2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Preservice Science Education

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
16 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Lucy’s Legacy – Human Evolution for the 21st Century Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The 1974 discovery of the iconic Lucy fossil in Ethiopia changed our understanding of human origins. Almost everyone today knows of Lucy, but over the last 48 years the field of human origins has exploded thanks to new discoveries all over the world as well as critical new developments in the realm of molecular biology. Few biology classes address these advances. However, the tools and techniques students learn in STEM classes have a direct connection to the advances and changes that have shaped modern work with human origins. Attending this session will give you the chance to appreciate the revolution that has occurred since “Lucy” and offer you tools to bring new understanding to your students in ways you can weave into your curriculum in less controversial ways connected to evolution, fossils, DNA, proteomics, genealogy, biogeography, 3D printing, as well as topics related to more recent human evolution (skin color, lactose tolerance, and high-altitude adaptation). As a 32-year K-12 human evolution educator who has been fortunate to work with leaders in the field, I have had a front row seat to many of the milestones of human evolution in the 21st century and I’m eager to share them with you.

TAKEAWAYS:
Since the discovery of Lucy, our understanding of human origins has grown and changed thanks to new discoveries and technologies – participants will learn about these amazing changes and how to integrate these new discoveries into their biology curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
John Mead (St. Mark's School of Texas: Allen, TX)

Zombie Apocalypse!

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W194b


Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Texas Instruments

Attendees will explore disease modeling through the use of real (virtual) ZOMBIES!

TAKEAWAYS:
1. This session will explore disease-spread modeling using fictional zombies; 2. Attendees will also see how using Hollywood themes combined with actual STEM careers can be a fun way to engage students in learning science and STEM; and 3. Attendees will find out about free science and STEM lessons from Texas Instruments.

SPEAKERS:
Jeffrey Lukens (Retired Science Teacher: Sioux Falls, SD)

Crash Science: When Physics Meets Biology

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Use innovative video-assisted STEM activities, demonstrations, award-winning videos, and behind-the-crash-tests tours to teach the science of car crashes. Visit classroom.iihs.org for more information.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants learn how to incorporate culminating STEM design challenges (Project Pedestrian Sensors and Egg-Carrying Paper Car Crash) into their curriculum to promote student awareness and understanding of how engineering and technology are used to build safer vehicles.

SPEAKERS:
Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

Model-Based Inquiry in Biology: Three-Dimensional Instructional Units for Grades 9–12

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W176c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

We will introduce our recently published NSTA book containing a collection of units and resources to help teachers engage students in three-dimensional learning through model-based inquiry.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how model-based inquiry supports three-dimensional sensemaking across the arc of a unit of instruction in biology classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Campbell (University of Connecticut: Storrs Mansfield, CT)

Solving Environmental Issues Through Civic Action, Invention and Primary Sources

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W194a


Show Details

Identifying problems, and complaining about them, is a talent many might claim. Identifying a problem and creating a solution is much less common but remains a core scientific principle needed to help students change the world. Finding a solution, however, is not enough; there must be an implementation plan as well. Scientific literacy teaches students to pinpoint and explore problems, but they must also take civic action--beginning in their own backyards. This session will introduce primary source-based inquiry learning tools by PBS NewsHour Classroom and Indiana University’s Center on Representative Government to help teachers meet this need. The workshop will consist of two NGSS-aligned activities on the connection between the environment and civic action.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to engage students in identifying environmental phenomena in their own backyards and how to take action to address it.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Osborn (Indiana University Bloomington: Bloomington, IN), Victoria Pasquantonio (PBS NewsHour: Arlington, VA)

Use NASA’s Universe of Learning integrated STEM Learning and Literacy Program (UoL) and its network of informal education partners to learn about the universe

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 27



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NASA's Universe of Learning Astrophysics STEM Outreach Program
National Science Olympiad
UoL NASA NSO Poster.pdf

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

The Universe of Learning partnerships provides STEM educators tools, from exoplanet searches and robotic telescopes to image analysis, to implement programs specific to individual audiences.

TAKEAWAYS:
NASA’s UoL STEM program partnerships provide a wide range of free materials, projects and interactive activities that can easily be incorporated into any educational setting.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Young (NASA/NSO/UoL Program Manager: Laughlin, NV)

EVOLUTIONARY MOVERS & SHAKERS: Researching, Debating, and Ranking the “Top 20” Evolutionary Scientists of All Time.

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 26


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Don’t debate evolution – Rather dig deeper into evolution by having your students research, debate, & rank the top evolutionary thinkers of all time.

TAKEAWAYS:
Rather than stage a debate over evolution which tends to be fraught with misinformation, have your students debate & rank the top figures in the history of evolutionary thought. They can then compare their ranking with that of a group of evolutionary experts.

Game Theory & Escape Rooms

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 31


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Escape-room activities offer promise for fun and function in developing social problem-solving skills. Participants will learn implementation and design strategies for their own ER environments.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how escape rooms help to engage students in dynamic learning environments and how to begin developing up your own activities.

SPEAKERS:
Joy Barnes-Johnson (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Mridula Bajaj (Mount Laurel Schools: Mount Laurel, NJ), Shefali Mehta (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ)

Climate, COVID, Conspiracy, and Classrooms: Supporting scientific literacy by fighting science denialism

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W186b


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Science denial, anti-intellectualism, and conspiracy theories have long, sordid histories. Today, rampant science denialism threatens personal and public health, economic sustainability, and prosperity. Globally, it poses existential threats to humanity. How has the situation deteriorated so far? How can so many people deny, not only the reality of climate change - a slow-moving and invisible enemy - but also the reality of a global pandemic and the effectiveness of simple protective/preventive strategies? The explanation is straightforward. Widespread scientific illiteracy enables moneyed and/or politically powerful interests to manipulate a credulous public in ways that undermine understanding of science and generate distrust of the scientific community. Campaigns often waged on unregulated social media are disturbingly effective. When disinformation, willful ignorance, and belligerence strike, who's on call? Right now, almost nobody ... and that's a problem for all of us who, as science educators, understand and value the role of science in general, and STEM topics and approaches more specifically. We will then explore a variety of online resources and discuss individualized teaching strategies that educators can deploy to overcome these challenges in our classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
This workshop will briefly review the history, driving forces behind, and current status of science denialism, to clarify what we are up against. We will then explore online resources and individualized teaching strategies that can overcome these challenges in our classrooms. No single "magic bullet" (or magic YouTube video) can rescue us. We need a full-court press by all of us in education, focusing on cultivating in our students a true understanding of the nature of science, appreciation for the value of expertise in STEM fields, and a willingness to engage on a personal level with disturbingly cult-like beliefs.

SPEAKERS:
Joseph Levine (Science Writer and Producer: Concord, MA)

Feeling Moody?

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W194b


Show Details

Sponsoring Company: Texas Instruments

We will bring science and coding together as participants learn to do some basic coding (no experience necessary) while developing a mood ring! The science of color mixing is explored while determining the right body temperature thresholds. Is fuchsia flirty? Should green be groovy? It’s up to you!

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn how to incorporate STEM/coding skills (no coding experience necessary) with science concepts to create a highly engaging lesson for students that tackles many of the science and engineering practices.

SPEAKERS:
Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Making Connections: Life Science, Critical Thinking, and Dissection

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W473


Show Details

Sponsoring Company: TeachKind

Research on the efficacy of non-animal dissection methods, student concerns about animal welfare, environmental issues, and cost are some of the factors contributing to the increasing demand for modern non-animal dissection options in Biology and life science classes. This workshop is timely and relevant for all Biology and life science teachers – including pre-service and beginning teachers – to deepen understanding of life science standards, increase familiarity with modern dissection resources, and apply critical thinking skills to evidence-based decision making. This interactive session will provide the opportunity for participants to unpack middle school and high school life science performance expectations from Molecules and Organisms: Structures and Processes and Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity. Participants will create consensus learning targets for life science performance expectations, gain hands-on experience with virtual dissection programs and realistic dissectible models, and evaluate evidence to support decision making for selecting dissection resources. OPTIONAL: Participants are asked to bring a laptop or other device.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will gain hands-on experience with dissection software programs and synthetic dissectible models and apply evidence-based decision making to meet the increasing demand for modern non-animal dissection options.

