees that they bring back to their school and district administrators. Additionally, attendees will learn how to locate or create resources to add to this virtual library that are specific to their state standards, specific content areas, and local communities. The goal is that attendees will return to their schools and districts and be better able to participate directly or indirectly in Instructional Leadership Team roles in their communities in order to promote high quality science instruction for their students.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn about our current understanding of administrators' knowledge of evolution and evolution education law and walk away with a virtual toolbox of resources that can be shared with building and district level administrators to better support quality science instruction.

SPEAKERS:
Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Build a K–12 STEAM Pipeline Through Family STEAM Night

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W180


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Engage students, families, and the community in STEAM through Family STEAM Nights in order to equitably build understanding and interest in STEAM.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to create, recruit, and implement a Family STEAM Night to engage students, families, and the community in STEAM.

SPEAKERS:
McKenna Serowka (Lake Zurich High School: Lake Zurich, IL)

Inoculating Against Science Denial

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Too many students fall for disinformation. Learning facts is not enough. New research shows students need more critical-thinking skills, and supplemental curriculum helps.

TAKEAWAYS:
Critical-thinking curriculum is available to help “inoculate” students against disinformation and science denial.

SPEAKERS:
David Hundsness (Critical Thinking Project: PACIFICA, CA)

Inspiration to Fruition

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Inspiration to Fruition

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Inspiration to Fruition provides any educator with a game plan on how to take an idea and available resources and create a project that enhances the student experience and skills.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. A template for designing a grassroots STEM or PBL project; 2. Top 10 tips on how to make managing the project actually manageable; and 3. Proof that trusting one's intuition to build a project based on an inspirational event can bring to fruition an amazing experience for students.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Hartings (Indian Hill Middle School: Cincinnati, OH), Jessica Brown (Teacher: cincinnati, OH)

Digging Deeper into the Data with an Adapted CER Framework

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

This session focuses on improved outcomes for students’ written science explanations when including data description prompts and instructional facilitation to adapt the CER framework.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn about the importance of a preliminary step of incorporating data descriptions when utilizing the CER framework to guide students’ written explanations and reasoning of data visualization.

SPEAKERS:
Andrea Drewes (Rider University: Lawrenceville, NJ)

What do these numbers actually mean? Rethinking Student Grades and Scoring.

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W181b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Biology Assessment Standards.docx
What do these numbers actually mean.pptx

STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

A grading system based on total points does not accurately reflect the level of student understanding of science content. Students who demonstrate that they understand half of the content should not earn a failing score. Nor should students earn arbitrary points for doing non-science content related things. Student scores should reflect what a student understands and not how well the student can play the game we call school. We teachers are encouraged to do standards based grading, but not everyone knows how or where to start or even if it is worth putting forth the effort to make the change. Participants will be led through my journey in becoming a teacher who uses standards based grading. The struggles in changing my mindset about grades and the way I grade will be presented as well as the benefits of having a better understanding of what the students actually know, having student grades more accurately reflect what they know, having fewer students fail among other things. Basic strategies for assessing level of understanding will also be presented. Time will be given for questions and answers.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will be given strategies about changing their view of scoring students by the total number of points they got correct verses the student's level of understanding.

SPEAKERS:
Meredith Diehl (Northview High School: Sylvania, OH)

STEM Engagement and Collaboration in Jurassic Proportions

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W187a


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Explore the many ways dinosaurs and paleontology can be integrated into STEM curricula to attract all learners. Resources and collaboration ideas will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will walk away with a plethora of hands-on ideas and resources (including children's literature) relating to dinosaurs, paleontology, and community resources to help inspire all learners in their contexts.

SPEAKERS:
Catherine Pangan (Butler University: Indianapolis, IN), Becky Wolfe (The Children's Museum of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

Building a Better ADI Understanding: Using Student-Created Avatars to Explain Past Scientist Experiences with ADI

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W176a


STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

This presentation reviews students researching and presenting on past ADI events in science through the creation of scientist avatars.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. This session highlights the use of a classroom-tested assignment where students are asked to create a personal avatar where they are pretending to be the actual scientist; and 2. The assignment works well to show actual ADI events that explain how science changes over time.

