2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

Grade Level


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Strands









Session Type












FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Hands-On Workshop, Literacy

 

16 results

Increasing Scientific Literacy: Strategies, Free Activities, and Resources That Work!

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W178a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Participants will learn strategies and receive numerous resources that increase students’ scientific literacy. The hands-on approach has participants engaged in the activities, games, and more.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will: 1. learn new strategies for incorporating scientific literacy into their lessons; and 2. receive numerous activities, templates, games, and other resources to help with doing this. These resources can be used “as is” or modified to allow for differentiation based on the needs of the learners. Strategies and resources will include ones effective with ELL and EC students.

SPEAKERS:
Iris Mudd (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools: Winston Salem, NC)

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) - An Effective Approach to Ensuring an Inclusive Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines are a tool that can be used to design learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners (CAST, 2018). Instructional designers and teachers can use these principles to create learning environments that reduce barriers to access for all students, while keeping in mind the learning goals of the lesson. The three guiding principles of UDL are engagement, representation, and action and expression. In this session educators will be provided with examples of these principles in action in sample materials from OpenSciEd and classroom videos. In these examples, participating will identify how the materials have been purposefully designed with multiple avenues for engagement, representation, and action and expression. Additionally, they will identify the built-in supports for teachers to highlight student assets and to address potential barriers to learning for their local student population. Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Supporting Civically Engaged Argument Writing in Science and Technology Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W178b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Guided Session Notes and Resources

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Participants will use a graphic organizer to record their thinking as I describe a unit I taught in which students in grades 9-12 explored issues related to artificial intelligence. Students crafted op-Eds advocating for what we should do in our community about emerging technologies like driverless cars and facial recognition. As I describe the unit, I will highlight how I (1) kicked off the unit with a phenomenon that raised questions about convenience, safety, security, equity, and justice; (2) layered on texts and encouraged students to grapple with multiple perspectives on AI-related issues; (3) used routines and mentor texts to support students in crafting claims and connecting evidence to their claims; and (4) engaged students in processes of revision. Then, participants will work in self-selected groups to explore science/technology/society text sets on topics like lab grown meat and space debris. As they explore the text set, they will engage with a classroom routine to develop a compelling, debatable, defensible, and nuanced claim. Participants will share what they discovered as they explored the text set and wrote claims in their group and will reflect on how these text sets and routines might become part of their classroom practice.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about freely available text sets and classroom routines developed by teachers for supporting civically engaged argument writing about science and technology issues in society.

SPEAKERS:
John Smith (Chester A Arthur School: Philadelphia, PA)

Broaden Science Participation: Unpack “Analyze & Interpret” to Teach Data As an Equalizer

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document and a slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

We live in a data-driven world, and our students will be working in a data-driven workforce. Therefore, it is critical that our Pre-K-12 students learn foundational data literacy skills. However, currently these skills are too often only taught in upper-level classes. All students need these skills and all students, down to our little Pre-Kers, can work with and make sense of science data. Let’s make sure data is an equalizer, rather than another divider in our educational system and society! Join us as we explore what perception and learning science tell us about how our brains process data. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources to build science knowledge and self-efficacy through data. Finally, we will explore ways to adapt our existing curriculum activities and data visualizations to help our students more equitably access science. Through hands-on activities and group discussions, participants will leave more empowered to leverage data and data visualizations into their science content in purposeful ways for all learners. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall 21st century skills. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century for all students and ways to adjust existing curriculum to leverage data as entry points into science inquiry, sensemaking, and knowledge for all learners to see themselves in STEM.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

Becoming AJEDIIs: Teaching and leading STEM education during a pandemic using chemistry and other eqSTrEAM ideas

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W178a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
AJEDII Presentation
Overview of how Historically Responsive Literacy (Muhammad, 2020) is applied to chemistry.
Oil Spill Simulation Inquiry
This is a full description of the oil spill simulation that represents STEM as a key component of "cultivating genius". Integrating STEM meaningfully into lessons as a way to allow students to experience joy while building skills, criticality and intellect.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Building on workshops facilitated by Gholdy Muhammad during the 2020-2021 academic year, STEM teachers will explore how historically responsive literacy can be extended to science teaching and learning. The AJEDII Model considers how accessibility, justice, equity, diversity and identity shape pedagogy. Participants will review the framework, develop units aligned to current student learning standards, and explore resources developed by facilitators for a range of instructional modes and situations. When COVID-19 hit our schools, STEM educators took on the task of processing and fighting misinformation, teaching and training students, parents, colleagues and other adults in their community about a wide range of technical terms and implementing novel pedagogical technologies and techniques like never before. The imagined worlds of science fiction were being realized but the ending still has not been determined and has certainly not been predictable. Unfortunately, the pandemic that became most clear in 2020 was exacerbated by social problems that could no longer be ignored. Participants will leave the session with materials for designing instruction for virtual (asynchronous or synchronous) and face-to-face learning based on facilitators’ experiences.

