2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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100 results

Lunch: Elements of Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Wednesday, July 20 • 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Regency Ballroom


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

By Invitation Only

Shifting from traditional professional development to curriculum-based professional learning is a simple concept but complex to design and execute well. At its core, it means teachers experience the same kind of inquiry-based learning we expect them to provide their students. Learn more about a Carnegie Corporation of New York report, The Elements, which identifies a core set of research-based actions, approaches, and enabling conditions that effective schools and systems have put in place to reinforce and amplify the power of high-quality curriculum and skillful teaching.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Examine beliefs and assumptions regarding the relationship between high-quality instructional materials, curriculum-based professional learning and student success 2. Gain understanding of the foundation for The Elements, a challenge paper from Carnegie Corporation of New York 3. Learn from science practitioners whose successful curriculum implementation efforts are grounded in the elements and essentials.

SPEAKERS:
Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Homes for the Hurricane Homeless: The Integration of STEM, Place-Based Learning, and Designing Thinking in the Elementary Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W180


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Hurricanes, flash floods, and wildfires. Climate change brings more extreme weather, and the results can be catastrophic to our communities. As the weather becomes more severe, there is an increased need for shelters that can be easily transported and assembled to provide relief shelter for families who have been displaced from their homes. In this session, attendees will engage in an authentic STEM inquiry implemented in third and fourth-grade classrooms. The inquiry was designed so that students would be able to explore homelessness caused by natural disasters and design a tiny house prototype for a family in need. Participants will learn about planning and implementing a place-based and integrated STEM inquiry during this session. A major focus will be on planning and sensemaking as students learn through authentic opportunities and real-world mathematics and science. The presenter will share experiences using the Design Thinking Framework and place-based methodology as a guide for implementing and designing integrated STEM inquiries. In addition, the presenter will give specific strategies for developing problem statements to engage students in empathetic responses within STEM inquiries. The presenter will also share specific strategies for developing empathy during STEM inquiries for elementary-aged students. Participants will have the opportunity to experience key parts of the inquiry and view student examples.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Engage participants in NGSS-based engineering design challenge where participants are required to design a solution for homelessness caused by natural disasters (hurricane, floods, wildfire); 2. Learn the role of empathy in authentic STEM inquiries by using Design Thinking principles; and 3. Outline possible place-based strategies for implementing STEM inquiries in upper elementary classrooms that engage all learners in STEM.

SPEAKERS:
Jennifer Williams (Isidore Newman School: New Orleans, LA)

Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a Brand New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Since its release, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the NGSS has become an essential tool for many educators across the country. A new version titled the Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimension has been developed to not only support teachers in all states that have standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education. This new version of the Quick-Reference Guide still contains the most useful features of the original, including descriptions of the practices and the crosscutting concepts from the Framework of K-12 Science Education and K-12 progressions of the elements of all three dimensions. In addition, the new Quick-Reference Guide contains several new features that should make it even more helpful. For example, every element now has a unique code (based on the codes in the NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions) that makes it much easier to reference a particular element. In addition, there is an entire chapter devoted to the Performance Expectations. Finally, the guide also contains a number of tools for working with standards. This session will outline all of the features of the guide through the process of unpacking the crosscutting concepts to better understand how to make curriculum, instruction, and assessment more three-dimensional.

TAKEAWAYS:
A deeper understanding of the Crosscutting Concepts and how a well-designed reference guide can make it easier to unpack the three dimensions for work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Engaging with Data using CODAP in InquiryHub 3D Storylined Biology

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W196a


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Analyzing and interpreting data and using mathematical and computational reasoning are complex at the high school level, which requires students to employ correlational and causational thinking while manipulating visualizations using tools. CODAP, a product of the Concord Consortium, is designed to give students access to these powerful practices with minimal software requirements and with a mission to make data literacy accessible for all students. InquiryHub uses CODAP to provide students with agency because they can determine the variables of interest, in which to create graphical representations from the same data set. In our free, open-source program, students can work with authentic datasets from the CODAP website, data they gather, or data from professional studies. Inside our storyline instructional sequences, inquiryHub leverages CODAP as students analyze the rainfall on the Serengeti and how it correlates to wildebeest populations. In the session, participants will try out CODAP by adding multiple variables of data to answer the question, “What’s happening to large animals on the Serengeti plain?” and how to apply CODAP in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
CODAP can be used in many different three-dimensional ways to have students analyze and interpret data to make sense of phenomena while providing student agency.

SPEAKERS:
Kerri Wingert (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Did I really just flip this classroom?

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Presentation note taking worksheet

STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

The purpose of the presentation is to model how to flip a classroom from the traditional methods to more innovative methods to engage students. The participants will be able to create a deck by the end of the session. Participants will be given the background and research based strategies that Pear Deck uses to ensure that equity and inclusion are met while ensuring the seamless integration of the platform. Participants will be given the pedagogy of why this tool is needed in their classroom. Participants will be introduced to EdPuzzle and Screencastify to highlight how these tools can be used as well to flip their classrooms. A Pear Deck interactive slide will be presented to the audience. The audience will log in with the given code. As I present the audience will have my screen on their device. The audience will participate in a series of interactive activities designed to immerse them platform and give them the experience that students will have. The presentation is highly interactive with the first half of the presentation be using to interact with the platforms and the second half given for participants to explore and ask questions. The audience will be engaged with device-based activities from the beginning to the end of the presentation. The presentation style will be catch and release. I will capture their attention for some time and then I will release them to navigate through the platforms while I offer support. Attendees will learn how to create a Pear Deck, a screencastify recording and how to navigate through EdPuzzle to either create or utilize existing videos. Attendees will learn how to take the materials they are already using to flip them into a more blended learning model. The attendees will walk away with a Deck that can be used immediately in their classroom and my information to reach out to me if they have any questions during implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will walk away with the basic knowledge of how to flip their classroom and be able to implement the strategies immediately into their classroom so that they are able to increase equity and inclusion.

SPEAKERS:
Cecelia Gillam (Hahnville High School: La Place, LA)

Engineering for Us All: Exploring the "Why," "What," and "Who" of Engineering

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W194a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Baseball card lesson
Baseball card lesson (complete)
More information on e4usa
Playpump lesson
Product archaeology lesson
Robot arm lesson (with materials list)
Shoe sole sketch and design lesson
Slides from presentation

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

“You’re good at math; be an engineer.” Isn’t there more to it? Who is an engineer? Engineering helps society by solving problems. Let’s explore “why.”

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn that engineering is more than math + science and take away classroom activities addressing engineering identity, ethics, and society (not your typical engineering activities).

SPEAKERS:
Ken Reid (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

"You Can't Give, What You Don't Have": Preparing future STEM Educators with Sensemaking for Equity

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W193a


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Built on the idea that, "you can't give what you don't have" (Heibert, 2018), we have intentionally designed our STEM teacher preparation pathway using the NSTA pillar of sensemaking. The undergraduate STEM major integrates the four pillars of sensemaking across the STEM curriculum and is brought together through a seminar to support culturally sustaining STEM teaching. We will share intentionally designed curricular ideas, investigations across the various fields of study (computer science, engineering, biology, chemistry, and mathematics), field experiences, mentorship and research opportunities for our NSF Noyce Scholars and STEM majors. This will be co-presented with undergraduate students and mentor teachers so participants will get an idea of the collaboration and design across various contexts. As STEM teacher educators, we must design and model sensemaking with supports and scaffolding so that our STEM graduates are confident in designing and revising curriculum that holds sensemaking and culturally sustaining pedagogy at the core (Emdin, 2021; Emdin 2022, Paris, 2012).

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will take away specific strategies for designing STEM teacher preparation built on a foundation of sensemaking and culturally responsive pedagogy.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Rainville (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Bonnie Maur (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Sydney Worthen-Jenkins (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Nicole Hebert (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT)

The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

One of the key features of the NGSS and other standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education is the idea that a “a progression of knowledge occurs from grade band to grade band that gives students the opportunity to learn more complex material, leading to an overall understanding of science by the end of high school.” (NGSS Appendix A, p. 2) The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions has a set of 62 maps that illustrate the how the elements of the three dimensions build on each other and connect to one another. Each map focuses on a particular topic and shows the progression students are expected to make in that topic from one grade-span to the next. Arrows connecting individual elements on a map indicate that competency in one element is useful in learning to achieve the other element. Educators can use maps to deepen their understanding of the standards to plan or improve curriculum, instruction, and assessment. This session will provide participants guidance on how to read the maps in the Atlas and use this powerful tool to deepen their understanding of elements of the standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
A careful review of the connections between elements of the three dimensions can provide a clearer understanding of science standards and important guidance in planning instructional sequences to support three-dimensional teaching and learning.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Maximize the Benefits and Minimize the Challenges Associated with Embedding Engineering into the Science Curriculum using Argument-Driven Engineering

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

This session is an introduction to a new approach to STEM instruction called Argument-Driven Engineering (ADE). ADE is an instructional approach that gives students an opportunity to learn to use core concepts and processes form science, engineering, and mathematics to figure out solutions to a meaningful and authentic problem that will help make the world a better place. This instructional approach also gives students an opportunity to develop disciplinary literacy skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) because they must obtain information, share and critique potential solutions through talk, and communicate what they figured out and how they know the solution is acceptable through writing. In this session, participants will examine the potential benefits and challenges associated with embedding engineering design into science classrooms and learn how the ADE instructional model can help maximize the benefits and reduce the challenges. Participants will also have a chance to experience an example of an ADE design challenge that invites them to design a shipping and storage container for insulin and see examples of how students who completed this design challenge used science, engineering, and mathematics content and processes to figure out how to keep the insulin cold for long periods of time. Participants will also learn about how this new approach was developed through three years of classroom-based research by a team of researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and how well ADE instructional materials are aligned with the TEKS for science, mathematics, CTE, and ELA.

TAKEAWAYS:
• How to give students an opportunity to learn how to use concepts and processes from science, engineering, and mathematics to design a solution to an authentic problem that will help make the world a better place.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Crash Science: When Physics Meets Biology

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Use innovative video-assisted STEM activities, demonstrations, award-winning videos, and behind-the-crash-tests tours to teach the science of car crashes. Visit classroom.iihs.org for more information.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants learn how to incorporate culminating STEM design challenges (Project Pedestrian Sensors and Egg-Carrying Paper Car Crash) into their curriculum to promote student awareness and understanding of how engineering and technology are used to build safer vehicles.

SPEAKERS:
Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

Using Climate Science Storylines to Anchor a High School Chemistry Class

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Come explore creative storylines for integrating up-to-date, research-driven climate science into high school Chemistry courses.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Climate-related storylines provide powerful frameworks for students to learn fundamental chemistry core ideas and reinforce understandings of crosscutting concepts and science and engineering practices; 2. The wealth of Earth-orbiting NASA satellite data now available in real time provides us with an unprecedented understanding of the science of climate change and also provides many opportunities for student experiential learning; and The latest advances in climate modeling can allow all students to both see the inequitable impacts that humans are currently having on Earth systems and build a sense of hope in how future changes in human practices can reverse current impact trends.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Wysession (Washington University in St. Louis: Saint Louis, MO)

Developing school-based science teacher leadership through a collaborative learning community.

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W181b


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Participants will be introduced to an ongoing partnership between Chicago Public Schools and Loyola University Chicago in which 40 K-8 teachers participated in a Master Teacher Leadership Cohort to support the rollout of a newly-adopted science curriculum. The cohort supports teachers in becoming leaders in their schools and across the district, ensuring a greater impact on underrepresented students by removing barriers to appropriate grade-level content and high-quality instruction. We will begin by highlighting activities from the cohort that develop teacher knowledge of the NGSS and best practices in science instruction, including learning cycle action plans and other strategies to make practice public and engage in collaborative problem-solving (20 min). We will then share strategies for the development of teacher leadership, including case study work, leadership self-assessment and goal-setting, and leadership breakout discussions, where teachers were invited to share individual areas of expertise in science teacher leadership. (15 min) We will then engage participants in preparing for two of the cohort activities: an instructional strategy share-out (“pineapple share”) and leadership breakout discussions. (15 min) We will end with thoughts from a teacher leader in the cohort about how to recruit, retain, and engage teachers in this type of community. (10 min)

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave this session with the tools they can use to develop collaboration, leadership, and high-quality science instruction among science teacher leaders.

SPEAKERS:
Andre Botello (Chicago Public Schools: Chicago, IL), Julie Jacobi (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL), Allison Grandberry (Chicago Public Schools: Chicago, IL), Kayla Cherry (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL)

Global Conversations: International Film Festival

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W186c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session will showcase lessons from around the world focusing on the exchange of ideas and networking. Come view a film created using videos from teachers around the globe, and posters while engaging with other teachers looking to network internationally.

TAKEAWAYS:
This session will showcase lessons from around the world focusing on the exchange of ideas and networking. Come view a film created using videos from teachers around the globe, and posters while engaging with other teachers looking to network internationally.

SPEAKERS:
Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

Installation Science Exhibits as Assessment Options

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W187c


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

To help develop more scientifically curious and literate students, we use scientific literature or documentaries to engage students in developing the NGSS science practices. Students find an interesting topic, generate a question, collect and analyze data and then develop a Science Installation that communicates their learning to the greater community. Our most recent class project had students study how to grow food in a simulated Mars environment with the conditions controlled by student programmed raspberry pis. High school students organized 6th graders to do hands on data collection. They created a 10x12 foot exhibit that looked like a Martian landscape and highlighted the equipment they used with the plants still growing. The display included QR codes to communicate data and research using student-created videos, infographics, and data tables. Other installations include a monochromatic yellow room where everything looks grey and allowed observers to learn about the properties of light and the ways light energy is used in photosynthesis, the way it can be used to promote electrons, and the way it produces color. Other exhibits include sound waves and a history or music and musical instruments, the chemistry of color, and an environmental study of our use of carbon.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to guide students in the reading of scientific literature or the watching of documentaries in order to generate an authentic question and project. (How can we develop the capacity to farm on Mars? How does yellow monochromatic light produce the absence of color (an episode of Abstract, What can we learn about pollen structure from 3D printed files from Bayer’s agricultural division?) Participants will review a process to take the question and generate an authentic study that transcends a single class, grade, or discipline. (Students in 11th grade worked with students in 6th grade to test growing plants under controlled conditions that simulated Mars. Students in art and physics classes explored the properties of light and created a light-based art exhibit with science lessons on QR codes) Participants will explore a template for guiding students through the creation of an installation/exhibit that creatively shows the question, their experiment, their analysis, and potential solutions or conclusions in a creative and community-informing way. The exhibit is similar to an art installation with QR codes and experiment/study artifacts presented in a museum like scenario.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Helfant (Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School: Saint Louis, MO)

The STEM of PBL

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
_Main_Course.pdf
http://bit.ly/STEMPBLQA
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1c38TeuqPSC-vS8GLiVXQH9GzI7g0sjbx/view?usp=sharing
STEM PBL in action
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HyFVEpZyEY
STEM PBL in action
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
Guiding questions
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
The Engineering Design Process/Journal Reflections
Projects VS PBL.docx
What Is PBL_ARTICLE.pdf
Why Is PBL Important_ARTICLE.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Participants will understand how to develop and effectively implement STEM curriculum units that include project based activities and performance based assessments. Participants will learn to help students answer complex questions and develop solutions for challenges and real-world problems. They will also assist students with extending and refining their acquired knowledge to routinely analyze and solve problems. By the end of this session: 1) Participants will gain a clear and coherent understanding of what a STEM PBL is and how it works. 2) Participants will be able to identify and create effective essential questions. 3) Participants will be able to identify and apply the components of a STEM PBL. 4) Understand how STEM PBL’s will impact instruction for participants and students. Agenda: What is PBL? Why is it important? How does a STEM PBL Work? How to effectively integrate journal reflections. Ways to Implement STEM PBL’s

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to effectively implement STEM PBL’s (Project Based Learning) by integrating the components of STEM and PBL in order to grow students' capacity for creativity, fun, and back-loaded learning in a STEM context.