SPEAKERS:
William Sumrall (The University of Mississippi: University, MS)

Overview of Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate Initiative, and Kikim Media

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W184b-c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate In

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

This session will introduce participants to Our Beautiful Planet,  a collection of classroom-ready films and lesson plans that highlight the science and engineering practices scientists use to explain the phenomenon of climate change. The collection of over 10 lessons brings Sensemaking to environmental science by cultivating student curiosity with engaging and eye-popping phenomena.

TAKEAWAYS:
Our Beautiful Planet is a series of compelling 5-7 minute science films and lessons highlighting the cutting-edge research that climate scientists are doing to solve some of the world’s most pressing issues.

SPEAKERS:
Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Integrating Computer Science into Science Courses Without Losing Your Mind

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W175a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Orban_nsta22.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Computer science CAN be integrated into high school science classes. Here are some ideas from the STEMcoding Project!

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will work on three "STEMcoding" activities on: 1. climate change with connection to spreadsheets; 2. orbital motion for Earth science; and 3. the first of the "physics of video games" activities.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Orban (The Ohio State University at Marion: Marion, OH)

Approaches to Assessment and Grading that Support Student Sensemaking

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

As educators shift their teaching practice to align with the Framework for K-12 Science and the NGSS, they face various challenges and barriers. One pressing challenge is how to align their new approach to teaching and learning with existing assessment and grading systems. In this session, we will present provide examples of 3D assessments and associated scoring guidance. Participants will review student work for these sample assessments and identify evidence of understanding. They will collaborate with others in the session and determine how they would give grades based on set criteria. The second part of the session will highlight different approaches to grading based on local grading expectations (e.g., standards-based grading, daily grade requirements, or 100 point-based systems). Participants will leave the session with approaches to assessment and grading that support student sensemaking and honor the diverse resources students bring to the classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave the session with approaches to assessment and grading that support student sensemaking and honor the diverse resources students bring to the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Phenomena to Questions: Practical Engagement Strategies for Student Sensemaking

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Phenomena to Questions .pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Explore how to use phenomena to generate student questions that allow for further investigation to support student sensemaking.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to effectively use phenomena to allow for authentic student questioning and how to use those questions to increase student engagement and sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Nicole Vick (Northwestern University: No City, No State)

Self-Paced STEM and Equity for All Learners

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W181c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Self-Paced STEM and Equity for All Learners Slideshow

STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

Self-paced classrooms are a means to run a STEM class where the teacher becomes a facilitator of learning to their students. A self-paced classroom is one where the students will engage with the class material at a rate that is appropriate for them. Assignments are rated into different categories worth different point values so that students can make a choice each day in how they want to approach their learning. This kind of environment encourages development of executive functioning skills, cooperative learning skills, and other soft skills necessary to be successful as a 21st century learner, scientist, or engineer. It also meets the needs of both the highest and the lowest functioning learners. In this session, we will learn in more detail about self-paced classrooms, how to implement them, and how to develop different types of activities and locate resources that work well for this kind of environment, including interactive digital notebooks, pixel art, EdPuzzles, digital crossword puzzles, lab experiments, digital and live escape rooms, and more! Join me as we learn how we can make equity for all enjoyable for all the students.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to use various computer programs, specifically in the Google Suite, to create an equitable classroom environment.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Stewart-Miranda (Greater Lowell Technical High School: Tyngsboro, MA)

Write from the Start

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W176c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Have you read great articles in the NSTA journals that changed or added to the ways you and your students do science for the better? You could inspire other educators across the country in the same way by sharing your teaching ideas, activities or lessons as an NSTA journal author!

TAKEAWAYS:
Tips on how to prepare and submit your manuscript for publication in NSTA's journals.

SPEAKERS:
Peter Lindeman (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Elizabeth Barrett-Zahn (Columbus Elementary School: New Rochelle, NY)

Energizing Your Achievement - Shell Teacher Awards

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM