AAPT 2023 Winter Meeting - January 14-17
 

2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

Keyword

Strand








Topic



























Session Type











Grade Level



Pricing

Displaying 17 results

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
Add to My Agenda

Increasing Scientific Literacy: Strategies, Free Activities, and Resources That Work!

McCormick Place - W178a

Participants will learn strategies and receive numerous resources that increase students’ scientific literacy. The hands-on approach has participants engaged in the activities, games, and more.

Takeaways: Attendees will: 1. learn new strategies for incorporating scientific literacy into their lessons; and 2. receive numerous activities, templates, games, and other resources to help with doing this. These resources can be used “as is” or modified to allow for differentiation based on the needs of the learners. Strategies and resources will include ones effective with ELL and EC students.

Speakers

Iris Mudd (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools: Winston Salem, NC)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
Add to My Agenda

Engineering for Us All: Exploring the "Why," "What," and "Who" of Engineering

McCormick Place - W194a

“You’re good at math; be an engineer.” Isn’t there more to it? Who is an engineer? Engineering helps society by solving problems. Let’s explore “why.”

Takeaways: Learn that engineering is more than math + science and take away classroom activities addressing engineering identity, ethics, and society (not your typical engineering activities).

Speakers

Ken Reid (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Baseball card lesson
Baseball card lesson (complete)
Playpump lesson
Product archaeology lesson
Robot arm lesson (with materials list)
Shoe sole sketch and design lesson
Slides from presentation
More information on e4usa

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
Add to My Agenda

Exploring a General-Education Science Class Designed to Teach Skills, Not Facts

McCormick Place - W186a

General-education science classes are often the last chance we have to empower students with the science literacy skills necessary to navigate today’s world. But what is science literacy? Memorizing facts and following recipe-like labs? Or is it understanding how the process of science learns about the world by testing explanations and critically scrutinizing the evidence? A good science education teaches students how, not what, to think. Science isn’t just what we know; it’s how we know. This presentation explores a novel course developed using a backward design approach designed to teach the essential skills of critical thinking, information literacy, and science literacy. By focusing on the process of science over content, students learn how to evaluate the evidence for claims to determine how we know something. Directly including pseudoscience (e.g. astrology, psychics, homeopathy, Bigfoot) and science denial (e.g. climate change, evolution, GMOs) increases engagement, addresses common misconceptions, and teaches students how to recognize the characteristics of good science. Assignments and activities in which students actively create misinformation inoculates them against the real thing. Finally, providing students with a structured toolkit to evaluate claims (with lots of opportunities to practice) helps students apply what they’re learning to the “real world.”

Takeaways: The goal of general education science should not be memorizing facts, but learning the essential skills of critical thinking, information literacy, and science literacy.

Speakers

Melanie Trecek-King (Massasoit Community College: , 0)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Teach Skills Not Facts Handout
Teach Skills, Not Facts Article

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
Add to My Agenda

Zombie Apocalypse!

McCormick Place - W194b

Sponsoring Company: Texas Instruments

Attendees will explore disease modeling through the use of real (virtual) ZOMBIES!

Takeaways: 1. This session will explore disease-spread modeling using fictional zombies; 2. Attendees will also see how using Hollywood themes combined with actual STEM careers can be a fun way to engage students in learning science and STEM; and 3. Attendees will find out about free science and STEM lessons from Texas Instruments.

Speakers

Jeffrey Lukens (Retired Science Teacher: Sioux Falls, SD)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Add to My Agenda

Using Maggots, Flies, and Flesh to Solve a Mystery!

McCormick Place - W194b

Sponsoring Company: Texas Instruments

An empty field. A human corpse. Maggots and flies. Who is the victim? What happened? Can you solve the mystery? This middle and high school activity will challenge you to apply science and deductive reasoning to determine what happened!

Takeaways: 1. Forensic science is a STEM career field that combines science, math, and criminal justice concepts; 2. Understanding the natural process of decomposition can help investigators narrow in on identifying victims and causes of death; and 3. Using stories is a great way to engage students and provide context to the science/STEM they are learning.

Speakers

Jeffrey Lukens (Retired Science Teacher: Sioux Falls, SD)

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
Add to My Agenda

Digging Deeper into the Data with an Adapted CER Framework

McCormick Place - W185b-c

This session focuses on improved outcomes for students’ written science explanations when including data description prompts and instructional facilitation to adapt the CER framework.

Takeaways: Learn about the importance of a preliminary step of incorporating data descriptions when utilizing the CER framework to guide students’ written explanations and reasoning of data visualization.

Speakers

Andrea Drewes (Rider University: Lawrenceville, NJ)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
Add to My Agenda

Taking the Next Steps with Vocabulary: New Strategies to Increase Word Relationships

McCormick Place - W470a

Sponsoring Company: STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning

Are you looking for an engaging and innovative way to get your students to understand not only the meaning of a word, but how it fits into the bigger picture? Put on your thinking cap and join us as we use vocabulary to take students on a learning adventure! Experience ways to zoom in and zoom out of science content using a variety of differentiated strategies and structures. Take these ideas straight back to your classroom for immediate use. Great for intervention!