SPEAKERS:
Sally Sanders (TeachKind: Norfolk, VA)

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way of doing the right thing

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175c


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way to engage the community in STEM. Participants will hear from educators that have won money for their school and communities to implement STEM action projects.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how they can receive cash awards and acknowledge for STEM action projects.

SPEAKERS:
John Anderson (Toshiba America Foundation: Irvine, CA)

Cultural Competence Matters: Improving Cultural Competence through Effective Interpersonal Communication

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Culturally relevant pedagogy embodies a professional, political, cultural, ethnical, and ideological disposition that supersedes mundane teaching acts; it is centered in fundamental beliefs about teaching, learning, students, their families, and their communities, and an unyielding commitment to see student success become less rhetoric and more of a reality. This session will aid in building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning. In this session, we will exhibit how to identify the key characteristics of culturally responsive lessons. Attendees will acquire lesson design methods that employ cultural competence and effective communication. Attendees will use collaborate boards during the presentation to respond and interact. Activities to exhibit how students identify with what they know in the classroom will be utilized to help educators make connections and apply this information when planning lessons.

TAKEAWAYS:
Building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Haynes (Baker High School: Baker, LA), Jennifer Norwood (Instructional Support Specialist), Tara Hollins (Exceptional Student Services Educator: Zachary, LA)

Crash Science Inquiry: Investigating Distracted Driving Dangers

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Complete a distracted driving simulation and discover free award-winning videos, STEM activities, and real-world applications exploring science, engineering, and vehicle crashworthiness. Free lesson plans included.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how scientific and engineering principles can be modeled in classrooms using crash science–related videos and activities to promote safer personal behaviors when riding in or driving a vehicle.

SPEAKERS:
Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

DIY Digital Interactive Notebooking

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/16a_AiBztWiON2awmsWMd0b2t9v38sgubMxBB_OVxHRI/edit?usp=sharing

STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

Are you used to having your students keep a notebook, but aren’t sure how to transition it into a digital version? Have you ever wanted to try an Interactive Notebook but don’t know where to start? Are you having trouble keeping your students organized in the digital school world? Interactive Notebooks are a meaningful way to transfer a student’s learning, practice, and reflection into an engaging digital environment. Research has shown that benefits range from allowing students space to record and reflect on their experiences, guiding teacher instruction, and providing more opportunities for differentiation. As classes have shifted between in-person, hybrid, and completely online instruction, digital learning options are becoming an even more necessary part of our curriculum. During this workshop, you will learn about different types of digital notebooks, their uses/benefits, and how to find or create your own resources for student use. By converting an interactive notebook into a digital notebook, students can now access multi-media resources all in one place creating opportunities for greater flexibility and autonomy in learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Create and manage digital notebooks resources from materials you already use.

SPEAKERS:
Joy Barnes-Johnson (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Mridula Bajaj (Mount Laurel Schools: Mount Laurel, NJ), Shefali Mehta (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ)

Science Practices in Action: Video Case Studies of Science Practices of Questioning and Modeling

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W180


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Our master teacher video case studies are used to facilitate discussion about the science practices of Asking Questions and Modeling with inservice and preservice teachers.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Using classroom video as a focus of discussion can provide teachers with an avenue for substantive conversations about their teaching practice; 2. Our case studies present real classroom settings where the teachers are having their students work on the practice of questioning and/ or modeling; and 3. Participants will view the videos and reflect on how the teachers are facilitating the use of science practices in their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
David Henry (SUNY Buffalo State College: Buffalo, NY), Alayla Ende (University at Buffalo, SUNY: Buffalo, NY), Lisa Brosnick (SUNY Buffalo State College: Buffalo, NY), Alan Baczkiewicz (Sweet Home Middle School: Amherst, NY)

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