TAKEAWAYS:
STEM educators will apply Muhammad's (2020) historically responsive framework to secondary STEM education in learning design

SPEAKERS:
Joy Barnes-Johnson (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Shefali Mehta (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Mridula Bajaj (Mount Laurel Schools: Mount Laurel, NJ)

Exploring Energy Forms and Transformations in the Real World

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W185a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

NEED’s Science of Energy stations provide a hands-on approach to experimenting with objects used in student’s daily lives while incorporating scientific processing skills such as making observations, measuring, recording results, compare and contrast, categorize, make predictions, analyze and graph results, and draw conclusions. Workshop participants will rotate through six stations just as their students would in the classroom or OST Program, to learn about the different forms of energy and energy transformations using objects such as a toy car, apple, yo-yo, compass, bouncy ball, glow stick, etc. Using the same materials, the station guides can be easily differentiated for elementary, intermediate, and secondary levels. Each station includes a "What's Happening" article that provides additional informational text on the energy transformation that took place at the station and ties to more real-life examples for further visualization and understanding. The station guides have been correlated to each state’s individual science and math standards, as well as effectively support Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Workshop participants will engage in hands-on experiments just as their students would, using items we encounter in our daily lives that demonstrate energy forms and their transformations and applications to real-life examples for further visualization and understanding.

SPEAKERS:
Cori Nelson (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA)

Data, Tables, Graphs, Oh My! Strategies to Get All Students Doing & Speaking Science

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Access to Resource Document
Complete the Google Form to gain access to the Resource Document and slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

We are naturally curious, prone to ask why? How? What? Unfortunately, somewhere along the way students lose the trust in their voices to ask questions of and from data. But data are what we use to do science and it permeates all aspects of society today. What should we do? Stop teaching the vocabulary of science and data first, and instead leverage classroom-ready strategies to empower students to lead with their innate curiosity to practice critical 21st century data literacy skills and master the science content. Join us to explore connections between our science content, inquiry-based activities, and data skills. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy and student empowerment. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better help students do and communicate science. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall self-identity as a scientist. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century, how students can do a lot more with data than we often think or presume from their science vocabulary alone, and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into 6-12 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Using the Scientific Process to Conquer Smallpox

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W196a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

We can examine natural phenomena and address wicked problems using the scientific process. The smallpox virus emerged approximately 10,000 years ago, and the virus's global spread devastated civilizations. Thanks to the scientific thinking of a Buddhist nun, a milkmaid, and Edward Jenner, smallpox was declared eradicated in 1979 by the World Health Organization. To support the understanding of the nature of science in the NGSS (Appendix H), session participants will engage in activities that demonstrate how science is used to answer questions about the natural world through a process that is consistent, observational, natural, predictable, tentative, and testable. Additionally, participants will examine various media sources to learn how to identify scientific misinformation and the tactics used to make misinformation appear credible. The National Center for Science Education supports science teachers through free professional development and curriculum to recognize and address science misconceptions using the three dimensions of the NGSS. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
This session introduces participants to a basic understanding of the scientific process, how our knowledge of the natural world evolves with new evidence, and that science cannot answer questions that do not pertain to natural processes. Attendees will take a deep dive into an NGSS storyline sequence developed to help students understand that science is an ongoing process that must be supported by multiple lines of evidence to be accepted by the scientific community.

SPEAKERS:
Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), DeeDee Wright (Colorado State University: Fort Collins, CO), Cari Herndon (National Center for Science Education: No City, No State), Ayesha Alirahi (Science Teacher: , 0), Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Meet Me in the Middle, Lite: A Share-a-Thon

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
UIC Teacher Fellows Info
Informational Flyer on Teacher Fellows program to develop classroom learning companion robots

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Engage in a variety of activities, collect information and resources, and network with middle level leaders. Discover new ideas and materials that you can use next week.

TAKEAWAYS:
The participants will network with other middle level science educators and leaders to discover and engage in activities that will expand their knowledge and be usable in all aspects of their work.