Takeaways: Explore intervention strategies to help struggling students in STEM.

Speakers

Jacque Garcia (STEMscopes by Accelerate Learning: Houston, TX)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

STEMscopes-NSTA-2022-July22-Science-Vocabulary.pdf

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
Add to My Agenda

Solving Environmental Issues Through Civic Action, Invention and Primary Sources

McCormick Place - W194a

Identifying problems, and complaining about them, is a talent many might claim. Identifying a problem and creating a solution is much less common but remains a core scientific principle needed to help students change the world. Finding a solution, however, is not enough; there must be an implementation plan as well. Scientific literacy teaches students to pinpoint and explore problems, but they must also take civic action--beginning in their own backyards. This session will introduce primary source-based inquiry learning tools by PBS NewsHour Classroom and Indiana University’s Center on Representative Government to help teachers meet this need. The workshop will consist of two NGSS-aligned activities on the connection between the environment and civic action.

Takeaways: How to engage students in identifying environmental phenomena in their own backyards and how to take action to address it.

Speakers

Elizabeth Osborn (Indiana University Bloomington: Bloomington, IN), Victoria Pasquantonio (PBS NewsHour: Arlington, VA)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
Add to My Agenda

Use NASA’s Universe of Learning integrated STEM Learning and Literacy Program (UoL) and its network of informal education partners to learn about the universe

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 27

The Universe of Learning partnerships provides STEM educators tools, from exoplanet searches and robotic telescopes to image analysis, to implement programs specific to individual audiences.

Takeaways: NASA’s UoL STEM program partnerships provide a wide range of free materials, projects and interactive activities that can easily be incorporated into any educational setting.

Speakers

Donna Young (NASA/NSO/UoL Program Manager: Laughlin, NV)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

UoL NASA NSO Poster.pdf
NASA's Universe of Learning Astrophysics STEM Outreach Program
National Science Olympiad

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
Add to My Agenda

Global Conversations: International Film Festival and Share-a-thon

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 21

In this self-directed session, you will be able to: Interact with educators in face-to-face poster presentations; Watch short video submissions from educators around the world; and Participate in hands-on/minds-on, takeaway learning experiences.

Takeaways: Science education occurs everywhere on this planet. We can get ideas and best practices from collegues around the world.

Speakers

Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Add to My Agenda

The Shape of Stories: An SEL Introduction to Data Visualization

McCormick Place - W183c

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to the work of Kurt Vonnegut who argued that stories have shapes that can be graphed. They will explore different ways of graphing simple stories and how this technique can be used at all grade levels to introduce data visualization. Participants will also see examples of story graphs from different perspectives and discuss how this can be used as a tool to teach students about data representation and interpretation. Following the introduction, participants will engage in a story graphing activity, creating a graph of their own story and sharing it with another participant. We will then reflect on this experience and discuss how the activity can be used in the context of social emotional learning with both students and educators. Participants will then explore story graphing and data visualization resources and discuss how they might use these resources to address specific STEM topics or to integrate multiple content areas such as math, science, and art in their classrooms.

Takeaways: Learn how to introduce graphing and data visualization using stories and how this strategy can be used in connection with social emotional learning to engage and empower educators and students.

Speakers

Anna Babarinde (Sonoma County Office of Education: Santa Rosa, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

The Shape of Stories An SEL Introduction to Data Visualization.pdf

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Add to My Agenda

Climate, COVID, Conspiracy, and Classrooms: Supporting scientific literacy by fighting science denialism

McCormick Place - W186b

Science denial, anti-intellectualism, and conspiracy theories have long, sordid histories. Today, rampant science denialism threatens personal and public health, economic sustainability, and prosperity. Globally, it poses existential threats to humanity. How has the situation deteriorated so far? How can so many people deny, not only the reality of climate change - a slow-moving and invisible enemy - but also the reality of a global pandemic and the effectiveness of simple protective/preventive strategies? The explanation is straightforward. Widespread scientific illiteracy enables moneyed and/or politically powerful interests to manipulate a credulous public in ways that undermine understanding of science and generate distrust of the scientific community. Campaigns often waged on unregulated social media are disturbingly effective. When disinformation, willful ignorance, and belligerence strike, who's on call? Right now, almost nobody ... and that's a problem for all of us who, as science educators, understand and value the role of science in general, and STEM topics and approaches more specifically. We will then explore a variety of online resources and discuss individualized teaching strategies that educators can deploy to overcome these challenges in our classrooms.

Takeaways: This workshop will briefly review the history, driving forces behind, and current status of science denialism, to clarify what we are up against. We will then explore online resources and individualized teaching strategies that can overcome these challenges in our classrooms. No single "magic bullet" (or magic YouTube video) can rescue us. We need a full-court press by all of us in education, focusing on cultivating in our students a true understanding of the nature of science, appreciation for the value of expertise in STEM fields, and a willingness to engage on a personal level with disturbingly cult-like beliefs.