SPEAKERS:
Adero Carter (Clayton County Public Schools: Jonesboro, GA)

Evaluating STEM Curricula with Equity and Inclusivity in Mind

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Explore EiE’s curriculum design principles for inclusivity and NSTA’s sensemaking pillars as tools to evaluate curricula for inclusivity and equity.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave this session with a framework for evaluating curricula with equity and inclusivity in mind.

SPEAKERS:
Diana Christopherson (Museum of Science, Boston: Boston, MA)

Data and Storylines: The key to helping all students become STEM literate

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Data and Storylines
Resources for Teachers
Resource Folder
Resource Folder

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

News bulletins on social media and news sites contain topics that students need to understand now so that they can make informed decisions for their world today and tomorrow. STEM literacy is crucial to learners struggling to understand the multitude of information bombarding them through television, social media and the internet. Students in K-12 must become STEM literate so that they can identify, understand and solve problems in the world around them. STEM Literacy promotes innovative thinking and creativity as well as collaboration, problem solving, and most importantly, critical thinking. Today’s challenges need answers from our students but first they need to understand issues including climate change, space travel, robotics. By using real-world applications of scientific data and storylines, students become critical consumers, problem-solvers, and change-makers. Students who are STEM literate will be able to think critically and act responsibly about issues that impact them. In this session, lessons and strategies will be shared with teachers to inspire and to support their students as they develop STEM literacy skills. These lessons will encourage students to explore, explain and develop solutions to real phenomena and solve real problems.

TAKEAWAYS:
Three Takeaways: 1) Teachers will become familiar with technology, literacy and adaptive learning for middle school and high school students. 2) Teachers will be introduced to the free materials available that align with NGSS standards. 3) Teachers will be given ideas on how to incorporate these lessons in class

SPEAKERS:
Diane Ripollone (Cardinal Gibbons High School: Raleigh, NC), Kathy Biernat (Educational Consultant: Franklin, WI)

Strategies to Improve Communications in Inclusive Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W181c


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Improve inclusive classroom dynamics between teachers, families, and students by reflecting on disability model perspectives, identifying barriers to collaboration, and determining effective avenues of communication.

TAKEAWAYS:
The triangle of inclusion presents pathways that can be used by administrators and teachers to recognize and overcome barriers faced within the inclusive classroom and includes strategies such as early open communications, student advocacy, professional learning opportunities, and mentorships.

SPEAKERS:
Nicole Wack (East Penn School District: Emmaus, PA)

Executive Function Supports for Creating Inclusive Science Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W179a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
EF Supports for Inclusive Science Classrooms Presentation PDF
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1TUPMxotRYq0ZsboPp7i1jxMVKthb0vnv?usp=sharing
NSTA Presentation 7_21 (1).pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Come learn about simple, applicable strategies to support your students' executive function skills in the science classroom, with an emphasis on project planning, organization, flexible thinking, and time management.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will identify the educational impact of the 11 main executive functions, as well as learn concrete strategies for supporting their students in both general and special education settings.

SPEAKERS:
Krista Northcutt (New Way Academy: Phoenix, AZ)

Studying the Wright Brothers and Testing Airfoils: Bringing STEM into the History Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W184a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

As a high school Engineering teacher, I'm passionate about the effects project-based learning can have on students' ability to engage with classroom material. I don't believe that hands-on STEM work needs to be limited to the science classroom and want to share a project that has been done in a freshman History class and could be adapted to incorporate other topics. Using online 3D modeling software, a 3D printer, and a wind generator, students studying the Wright brothers drew their own historically significant airfoils (like The Spirit of St. Louis and the Enola Gay), 3D printed them, and tested them. Students learned airfoil terminology, like camber and chord, and used airfoil ratios to create their scale models. While testing, we discussed the variations of the wings and why engineers might value payload capacity over speed based on the plane's use. My hope is that this presentation can encourage teachers to bring STEM concepts into other curricular departments as a way to demonstrate the types of connections students can make when they're working hands-on. This presentation will detail the steps of the project, materials needed, and highlight the challenges and lessons we've learned over the four years we've run this unit.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will see an example of how a STEM teacher brought project based learning into a freshman History class and how that project has evolved and expanded over four years. We will present the curriculum and materials needed for this week-long project for others to employ at their own schools.

SPEAKERS:
Abigail Mills (Woodberry Forest School: Woodberry Forest, VA)

An Analysis of How an Inquiry-Based Professional Development Informed the Instructional Practices of Science Teachers

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W186b


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

This study explored how Project MISE, an inquiry-based professional development, impacted the instructional practices of science teachers.

TAKEAWAYS:
Inquiry-based instructional practices

SPEAKERS:
Emily Jackson-Osagie (Southern University and A&M College: Baton Rouge, LA)

Expanding Participation and Success in STEM Teaching Through Partnerships

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Ideas and concrete strategies for building collaborative, generative partnerships with community groups, nonprofits, preK–12 schools, museums, and community colleges in order to transform the STEM ecosystem and preservice teachers' futures will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will: 1. hear from different partners about the generative ways we have collaborated to increase diversity in our STEM teacher preparation program; 2. engage in discussion and planning next steps for reaching out to a potential collaborative partner; and 3. learn about the ways in which preservice STEM Noyce Scholars have strengthened their STEM Identity and have been prepared to design culturally sustaining curricula and classrooms that integrate sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Sydney Worthen-Jenkins (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Nicole Hebert (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Bonnie Maur (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Kristin Rainville (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT)

Join Us for the Elementary STEM Showcase!

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W183a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Exploring Energy Transfer in Ecosystems with SageModeler
Mars Mission Specialist.pdf
Mindfulness Jar recipe
Touch-Talk-Text Practices that support reading and science instruction

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Wander your way through 30 different STEM stations to learn about resources, lessons, and teaching strategies to incorporate more STEM into your school and classroom. This farmer's market–type event brings together educators, authors, researchers, and leaders in early childhood through fifth-grade STEM education. Leave with a mindful of great ideas and be inspired!

TAKEAWAYS:
Pick up great ideas and be inspired during this farmer's market–type event.

SPEAKERS:
Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Heather Pacheco-Guffrey (Bridgewater State University: Bridgewater, MA), Lauren Burrow (Stephen F. Austin State University: Nacogdoches, TX), Susan Erickson (Country School: Weston, MA), Sara Nelson (Iowa State University: Ames, IA), Constance Beecher (Iowa State University: Ames, IA), Elizabeth Dethloff (Robert R. Shaw Center for STEAM: Katy, TX), Christine Preston (The University of Sydney: Sydney, Australia), Catherine Scott (Coastal Carolina University: Conway, SC), Kristin Cook (Bellarmine University: Louisville, KY), Richard Cox, Jr. (Winthrop University: Rock Hill, SC), Annette Venegas (Kent School District: Kent, WA), Juliette Guarino Berg (The Town School: New York, NY), Katie Morrison (University Child Development School: Seattle, WA), Wendi Laurence (Create-osity: Park City, UT), Katrina Kmak (Park City Library: Park City, UT), Brittnie Hecht (Park City Library: Park City, UT), Diana Lockwood (Author & Executive Director: , 0), Godwyn Morris (Dazzling Discoveries / Skill Mill NYC: New York, NY), Bridget Miller (University of South Carolina: Columbia, SC), Christie Martin (University of South Carolina: Columbia, SC), Rebecca Kurson (Collegiate School: New York, NY), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Shelly Counsell (The University of Memphis: Memphis, TN), Belle Akers (Convent & Stuart Hall's Schools of the Sacred Heart: San Francisco, CA), Kathleen Tate (American Public University System: Charles Town, WV), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS), Bill Burton (The Lamplighter School: Dallas, TX), Barbara Bromley (Hazelwood Elementary School: Lynnwood, WA), Kim Stilwell (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Nancy McIntyre (Robotics Education & Competition Foundation: Greenville, TX), Shari Haug (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL), Jane Savatski (Janet Berry Elementary School: Appleton, WI), Katrina Pavlik (Deputy Executive Director: Oakbrook Terrace, IL), Mitchell Rosenberg (Kinderlab Robotics, Inc.: Waltham, MA), Tiffany Leones (Digital Promise: Washington, DC), Beth Dykstra VanMeeteren (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA), Danielle Scharen (North Carolina State University: Raleigh, NC), Frances Hamilton (The University of Alabama in Huntsville: Huntsville, AL), Jennifer Williams (Isidore Newman School: New Orleans, LA), Anne Lowry (Aleph Academy: Reno, NV)

Built for Success: Utilizing Teams to Improve Informal Science Opportunities

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W178a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
NSTA Presentation - Brian Kutsch

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Informal science learning opportunities can be so much more than a trip to the zoo or museum. The resources available at informal learning organizations can greatly strengthen or supplement those at formal learning institutions. Collaboration is key to achieving such results. In many cases, those partnerships are strengthened through the creation of formalized teams or committees. Quite often, that’s where the struggle begins. Frequently, teams are not structured to react quickly to changes and they don’t mature in a manner that provides stability as they age. Whether starting from scratch or reenergizing an existing team, it’s important to recruit members with the right skills and resources, engage them effectively and layout a structure that allows them to succeed… even during times when you can’t be there to lead them. The guidance discussed in this session will provide attendees with successful tips and K-12 examples that they can take with them as they improve informal science in their communities.

TAKEAWAYS:
Tips on building teams from scratch, reorganizing existing teams and laying the path for continued success.

SPEAKERS:
Brian Kutsch (National Science Teaching Association, eCYBERMISSION: No City, No State)

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W180


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will: 1. participate in a discussion on defining STEM based professional development; 2. have an opportunity to view strategies that supports inquiry in science and 3. be able to view research and data that supports the impact of STEM based professional development on achievement.

SPEAKERS:
Takisha Gastile (University of Houston-Clear Lake: Houston, TX)

Providing actionable feedback to build students’ self-reflection skills

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W181a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Actionable Feedback.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

How many teacher comments on student work are left unread? Or, even if they are read, how useful are they to the student? Can the student positively internalize the feedback and use it to improve their work? Chances are the answer is no! But it doesn’t have to be this way! During this session, participants will learn more effective strategies for giving actionable feedback and methods to help their students utilize feedback to improve their work. First we’ll learn how to ask questions in student feedback and how differently questions are internalized by the student. For example, consider the difference between, “I don’t understand what you mean here,” and “Can you explain in more detail what you meant in this statement?” Then we’ll discover how to make sure teachers' feedback is read and used by students to improve their work. By making self reflection a formalized step in the learning process, teachers provide students opportunities to practice this important skill! Participants will receive a worksheet with feedback tips and tricks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Several methods that can be applied immediately in the classroom, providing feedback encouraging students to be self reflective of their own work.