SPEAKERS:
Mary Lou Lipscomb (National Middle Level Science Teachers Association: Naperville, IL), Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Carey Dieleman (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ), Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA), Suzanne Cunningham (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN), Katy Garvey (The Source for Learning, Inc.: Reston, VA), Nicole Green (Animalearn: Jenkintown, PA), Joseph Michaelis (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Kim Nagle (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Anne Farley Schoeffler (Seton Catholic School: Hudson, OH), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Corydon Strawser (Lake Nona Middle School: Orlando, FL), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA), Barbara Phillips-Bredlow (Northeast Nodaway School District: Ravenwood, MO), Dawn Konieczny (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Erin Towns (Edward Little High School: Auburn, ME)

Discussion-Based Learning: How to Use Talk as a Tool

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Academic discourse is a vital part of promoting student sensemaking. Learn how discourse can be used to promote equity and access in the science classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to use discussion strategies in the classroom to move student thinking forward, use talk as a formative assessment, and build a classroom culture that promotes student discussion.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Cheryl Knight (Orland Junior High School: Orland Park, IL)

Solving Environmental Issues Through Civic Action, Invention and Primary Sources

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W194a


Show Details

Identifying problems, and complaining about them, is a talent many might claim. Identifying a problem and creating a solution is much less common but remains a core scientific principle needed to help students change the world. Finding a solution, however, is not enough; there must be an implementation plan as well. Scientific literacy teaches students to pinpoint and explore problems, but they must also take civic action--beginning in their own backyards. This session will introduce primary source-based inquiry learning tools by PBS NewsHour Classroom and Indiana University’s Center on Representative Government to help teachers meet this need. The workshop will consist of two NGSS-aligned activities on the connection between the environment and civic action.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to engage students in identifying environmental phenomena in their own backyards and how to take action to address it.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Osborn (Indiana University Bloomington: Bloomington, IN), Victoria Pasquantonio (PBS NewsHour: Arlington, VA)

The Shape of Stories: An SEL Introduction to Data Visualization

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W183c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
The Shape of Stories An SEL Introduction to Data Visualization.pdf

STRAND: Coping in Resilience in Science and STEM Teaching

Show Details

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to the work of Kurt Vonnegut who argued that stories have shapes that can be graphed. They will explore different ways of graphing simple stories and how this technique can be used at all grade levels to introduce data visualization. Participants will also see examples of story graphs from different perspectives and discuss how this can be used as a tool to teach students about data representation and interpretation. Following the introduction, participants will engage in a story graphing activity, creating a graph of their own story and sharing it with another participant. We will then reflect on this experience and discuss how the activity can be used in the context of social emotional learning with both students and educators. Participants will then explore story graphing and data visualization resources and discuss how they might use these resources to address specific STEM topics or to integrate multiple content areas such as math, science, and art in their classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to introduce graphing and data visualization using stories and how this strategy can be used in connection with social emotional learning to engage and empower educators and students.

SPEAKERS:
Anna Babarinde (Sonoma County Office of Education: Santa Rosa, CA)

E.O. Wilson in the Comics: Biophilia, Biodiversity, and Science Literacy for a More Inclusive Audience

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W181b


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Guide your students to compose elements of graphic novels inspired by the graphic novel version of Naturalist and Black Birder Christian Cooper’s It’s a Bird.

TAKEAWAYS:
Comics and graphic novels can engage diverse learners to understand the nature of STEM and encourage them to craft their own stories, with interdisciplinary thinking across science, social studies, history, math, and language arts.

SPEAKERS:
Dennis Liu (E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation: Durham, NC)

Disciplinary Literacy Essentials: 10 Essentials for Science Teaching and Learning

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Michigan Disciplinary Literacy and Science Leaders have developed 10 Essentials for Disciplinary Literacy and we are supporting teachers in learning about them and using them in their classrooms. We will share these 10 essentials with all participants and provide a copy of them. Then, we work collaboratively to identify opportunities in participants' lessons where they are already using these disciplinary literacy opportunities and where they might adapt their lesson to more successfully include an essential.

TAKEAWAYS:
NGSS-aligned science learning can leverage the disciplinary literacy essentials.

SPEAKERS:
Mary Starr (Michigan Mathematics and Science Leadership Network: No City, No State), Wendi Vogel (Kent Intermediate School District: Grand Rapids, MI)

Designing Escape Boxes

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)