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2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Wednesday, July 20
8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
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SC-1: Developing and Using Three-Dimensional Assessment Tasks to Support NGSS Instruction

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Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Hyde Park A/B

Ticket Price:

  • $75 earlybird
  • $100 advance

If you have not yet registered for the conference, you may purchase tickets when you register online.

Please note that if you are already registered for the conference and wish to purchase this ticket, click the "add to cart" button above.

Assessment tasks for NGSS classrooms are different from the typical tasks that require students to recall what they know. A Framework for K–12 Science Education and the NGSS call for assessment tasks that ask students to use and apply the three dimensions of science proficiency: disciplinary core ideas, scientific and engineering practices, and crosscutting concepts. With three-dimensional tasks, the expectation is that students will use and apply the three dimensions of science proficiency together to make sense of phenomena or solve problems.

In this session, we focus on designing three-dimensional assessment tasks for classroom use with an emphasis on assessment for teaching and learning. A good assessment task should provide actionable information of value to teachers and their students. Importantly, it should provide insight into how students are building toward an NGSS performance expectation.

How can we use performance expectations to construct assessment tasks that can be used during instruction? Participants will learn an approach for designing three-dimensional assessment tasks and explore how to use them formatively in classrooms to help students build toward the performance expectations.

Participants will also be able to preorder our assessment book Creating and Using Instructionally Supportive Assessments in NGSS Classrooms.

Takeaways: Participants will learn: 1. what is meant by three-dimensional assessment; 2. how to design classroom-based assessment tasks aligned with the NGSS; and 3. how to make use of formative assessment tasks to support instruction.

Speakers

Joseph Krajcik (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI), Christopher Harris (K-12 Alliance/WestEd: Redwood City, CA)

Wednesday, July 20
11:45 AM - 12:45 PM
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Lunch: Elements of Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Regency Ballroom

By Invitation Only

Shifting from traditional professional development to curriculum-based professional learning is a simple concept but complex to design and execute well. At its core, it means teachers experience the same kind of inquiry-based learning we expect them to provide their students. Learn more about a Carnegie Corporation of New York report, The Elements, which identifies a core set of research-based actions, approaches, and enabling conditions that effective schools and systems have put in place to reinforce and amplify the power of high-quality curriculum and skillful teaching.

Takeaways: 1. Examine beliefs and assumptions regarding the relationship between high-quality instructional materials, curriculum-based professional learning and student success 2. Gain understanding of the foundation for The Elements, a challenge paper from Carnegie Corporation of New York 3. Learn from science practitioners whose successful curriculum implementation efforts are grounded in the elements and essentials.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Wednesday, July 20
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
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SC-2: Supporting Teachers and Students in the Science Classroom Using NSTA’s Instructional Coaching Tools and Protocols

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Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Hyde Park A/B

Ticket Price:

  • $75 earlybird
  • $100 advance

If you have not yet registered for the conference, you may purchase tickets when you register online.

Please note that if you are already registered for the conference and wish to purchase this ticket, click the "add to cart" button above.

This workshop is designed for instructional coaches and leaders who want to support their teachers in making the instructional shifts required by three-dimensional science standards. Participants will receive NSTA’s suite of instructional coaching tools and gain experience using the protocols and providing feedback.

Takeaways: 1. Become familiar with a suite of instructional coaching tools and protocols; 2. Gain experience using the instructional coaching tools and protocols; and 3. Identify ways to use the tools to provide feedback to teachers and document growth over time.

Speakers

Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/M85g4eNS_sCs_E

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a Brand New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

Since its release, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the NGSS has become an essential tool for many educators across the country. A new version titled the Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimension has been developed to not only support teachers in all states that have standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education. This new version of the Quick-Reference Guide still contains the most useful features of the original, including descriptions of the practices and the crosscutting concepts from the Framework of K-12 Science Education and K-12 progressions of the elements of all three dimensions. In addition, the new Quick-Reference Guide contains several new features that should make it even more helpful. For example, every element now has a unique code (based on the codes in the NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions) that makes it much easier to reference a particular element. In addition, there is an entire chapter devoted to the Performance Expectations. Finally, the guide also contains a number of tools for working with standards. This session will outline all of the features of the guide through the process of unpacking the crosscutting concepts to better understand how to make curriculum, instruction, and assessment more three-dimensional.

Takeaways: A deeper understanding of the Crosscutting Concepts and how a well-designed reference guide can make it easier to unpack the three dimensions for work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

Speakers

Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Universal Design for Learning (UDL) - An Effective Approach to Ensuring an Inclusive Science Classroom

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines are a tool that can be used to design learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners (CAST, 2018). Instructional designers and teachers can use these principles to create learning environments that reduce barriers to access for all students, while keeping in mind the learning goals of the lesson. The three guiding principles of UDL are engagement, representation, and action and expression. In this session educators will be provided with examples of these principles in action in sample materials from OpenSciEd and classroom videos. In these examples, participating will identify how the materials have been purposefully designed with multiple avenues for engagement, representation, and action and expression. Additionally, they will identify the built-in supports for teachers to highlight student assets and to address potential barriers to learning for their local student population. Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

Takeaways: Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

Speakers

Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Using tools to sense and interact with the environment

McCormick Place - W193a

After learning about computational thinking, participants will apply the framework to determine where students engage in computational thinking within the activity. Participants will engage in activities where students engineer as part of the investigations. Participants will be able to use a pre-programmed microcontroller (loaned by the presenters) to experience 3 different short investigations each tied to a different phenomenon. 1) Does angle matter? How does the angle of the collector affect how warm it is? Using the microcontroller and lamps participants will collect data to build a model that explains why the tilt of the Earth creates different seasons. 2) Transparent, Translucent, and Opaque. When working in a greenhouse, different materials can be used to cover the greenhouse. Which is the best material for your area? Using the light level sensor on the microcontroller, participants test different materials to recommend their uses when designing a greenhouse. 3) Making an alarm - using the microcontroller accelerometer sensor, participants arm an alarm and see how the accelerometer works in three dimensions. Participants will be provided printed copies of the lesson plans and how to engage students with using the microcontrollers. Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment brought is necessary to participate in this workshop.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn (1) Microcontrollers are small computers that come with several integrated sensors. Their functionality makes them useful for both investigations and engineering projects. Some of the basic functionality of different microcontrollers (2) One definition of computation thinking is how to use computers to solve problems. Computational thinking activities that connect students to everyday phenomena. The development of algorithms or the decomposition of problems into simple steps are just two examples of processes associated with computation thinking. It is a powerful problem-solving technique that is used in the modern world (3) How engineering tasks provide opportunities for student sensemaking

Speakers

Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Using tools to sense and interact with the environment.pdf

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Now I see it! Now I get it!

McCormick Place - W184d

Without out a doubt the recent pandemic has demonstrated that, the efforts in the science classroom towards scientific literacy are more relevant than ever. In this session participants will learn simple effective visual literacy tools and strategies that make learning science visible to all students, supporting diversity and reinforcing scientific literacy skills that help students make sense of the world. The strategies and tools used in this presentation will highlight the need to incorporate visual literacy as current brain research shows that around 60% of information we process every day comes in visual form. Sometimes chunking content to smaller learning bites can lower the understanding of concepts and ideas, especially if these concepts are abstract in nature; learning how to maximize the use of visuals both student and teacher made supports deeper understanding not just on a particular concept but of how they are connected making sense of the world. These strategies support cultural competency as they support learner diversity while working on scientific literacy skills such as use of evidence/data, pose questions, find answers. By having a common visual as point of reference along with strategy and tools not only closes the gap on background knowledge and makes accessible to all students but also helps student and teachers have meaningful discourse highlighting students strengths to solve real world problems.

Takeaways: In this session participants will learn simple effective visual literacy tools and strategies that make learning science visible to all students, supporting diversity and reinforcing scientific literacy skills that help students make sense of the world.

Speakers

Marjorie Miles Dozier (Polk County Public Schools: Bartow, FL)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Strategies to Elevate Students Scientific Literacy with Real-World Data

McCormick Place - W181b

Science literacy is essential to be informed and engaged citizens in the 21st century. Data are what we use to do science. Thus, reading and making sense of real-world data are fundamental skills to being scientifically literate and a fun way to engage learners with science. However, how do we incorporate data into K-8 science without feeling overburdened with yet another thing to teach? By integrating it into what we are already doing! Join us to explore the connections between data, science, and literacy. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. The goal is to increase our data toolkit of strategies and resources to increase science literacy and relevance for students. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better helps students do and communicate science. Working with and learning from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ literacy skills. Let’s set our students up for success now and in the future!

Takeaways: Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into K-8 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

Speakers

Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document of links and the slide deck from the workshop.

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Linking Literature and STEM in the PreK-8 Classroom

McCormick Place - W473

Sponsoring Company: SAE International

Attendees will explore different methods and student & teacher resources for enhancing real-world STEM skills with meaning-making literature. Using AWIM's award-winning STEM curriculum and complementary comic & children's books as examples, teachers will engage in discussions and hands-on activities they can facilitate in their classrooms. This workshop will also address how diverse representation in storytelling can foster more accessible & impactful STEM learning for all students. Participants will receive a free AWIM book.

Takeaways: Learn methods and resources for incorporating age-appropriate literature into hands-on STEM activities.

Speakers

Bonnie Thibodeau (SAE International: Warrendale, PA)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Advancing Science Instruction with Accessible Terminology

McCormick Place - W475a

Sponsoring Company: Great Minds

Interact with PhD Science® module to discover the benefits of engaging in activities that deepen conceptual understanding before introducing terminology to students.

Takeaways: PhD Science is rooted in the belief that complex scientific language and vocabulary terms are not a prerequisite for conceptual science understanding, but rather a product of it.

Speakers

Ranell Blue (Great Minds: Washington, DC), Isaac Stauffer (Great Minds: Washington, DC)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Using Online Investigations with Digitized Specimens to Enhance Data Literacy and Scientific Reasoning

McCormick Place - W181c

Online investigations with digitized specimens offer broad opportunities for teachers to engage their students in authentic scientific research. EPIC Bioscience investigations are free, online, NGSS-aligned research investigations that guide students to participate in science practices: asking a question, collecting data, analyzing and interpreting findings, and communicating to others. Investigations use specimens from natural history collections in entomology, vertebrate zoology, mycology, and botany to provide fully-supported, online investigations centered on real phenomena and aligned to NGSS MSLS2-1 through NGSS MSLS2-4. These investigations offer key opportunities to enhance scientific literacy through effective sensemaking with student-collected data on compelling specimens. This session focuses on two key goals to help teachers support sensemaking during phenomena-based student investigations: (1) Identifying and remediating common student errors and confusion during data collection and analysis. (2) Practicing effective instructional strategies focused on enhancing students’ scientific reasoning and data interpretation. This session will involve hands-on experiences with student activities, as well as interactive discussion of classroom examples and evidence.

Takeaways: Identify common student errors and sources of confusion during data collection, analysis, and interpretation and deploy strategies designed to enhance student sensemaking from data.

Speakers

Kirsten Butcher (The University of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT), Madlyn Larson (Natural History Museum of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

EPIC Bioscience - Specimen Measurement Guide
A visual guide to measuring specimens, with examples and non-examples.
EPIC Bioscience - Data Interpretation Guide
Visual student guide to interpreting data patterns, with examples and non-examples.

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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The Meaning Beyond the Words

McCormick Place - W178a

For years, research on the language of classrooms explored how the way we say things impacts students’ sense of belonging. This session uses the NSTA Teacher Tip Tuesday—The Meaning Beyond The Words: How Language, Race, and Culture Impact Science Teaching and Learning web seminar to consider how we signal to students that we value their ideas and how they communicate those ideas in the science classroom and what we can do as educators to help ensure our students know they belong in the classroom and can do science. Participants will learn about opportunities to continue the learning after the session ends through NSTA’s new Professional Learning Units.

Takeaways: 1. Become aware of how we signal (or don’t signal) to students their ideas and how they communicate their ideas are valued in the science classroom; and 2. Learn strategies to support students in building on their ideas and each other's ideas to move toward building deep conceptual understanding of big ideas in science (disciplinary core ideas).

Speakers

Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/ktURlAGyUA4_E

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Broaden Science Participation: Unpack “Analyze & Interpret” to Teach Data As an Equalizer

McCormick Place - W179b

We live in a data-driven world, and our students will be working in a data-driven workforce. Therefore, it is critical that our Pre-K-12 students learn foundational data literacy skills. However, currently these skills are too often only taught in upper-level classes. All students need these skills and all students, down to our little Pre-Kers, can work with and make sense of science data. Let’s make sure data is an equalizer, rather than another divider in our educational system and society! Join us as we explore what perception and learning science tell us about how our brains process data. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources to build science knowledge and self-efficacy through data. Finally, we will explore ways to adapt our existing curriculum activities and data visualizations to help our students more equitably access science. Through hands-on activities and group discussions, participants will leave more empowered to leverage data and data visualizations into their science content in purposeful ways for all learners. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall 21st century skills. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

Takeaways: Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century for all students and ways to adjust existing curriculum to leverage data as entry points into science inquiry, sensemaking, and knowledge for all learners to see themselves in STEM.

Speakers

Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document and a slide deck from the workshop.

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Exploring OpenSciEd from Carolina

McCormick Place - W471a

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Come experience a model lesson from OpenSciEd for Middle School and see how the new Carolina Certified Edition makes these high-quality instructional materials even better!

Takeaways: 1. Experience the pedagogy of OpenSciEd through a model lesson; 2. Learn ways to encourage equitable classroom discourse; and 3. Create a Driving Question Board to explore real-world phenomena.

Speakers

Cory Ort (Carolina Biological Supply Co.: Burlington, NC)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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We Are All Explorers

McCormick Place - W184d

How are you engaging all students in critical skills to ensure they are ready for the future of work? What does the classroom feel, sound, and look like when students are making sense of their world and solving real-world problems? Join the alumni from the 2021 Northrop Grumman Foundation Teachers Academy as they share the ways they have transformed their schools/classrooms to align with the reality of work as experienced alongside engineers, technologists, and scientists.

Takeaways: Strategies to integrate workforce skills aligned with the vision of the K–12 Framework.

Speakers

Rachel Kenning (Spring Creek Middle School: Providence, UT), Anthony Carter (Middle River Middle School: Middle River, MD), Yevgeny Pevzner (Kearns Junior High School: Salt Lake City, UT), Leilani O'Dell (Union Avenue Elementary School: Los Angeles, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NGFTA Alumni--Workplace Skills

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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"You Can't Give, What You Don't Have": Preparing future STEM Educators with Sensemaking for Equity

McCormick Place - W193a

Built on the idea that, "you can't give what you don't have" (Heibert, 2018), we have intentionally designed our STEM teacher preparation pathway using the NSTA pillar of sensemaking. The undergraduate STEM major integrates the four pillars of sensemaking across the STEM curriculum and is brought together through a seminar to support culturally sustaining STEM teaching. We will share intentionally designed curricular ideas, investigations across the various fields of study (computer science, engineering, biology, chemistry, and mathematics), field experiences, mentorship and research opportunities for our NSF Noyce Scholars and STEM majors. This will be co-presented with undergraduate students and mentor teachers so participants will get an idea of the collaboration and design across various contexts. As STEM teacher educators, we must design and model sensemaking with supports and scaffolding so that our STEM graduates are confident in designing and revising curriculum that holds sensemaking and culturally sustaining pedagogy at the core (Emdin, 2021; Emdin 2022, Paris, 2012).

Takeaways: Participants will take away specific strategies for designing STEM teacher preparation built on a foundation of sensemaking and culturally responsive pedagogy.

Speakers

Kristin Rainville (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Bonnie Maur (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Sydney Worthen-Jenkins (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Nicole Hebert (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Matter and Energy Learning Progressions in OpenSciEd High School Chemistry

McCormick Place - W196c

The forthcoming OpenSciEd High School chemistry course combines physical science and Earth and space science NGSS performance expectations as a way to engage students in developing understandings around energy and matter. Learn about the focus of the five units that make up this course and their associated performance expectation bundles to see how the three dimensions are used as a way to authentically engage students in making sense of both physical science and earth and space science related phenomena and design solutions. In the session, we will highlight how anchoring phenomena of the first unit, typically associated with earth and space science, helps students make sense of the particulate nature of matter, energy transfers in earth systems, feedback loops, and human interactions with their environment. An in-depth examination of the performance expectation bundles for the following four units will help illustrate the learning progressions students will follow to develop progressively more complex models of the particle nature of matter, its properties, and its interactions using the lenses of all crosscutting concepts, in particular, patterns, energy and matter, structure and function, and stability and change.

Takeaways: Incorporation of earth and space science NGSS performance expectations within a chemistry curriculum supports student engagement in and sensemaking of chemistry concepts around properties and interactions of matter and energy.

Speakers

Nicole Vick (Northwestern University: No City, No State), Dan Voss (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Tara McGill (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Chicago 2022 Chemistry Progressions.pdf

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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What Is Sensemaking? Exploration and Consensus-Building Tasks for Individuals and Teams

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Join us to learn what sensemaking is and how to use research-based resources to engage students in making sense of the world around them. Leave with a collection of resources to move your professional learning forward no matter where you are on the sensemaking continuum.