Speakers

Joseph Levine (Science Writer and Producer: Concord, MA)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
Add to My Agenda

Science Education in an Age of Misinformation

McCormick Place - W184d

We are living in an Age of Misinformation. Developing the capabilities to evaluate scientific information is a key goal of scientific literacy. Moreover, “obtaining, evaluating and communicating information” is a core practice of NGSS. The NGSS standards, however, were developed a decade ago before misinformation became so pervasive and were not developed to address this threat. Much of this misinformation is scientific. Therefore, this session will present a set of ideas and materials about how to address this challenge. These have emerged from a report developed at Stanford University drawing on the expertise of an international group of science educators, scientists and psychologists entitled “Science Education in an Age of Misinformation”. In this session, we will present the main arguments and recommendations of the report. Using a set of practical, web-based classroom examples, participants will work in small groups to trial and discuss the suggested teaching approaches and materials we have developed. Opportunities will be provided for feedback, questions and discussion in a final plenary. What we will present will empower teachers of science with ways they can support their students to avoid being misled by the purveyors of misinformation.

Takeaways: Participants will learn what are the challenges posed by misinformation and what they can do to help science education address this challenge using practical examples of exercises and ionnovative teaching materials.

Speakers

Daniel Pimentel (Stanford University: Stanford, CA)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
Add to My Agenda

Classroom Communities that Thrive through Camaraderie and Connection

McCormick Place - W185a

It takes time and intentionality to build a community of learners who trust each other, respect differing perspectives, share ideas freely, and seek feedback from their peers. This session explores a variety of strategies that can be easily implemented to build this culture and community from day one. Strategies that foster this type of connection, collaboration, and camaraderie will be discussed using examples and tips to implement in the classroom, starting with some fresh ideas for getting to know students and helping them get to know their classmates. Many of these ideas combine strategies we already know and add a collaborative and inclusive spin to them. Allowing for multiple types of student interaction is important to ensure all voices are heard and valued, not just the loud and proud. Including time for students to process independently, in small groups, and in the large group is important to developing an inclusive community. A variety of strategies will be shared to support these levels of interaction in the classroom, making student thinking visible in individual, small group, and whole group displays.

Takeaways: Teachers can elevate their practices to include all students and develop a classroom culture that invites student interaction, increases student engagement, and fosters equitable experiences on a daily basis.

Speakers

Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Classroom Communities that Thrive through Camaraderie and Connection Folder

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Add to My Agenda

Cultural Competence Matters: Improving Cultural Competence through Effective Interpersonal Communication

McCormick Place - W185b-c

Culturally relevant pedagogy embodies a professional, political, cultural, ethnical, and ideological disposition that supersedes mundane teaching acts; it is centered in fundamental beliefs about teaching, learning, students, their families, and their communities, and an unyielding commitment to see student success become less rhetoric and more of a reality. This session will aid in building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning. In this session, we will exhibit how to identify the key characteristics of culturally responsive lessons. Attendees will acquire lesson design methods that employ cultural competence and effective communication. Attendees will use collaborate boards during the presentation to respond and interact. Activities to exhibit how students identify with what they know in the classroom will be utilized to help educators make connections and apply this information when planning lessons.

Takeaways: Building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning.

Speakers

Kelly Haynes (Baker High School: Baker, LA), Jennifer Norwood (Instructional Support Specialist: , 0), Tara Hollins (Exceptional Student Services Educator: Zachary, LA)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
Add to My Agenda

Creating a Science Classroom Podcast

McCormick Place - W187c

Marshall Escamilla, one of the co-hosts of the freely-available Tumble Science Podcast for Kids, will share some of the basics of creating a podcast with your class. Classroom podcasts are a great way for students to share their learning with the broader community, and can be used both as assessment and communication tools--and it's a lot easier to do than you'd think. Beginning with a brief description of what features make Tumble free and accessible, Marshall will walk educators through all the thing they'll need to consider when creating a podcast. We'll start by asking questions like: -Who is the intended audience for this podcast? -What is the overall topic for it? -How many episodes do we want to create, and how often do we want to release them? Then we'll move on to some of the technical elements. What are the requirements for creating a podcast studio in your classroom? What equipment do you need to buy? What software do students need to have access to? how do you ensure that students can have access to what they need in order to be successful? Finally, we will discuss some of the basic skills teachers will need to ensure student success: knowledge of best audio recording practices, and how to use a few easily-accessible software tools to make students' work sound its best.

Takeaways: Attendees at this ession will learn the very basics of how to create a classroom podcast from a professional podcaster.

Speakers

Marshall Escamilla (Tumble Media Production: Greenfield, MA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Podcasting NSTA Session Resources

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
Add to My Agenda

Designing Escape Boxes

McCormick Place - W183b

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

Takeaways: Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

Speakers

Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.