SPEAKERS:
Regina Borriello (Clifton High School: Edison, NJ)

A Model for Recruiting and Retaining Hispanic Students in STEM Fields

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W181b


Show Details

Hispanic students are a growing minority in school systems. However, the number of Hispanic students earning certificates and degrees in STEM fields at the post-secondary level is far below that of other students. To address this problem, Hispanic students and their families need to be introduced to STEM subjects (including hands-on activities) and STEM professionals (including professors and students majoring in STEM fields) beginning in elementary school. This communication and relationship building needs to continue in both middle school and high school. It then culminates with dual enrollment classes, mentorships, and internships at the community college level. In this presentation, you will be introduced to the RHiTA (recruiting Hispanics to achieve) program at Walters State Community College and the Hispanic STEM engagement pipeline. You will hear about the successes and the failures of this program and the plans for the future. You will be given tips and advice to create a similar program at your college.

TAKEAWAYS:
Develop and implement a pipeline from elementary school to community college in STEM subjects to engage Hispanic students.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Moore-Roberts (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN), Elesha Goodfriend (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN)

STEM-Inquiry-SEL Connections

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W186a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
SEL-PBL Session Slides
SEL-PBL Toolkit

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Explore connections between inquiry, project-based learning (PBL), and social-emotional learning (SEL) through a new essential practices guide. Learn strategies that build SEL skills, making PBL accessible to all students.

TAKEAWAYS:
In order to make project-based learning accessible for all students, the development of social-emotional skills must be intentionally planned and explicitly taught.

SPEAKERS:
Kristana Rogers (RTI International: Durham, NC)

That doesn't look like a science fair!

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W179a


STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

This session is designed to help teachers deepen their understanding of the effective and practical strategies needed to facilitate a successful science fair competition or symposium in either a face-to-face or hybrid environment. Participants will be provided with a variety of instructional strategies and free curriculum materials to ensure that all students have access to a social learning platform that will encourage opportunities to collaborate with peers and mentors through intentional planning. The instructional strategies used in this presentation will promote student engagement, differentiation, and scientific understanding to help form a more inclusive learning environment within the classroom and within the district community.

TAKEAWAYS:
--Participants will experience a variety of impactful instructional strategies that promote authentic scientific research and presentation to promote access to equitable future opportunities for students regarding college and/or career endeavors

SPEAKERS:
Angela McMurry (The Ohio Academy of Science: Dublin, OH)

Incorporating the 3 Rs of Animal Use in High School Science Classes

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

A cross-disciplinary team of teachers, subject matter experts, and curriculum developers have designed resources and materials to facilitate teaching students about the use of animals in scientific research in the United States, as well as Russell and Burch’s 3 Rs principles of replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal use. The materials, which are aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, are geared toward high school science students. The modules can be taught separately or in combination, giving educators flexibility to choose specific content areas to share and explore with their students. During the session, we will present two learning plans: one that introduces students to the 3 Rs principles and how animals are used in scientific research, and another that covers the 3 Rs principles in more depth. We will share information, including teaching plans, learning materials, and performance assessment tasks associated with the curriculum, with session attendees.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will have an opportunity to learn more about the content and activities covered in two lesson plans focused on the use of animals in scientific research in the United States and the 3 Rs principles. Sample lesson plans and associated learning materials, including presentations, articles, and worksheets, will be shared with attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Pam Osenkowski (National Anti-Vivisection Society: Chicago, IL)

Integrating CS into Science Storylines

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W176c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Science teachers at Lindblom Math and Science Academy in Chicago Public Schools have worked with Northwestern University’s CT-STEM department to develop computational thinking in science units aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards. The goal is for students to understand and apply computational thinking practices in their science classrooms to help make sense of phenomena or problems, analyze data, use models and develop explanations. Units, built by teachers, are designed to cover core science concepts in physics, chemistry, and biology. This program allows teachers to work with CT-STEM members to develop new simulations or other CT activities that work best in the unit. This was developed based on teacher need, when simulations didn’t exist to address the big ideas. Integration of NetLogo models, SageModeler, NetTango, and other data analysis activities are used to help students make real world connections. These tools allow students to learn and apply basic computer science ideas and skills as well as the 3-D of NGSS. Developed unit topics include: stoichiometry, climate change, gas laws, and energy. These units are available for public use and can be easily modified on the CT-STEM platform for teachers to use.

TAKEAWAYS:
Overview of how teachers integrated Computational Thinking into science units and how to access units for Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Earth Science

SPEAKERS:
Carole Namowicz (Lindblom Math and Science Academy: Chicago, IL), Lauren Levites (Lindblom Math and Science Academy: Chicago, IL)

Visual-based science education as see through the eyes of a neurologist

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W185a


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

I plan to show examples of narrated, evolving images. I plan to show images of neuranatomy. I plan to show the results of a student performance using visual-based teaching. I plan to discuss other tips for effective teaching.

TAKEAWAYS:
Why students learn more in less time by viewing narrated, evolving images than by reading a textbook.