Takeaways: Develop an understanding of what sensemaking is and how it can help build classrooms where students are able to make sense of the world around them. Leaders walk away with a consensus-building exercise for their team.

Speakers

Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Elizabeth Allan (University of Central Oklahoma: Edmond, OK)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

McCormick Place - W185d

Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

Takeaways: Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

Speakers

Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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3D@NSTA: Strengthening Science Teaching Practice with CCCs

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

In this session, the co-editors of the recent NSTA Press book, Crosscutting Concepts: Strengthening Science and Engineering Learning, will take a deep dive into how crosscutting concepts can be more explicitly leveraged to strengthen science instruction. Presenters will illustrate how two instructional units—one elementary and one secondary—have developed CCCs as lenses on phenomena in order to better connect with students’ everyday experiences and to enhance students’ ability to meaningfully integrate SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs to make sense of authentic phenomena and problems.

Takeaways: CCCs are: 1) lenses on phenomena and problems; 2) critical to sensemaking about phenomena and problems; and 3) most useful when meaningfully integrated with SEPs and DCIs.

Speakers

Jeff Nordine (The University of Iowa: Iowa City, IA), Okhee Lee (New York University: New York, NY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA 2022 CCCs in 3D Learning PPT 7-21-22.pptx

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Maximize the Benefits and Minimize the Challenges Associated with Embedding Engineering into the Science Curriculum using Argument-Driven Engineering

McCormick Place - W178b

This session is an introduction to a new approach to STEM instruction called Argument-Driven Engineering (ADE). ADE is an instructional approach that gives students an opportunity to learn to use core concepts and processes form science, engineering, and mathematics to figure out solutions to a meaningful and authentic problem that will help make the world a better place. This instructional approach also gives students an opportunity to develop disciplinary literacy skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) because they must obtain information, share and critique potential solutions through talk, and communicate what they figured out and how they know the solution is acceptable through writing. In this session, participants will examine the potential benefits and challenges associated with embedding engineering design into science classrooms and learn how the ADE instructional model can help maximize the benefits and reduce the challenges. Participants will also have a chance to experience an example of an ADE design challenge that invites them to design a shipping and storage container for insulin and see examples of how students who completed this design challenge used science, engineering, and mathematics content and processes to figure out how to keep the insulin cold for long periods of time. Participants will also learn about how this new approach was developed through three years of classroom-based research by a team of researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and how well ADE instructional materials are aligned with the TEKS for science, mathematics, CTE, and ELA.

Takeaways: • How to give students an opportunity to learn how to use concepts and processes from science, engineering, and mathematics to design a solution to an authentic problem that will help make the world a better place.

Speakers

Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Using the NSTA Sensemaking Tool to Support Creating, Revising, and Selecting High-Quality Science Lessons

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Gain experience using the NSTA Sensmaking Tool to become critical consumers of curricular materials and support creating/revising lessons for sensemaking.

Takeaways: 1. Learn how to use the NSTA Sensemaking Tool to review science lessons for the four critical aspects of sensemaking; and 2. Understand how to use the Sensemaking Tool to support creating and revising existing science lessons for sensemaking.

Speakers

Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/x2paxwvcfUQ_E

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Crash Science: When Physics Meets Biology

McCormick Place - W185b-c

Use innovative video-assisted STEM activities, demonstrations, award-winning videos, and behind-the-crash-tests tours to teach the science of car crashes. Visit classroom.iihs.org for more information.

Takeaways: Participants learn how to incorporate culminating STEM design challenges (Project Pedestrian Sensors and Egg-Carrying Paper Car Crash) into their curriculum to promote student awareness and understanding of how engineering and technology are used to build safer vehicles.

Speakers

Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Engineer Physical Science Excitement with a Carolina STEM Challenge®

McCormick Place - W471a

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Apply creative problem-solving skills and engineering practices to chemistry and physical science challenges with race cars and rockets. Experience how Carolina makes it easy to incorporate STEM into your classroom.

Takeaways: Teachers will take away hands-on experience in designing, making, and testing balloon race cars and reaction rockets.

Speakers

Patti Kopkau (Retired Educator: National City, MI)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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When Cells Talk, Things Happen: Cell Signaling

McCormick Place - W475b

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

During this workshop, participants will work explore cell communication using hands-on models of synapses. Participants will experience how using models to explore abstract concepts deepens student understanding and inquiry for students and provides opportunities for formative assessments of student understanding. Participants will also have opportunities to deepen and challenge their own conceptual understanding of cell communication by altering the biochemical events within the synapses. These changes will reflect what happens when synapses are disturbed by drugs, including both prescription and drugs of abuse, as well as some mental health disorders. Finally, ideas for three-dimensional summative assessments will be explored.

Takeaways: Hands on models of synapses let students explore cell communication and the structure and function relationship of proteins and signaling molecules including toxins and drugs.

Speakers

Kim Parfitt (3D Molecular Designs: Milwaukee, WI)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Workshop Resources

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Teaching Grey Water Reuse and Water Recycling

McCormick Place - W181a

Water: It’s constantly in use all around us, but did you know that you can recycle water just like paper or plastic? Droughts and water scarcity are becoming an increasingly common phenomenon, and it is estimated that nearly 6 billion people will suffer from clean water scarcity by 2050. Yet, every year, Americans throw 11 trillion gallons of reusable water, also known as grey water, down the drain. In this series of lessons, students will learn about where their water comes from, the human water cycle, the three types of water and the connection between droughts and climate change. These lessons will also tie into the broader themes of sustainability and climate science and incorporate hands-on STEM activities and career connections. The lessons are primarily for elementary students but can be adapted for older audiences. They will be free for all teachers to use in their classrooms and are developed by Shreya Ramachandran, founder of The Grey Water Project in concert with educators. Join us for the presentation to learn more about grey water, why teaching about grey water and water conservation is important and how you can bring this to your classroom!

Takeaways: Session participants will learn about grey water reuse and water recycling and how they can be effective drought solutions.

Speakers

Shreya Ramachandran (Stanford University: Stanford, CA)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Science Teachers ARE Math Teachers: Integrating Mathematical Thinking into Sensemaking

McCormick Place - W185a

Using real-world phenomena asks students to puzzle out answers to problems that occur in their day-to-day lives. It encourages students to enter into sensemaking using their own prior knowledge and tools. One of the best tools to make sense of a phenomenon is math. Learn from CCSS Math and NGSS specialists about using mathematical thinking to promote scientific literacy. This session includes a focus on student agency, sensemaking, and supporting connections between the STEM classroom and real-world phenomena. The presenters will map CCSS Mathematics and NGSS connections while providing strategies for increasing agency and sensemaking in the classroom. Questions we will consider include: How do we support all students in becoming mathematical thinkers? How do we promote agency by providing students with authentic, engaging opportunities to collect, analyze, and interpret real-world data? How can phenomena and questioning techniques support mathematical thinking?  Come explore new possibilities of what high-quality sensemaking with math can look like for all learners.

Takeaways: Teachers will take away strategies to integrate mathematical thinking into student sensemaking about scientific phenomena.

Speakers

Emily Mathews (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Alanna Mertens (DePaul University STEM Center: Chicago, IL)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Including Teachers in Developing Large-Scale Assessments for Science

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Learn about the novel approach taken by Illinois to include teacher voice in developing a statewide three-dimensional science assessment.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about the process of developing a state-wide assessment written by local educators.

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Harvey Henson (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL), Angela Box (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Chickenology: Food Delivery Challenge

McCormick Place - W179b

Participants will use sensemaking and the engineering design process to solve a real world food production problem in a small scale format. This lesson introduces the Food Delivery Challenge, in which participants must design a gravity feeder to carry food (chicken feed) to twelve hungry chickens for over 24 hours. To accomplish the task students must design and build a model of an efficient gravity feeder using the materials available to them. The scenario presented to the class: One of the feeders in your uncle’s barn has broken down, and a new one will not arrive until next month. You must create a gravity feeder to satisfy 12 chickens for 24 hours consistently to ensure the health of your flock. Participants will research, design, build and test their design before presenting to the group for feedback, Participants will then use the feedback to redesign for an improved feeder.

Takeaways: 1. Use the engineering design process to collaborate, design and build a gravitational feeder system that will feed 10 pounds of feed over a 24 hour period. 2. Present your design plan, and final product to the class for feedback. 3. Provide feedback to the design team for design improvement.

Speakers

Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH), Heather Bryan (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Lesson
Chickenology Student Rubric
Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Slide Deck

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Becoming AJEDIIs: Teaching and leading STEM education during a pandemic using chemistry and other eqSTrEAM ideas

McCormick Place - W178a

Building on workshops facilitated by Gholdy Muhammad during the 2020-2021 academic year, STEM teachers will explore how historically responsive literacy can be extended to science teaching and learning. The AJEDII Model considers how accessibility, justice, equity, diversity and identity shape pedagogy. Participants will review the framework, develop units aligned to current student learning standards, and explore resources developed by facilitators for a range of instructional modes and situations. When COVID-19 hit our schools, STEM educators took on the task of processing and fighting misinformation, teaching and training students, parents, colleagues and other adults in their community about a wide range of technical terms and implementing novel pedagogical technologies and techniques like never before. The imagined worlds of science fiction were being realized but the ending still has not been determined and has certainly not been predictable. Unfortunately, the pandemic that became most clear in 2020 was exacerbated by social problems that could no longer be ignored. Participants will leave the session with materials for designing instruction for virtual (asynchronous or synchronous) and face-to-face learning based on facilitators’ experiences.

Takeaways: STEM educators will apply Muhammad's (2020) historically responsive framework to secondary STEM education in learning design

Speakers

Joy Barnes-Johnson (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Shefali Mehta (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Mridula Bajaj (Mount Laurel Schools: Mount Laurel, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Oil Spill Simulation Inquiry
This is a full description of the oil spill simulation that represents STEM as a key component of "cultivating genius". Integrating STEM meaningfully into lessons as a way to allow students to experience joy while building skills, criticality and intellect.
AJEDII Presentation
Overview of how Historically Responsive Literacy (Muhammad, 2020) is applied to chemistry.

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Instructional Materials that Support Equitable Science Instruction for All Students

McCormick Place - W185b-c

In this session, participants will be introduced to a framework for identifying the features of a classroom culture that support equitable sensemaking. There are four main features: 1. Who is engaged in (or excluded from) classroom activity? 2. Who is treated as a "knower" in the classroom? 3. What ways of knowing are privileged in the classroom? 4. What science is practiced in the classroom? This framework is based off Kerri Wingert's Classroom Culture Investigations document and utilized as a foundational pieces of the OpenSciEd materials. Participants will unpack this framework and identify in sample pieces of student work and classroom videos examples of each one of these categories in action. They will be provided with tools and resources for self-assessing their own classroom culture including an exit ticket they can give to students to help inform the instruction. Examples of student work and instructional materials will be from the OpenScIEd instructional materials for middle school science.

Takeaways: Classroom culture is critical to providing equitable sensemaking opportunities for all students.

Speakers

Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Geometric String Art: Something for Everyone!

McCormick Place - W180

During this session, I will provide participants with black card stock, needles, string, graph paper and tape. We will start by creating the artwork as this will fuel the discussion later. I will walk participants through the steps using a guided slideshow with pictures. They will be given multiple options and allowed to experiment with their selections. I will give them time to work at their tables to create their art and walk around to help. The discussion portion will happen after the art creation. I will ask the groups to share their art with their table. The valuable portion of the session is when we will brainstorm the modifications that can be done to help all students access this activity. I will ask groups to discuss and share out as I create a list. I will add any modifications not already mentioned. Next, I would like the groups to discuss how this can be used in their classes, including the modifications they would need to suit their students. As a take away, participants will have a note taking sheet, access to the slideshow (includes examples and instructions), list of supplies needed and where to purchase, their beautiful artwork, and valuable discussions.

Takeaways: In addition to the art work, participants will leave with ideas, templates and modifications for a variety of students.

Speakers

Terri Serey (Orange Grove Middle School: Hacienda Heights, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Geometric String Art.pdf

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Effective Discourse Strategies for Creating Inclusive STEM Classrooms

McCormick Place - W181a

This session by members of NSTA’s Professional Learning Committee is designed to help teachers deepen their understanding of the effective and practical strategies to facilitate academic discourse that promotes inclusive science and STEM classrooms. Participants will engage in a variety of instructional strategies to ensure that all students have access to scientific discourse, and opportunities to collaborate with peers, through intentional planning. Participants will engage in a variety of formative assessment classroom techniques (FACTS) from Page Keeley’s Uncovering Student Ideas texts, including commit and toss, pro/con pairs, structured think-pair-share, and more. In addition, we will be discussing the shift away from traditional talk patterns- like I-R-E (Initiate, Response, Evaluation) and towards Productive Talk to promote an inclusive science and STEM classroom where discourse supports student sensemaking. Finally, we will provide resources and discussion around the “lead4ward Instructional Strategies Playlist”, which provides teachers with detailed descriptions of specific, instructional strategies. Links to additional discourse resources will also be provided. The instructional strategies used in this presentation will promote student engagement, differentiation, and scientific understanding to help form a more inclusive learning environment where all students can participate in scientific discourse.