SPEAKERS:
Sheldon Margulies, M.D. (Fascinating Education: Silver Spring, MD)

The Student Design Guild

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W187a


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

During the pandemic, STEM leaders took on the challenge of connecting PK-5 students with each other in inclusive community events that focused on expanding access to STEM learning. The Student Design Guild (SDG) is a program bringing students and families together in a Covid-safe environment. SDG had three goals in mind: continue to provide STEM outreach for elementary students, provide a sense of community at a time when schools looked different and new, and provide ways for students to make sense of the pandemic. The SDG united students through a common need and engaged them in STEM learning. Through the design thinking process (a human-centered problem-solving process) and STEM stations, the guild developed opportunities for students that included designing, creating, building, iterating and sharing, all to lay a foundation for developing essential skills necessary for secondary education / work-force readiness. Participants will -learn how to design their own district/school-based Student Design Guild -have access to a model for creating a streamlined district-wide program that expands access and participation in STEM learning view design thinking as a STEM practice -view design thinking as a STEM practice -receive a district-wide student design challenge and a variety of turn-key STEM Stations

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn about one district's model for creating district-wide programming that expands access and participation in STEM learning and understand how that model can be adapted to fit the needs of the user. Understand how to use the design thinking process as a STEM practice and receive a rubric for using design thinking. Have access to a district-wide design challenge and a variety of turn-key STEM Stations for students.

SPEAKERS:
Kristen Brohm (Innovation Center of St. Vrain Valley Schools: Longmont, CO), Colin Rickman (Innovation Lab Coordinator: Longmont, CO)

Planning More Accessible Science Lessons with Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Claims and evidence.jpg
Debate.jpg
Final Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pptx
Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pdf
Speaking like a scientist.pdf - Inv. Part 1.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

In this presentation we will start with an existing basic physical science lesson that uses disciplinary core ideas on electricity, the engineering practice of making a model by constructing a basic electrical circuit, and the cross-cutting concept of cause and effect (closing the circuit starts current flow and turns on the light). We will then modify it using Universal Design for Learning (UDL) so it is more accessible, especially for students with disabilities. UDL encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson and gives students several ways to acquire the lesson knowledge, Multiple means of expression allows the students several choices in how they can “show what they know” and multiple means of engagement offers learners offers appropriate challenges to get students interested and motivated. Planning or modifying lessons using UDL not only makes lessons more accessible, but it also makes lessons more engaging for all students in inclusive classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
1) Universal Design for Learning (UDL) encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson. Use of UDL makes lessons more engaging for all students. 2) Applying UDL (Universal Design for Learning) will make the lesson more accessible, especially for students with special needs. 3) You may start with a lesson you already have. It is not necessary to develop a lesson from scratch when using UDL.

SPEAKERS:
Mary O'Donnell (The Help Group: State College, PA), Gargi Adhikari (Holland Brook School: Whitehouse Station, NJ)

Promoting Equity for Girls Through Purposeful STEM Clubs

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W187b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
NSTA Chicago Presentation.pptx

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Learn how to assist educators in facilitating purposeful STEM clubs for elementary girls, focusing on strategies promoting female student achievement, confidence, and interest in science.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Strategies to establish and facilitate STEM clubs that are fun, develop collaboration, actively combat stereotypes, and provide students with female role models in the STEM community; 2. An exploration of options for club formats and in-class applications, possible equity protocols, as well as a discussion of potential barriers and possible solutions for educators; and 3. Tools and resources for further research and strategies.

SPEAKERS:
David Rosengrant (University of South Florida St. Petersburg: St. Petersburg, FL), Nicole Caltabellotta (Mt. Vernon Elementary: St. Petersburg, FL)

Energizing Students for Greater Energy Savings

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W175c


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Energy is the second largest expenditure in American schools. Managing energy use in a school setting is difficult without having students, faculty, and staff engaged and actively participating in a management program. This presentation will serve as the steppingstone for how to conduct one’s own educational energy audit in their classroom and school building. The hands-on investigations turn the school building into a living laboratory to explore energy efficiency, monitor energy use, and decide on the best behavioral changes based on data collected. The lessons introduce students to the concepts of energy, energy consumption, economic and environmental effects of the energy industry and its consumers, and the difference between conservation and efficiency. Activities encourage the development of cooperative learning, math, science, comparison and contrast, public speaking, and critical thinking skills. By engaging students in an energy management program, you have hundreds of enthusiastic mini energy managers ready to help identify things like broken water fountains, leaky doors or windows, inappropriate lighting use, vampire loads, and unwanted temperature variations within their own building. Students take ownership of their school and take better care of it while leading their peers to be conscientious users of energy. They learn these skills to bring back to their home and community.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn hands-on activities that introduce students to the ways in which we use energy in the home and at school while helping teach students to take ownership and lead their peers to be conscientious users of energy.

SPEAKERS:
Cori Nelson (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA)

Making Group Work Fair: The Potential Pitfalls of Student Peer Evaluations

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Although group projects have been shown to increase learning and cooperation, bullying can sneak into student peer evaluations. Examples and alternatives to ghosting presented.

TAKEAWAYS:
Science classrooms are a great place for group projects to enhance learning, but students may unwittingly be ghosted from their group, ultimately making them seem like they are not a team player. We as teachers must be diligent against bullying/ghosting.

SPEAKERS:
Diane Huelskamp (Wright State University-Lake Campus: Celina, OH)

Lessons Learned: Strategies to Address Invisible Illnesses and Health-Impairment Disabilities in STEM Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W179a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Resources and strategies to support P–12 and postsecondary students in STEM classrooms who have invisible illnesses/ health-impairment disabilities will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will get an overview of resources and strategies that address the need for safe and equitable learning environments for P–12 and postsecondary students with invisible disabilities/ health-impairment illnesses in STEM classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Grim-Hunter (Chicago State University: Chicago, IL)

From Failure to a Science Distinction in Two Years

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W185d



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
From Failure to Success some suggested strategies

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Using STEM education to move a science department from failure to distinction in two academic years is possible. Artifacts used will be shared in addition to research-based strategies that were employed during the process, from failure to a science distinction. STEM education is vital for the success of all students. STEM instruction allows the teacher to make learning connected and more relevant. This presentation will be focused on a teacher’s standpoint and an administrator’s lens. Strategies used mainly focused on employing higher-order thinking skills for both students and teachers. As a Science Department, we were “In it to win”. Teacher standpoint. The foundation of instruction of the department was based on the inquiry approach method that involved ESL and Special education faculty support during all planning sessions. Well-structured PLCs were vital vertically and horizontally. From the lens of an administrator Setting high expectations for PLCs and department meeting is critical. The approach must always be “It’s not another department meeting”: Instructional mechanics were self-checked by using Swivl, and frequent casual ‘I Noticed’ walkthroughs improved instruction. BOY Goal setting for student performance must be strategically tied to all major assessments. Creating a culture of student-centered learning and instructional guidance for teachers is the cohesive force that paves the road to success.

TAKEAWAYS:
STEM education is vital for the success of all students. STEM instruction allows the teacher to make learning connected and more relevant. This presentation will be focused on a classroom teacher’s standpoint and from an administrator’s lens how the road to success can be paved strategically.

SPEAKERS:
Jean Langevine (Galveston ISD: Galveston, TX)

Build a K–12 STEAM Pipeline Through Family STEAM Night

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W180


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Engage students, families, and the community in STEAM through Family STEAM Nights in order to equitably build understanding and interest in STEAM.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to create, recruit, and implement a Family STEAM Night to engage students, families, and the community in STEAM.

SPEAKERS:
McKenna Serowka (Lake Zurich High School: Lake Zurich, IL)

CMU CS Academy: Free Python Courses and Teacher Tools for the CS and STEM Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W175a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
CMU CS Academy Free Python Courses for Middle School and High School

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Come learn about a free CS curriculum for teachers with Carnegie Mellon University's CS Academy: Creative and Exiting Tools for STEM Classrooms Using Python.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to create your accounts and the different types of Python courses available, all free of charge. You can use the curriculum immediately upon account creation for small projects or entire classes.

SPEAKERS:
Sofia De Jesus (Carnegie Mellon University: Pittsburgh, PA)

Inspiration to Fruition

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Inspiration to Fruition

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Inspiration to Fruition provides any educator with a game plan on how to take an idea and available resources and create a project that enhances the student experience and skills.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. A template for designing a grassroots STEM or PBL project; 2. Top 10 tips on how to make managing the project actually manageable; and 3. Proof that trusting one's intuition to build a project based on an inspirational event can bring to fruition an amazing experience for students.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Hartings (Indian Hill Middle School: Cincinnati, OH), Jessica Brown (Teacher: cincinnati, OH)

Digging Deeper into the Data with an Adapted CER Framework

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

This session focuses on improved outcomes for students’ written science explanations when including data description prompts and instructional facilitation to adapt the CER framework.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn about the importance of a preliminary step of incorporating data descriptions when utilizing the CER framework to guide students’ written explanations and reasoning of data visualization.

SPEAKERS:
Andrea Drewes (Rider University: Lawrenceville, NJ)

STEM Engagement and Collaboration in Jurassic Proportions

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W187a


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Explore the many ways dinosaurs and paleontology can be integrated into STEM curricula to attract all learners. Resources and collaboration ideas will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will walk away with a plethora of hands-on ideas and resources (including children's literature) relating to dinosaurs, paleontology, and community resources to help inspire all learners in their contexts.

SPEAKERS:
Catherine Pangan (Butler University: Indianapolis, IN), Becky Wolfe (The Children's Museum of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

Building a Better ADI Understanding: Using Student-Created Avatars to Explain Past Scientist Experiences with ADI

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W176a


STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

This presentation reviews students researching and presenting on past ADI events in science through the creation of scientist avatars.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. This session highlights the use of a classroom-tested assignment where students are asked to create a personal avatar where they are pretending to be the actual scientist; and 2. The assignment works well to show actual ADI events that explain how science changes over time.

SPEAKERS:
William Sumrall (The University of Mississippi: University, MS)

Integrating Computer Science into Science Courses Without Losing Your Mind

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W175a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Orban_nsta22.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Computer science CAN be integrated into high school science classes. Here are some ideas from the STEMcoding Project!

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will work on three "STEMcoding" activities on: 1. climate change with connection to spreadsheets; 2. orbital motion for Earth science; and 3. the first of the "physics of video games" activities.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Orban (The Ohio State University at Marion: Marion, OH)

Approaches to Assessment and Grading that Support Student Sensemaking

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

As educators shift their teaching practice to align with the Framework for K-12 Science and the NGSS, they face various challenges and barriers. One pressing challenge is how to align their new approach to teaching and lea