Takeaways: Participants will experience a variety of impactful instructional strategies that promote scientific discourse to help create an inclusive STEM learning environment.

Speakers

Kimberley Astle (Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction: Olympia, WA), Rebecca Garelli (Arizona Dept. of Education: Phoenix, AZ), Angela McMurry (The Ohio Academy of Science: Dublin, OH)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Evaluating STEM Curricula with Equity and Inclusivity in Mind

McCormick Place - W178b

Explore EiE’s curriculum design principles for inclusivity and NSTA’s sensemaking pillars as tools to evaluate curricula for inclusivity and equity.

Takeaways: Participants will leave this session with a framework for evaluating curricula with equity and inclusivity in mind.

Speakers

Diana Christopherson (Museum of Science, Boston: Boston, MA)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Using scientific data and data collection to make sense of real world phenomena!

McCormick Place - W176a

Using data collection , participants will learn how to actively engage students in a conversation about data and the phenomena that it explains. Participants will learn how to create and/or modify old lessons, labs, and activities into opportunities for discussion , inquiry, and discovery using calculators, Nspire, and labquests.

Takeaways: Create a dynamic lesson for use in the science classroom using data collection.

Speakers

Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Chicago Packet.pdf
Copy of Opening (1).pptx

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Data, Tables, Graphs, Oh My! Strategies to Get All Students Doing & Speaking Science

McCormick Place - W176c

We are naturally curious, prone to ask why? How? What? Unfortunately, somewhere along the way students lose the trust in their voices to ask questions of and from data. But data are what we use to do science and it permeates all aspects of society today. What should we do? Stop teaching the vocabulary of science and data first, and instead leverage classroom-ready strategies to empower students to lead with their innate curiosity to practice critical 21st century data literacy skills and master the science content. Join us to explore connections between our science content, inquiry-based activities, and data skills. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy and student empowerment. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better help students do and communicate science. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall self-identity as a scientist. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

Takeaways: Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century, how students can do a lot more with data than we often think or presume from their science vocabulary alone, and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into 6-12 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

Speakers

Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Access to Resource Document
Complete the Google Form to gain access to the Resource Document and slide deck from the workshop.

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Advancing Science Instruction with Hands-On Investigations

McCormick Place - W475a

Sponsoring Company: Great Minds

Explore a PhD Science® module to uncover how hands-on investigations allow students to develop an understanding of science concepts that apply far beyond the classroom.

Takeaways: PhD Science introduces students to new concepts through engaging activities that allow them to first observe and wonder and then to investigate and deeply understand phenomena.

Speakers

Ranell Blue (Great Minds: Washington, DC), Isaac Stauffer (Great Minds: Washington, DC)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Crosscutting Concepts: Using a Familiar Perspective to Understand Your World

McCormick Place - W471a

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

How do crosscutting concepts link the ideas and practices of science across different domains and over time? We’ll show you practical examples to see how crosscutting concepts provide a foundation for student sensemaking of phenomena and problems.

Takeaways: 1. Define the seven crosscutting concepts; 2. Learn strategies to incorporate crosscutting concepts into science lessons; and 3. Understand how crosscutting concepts support student sensemaking.

Speakers

Bridget Hughes-Binstock (Carolina Biological Supply Co.: Burlington, NC)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Using the Scientific Process to Conquer Smallpox

McCormick Place - W196a

We can examine natural phenomena and address wicked problems using the scientific process. The smallpox virus emerged approximately 10,000 years ago, and the virus's global spread devastated civilizations. Thanks to the scientific thinking of a Buddhist nun, a milkmaid, and Edward Jenner, smallpox was declared eradicated in 1979 by the World Health Organization. To support the understanding of the nature of science in the NGSS (Appendix H), session participants will engage in activities that demonstrate how science is used to answer questions about the natural world through a process that is consistent, observational, natural, predictable, tentative, and testable. Additionally, participants will examine various media sources to learn how to identify scientific misinformation and the tactics used to make misinformation appear credible. The National Center for Science Education supports science teachers through free professional development and curriculum to recognize and address science misconceptions using the three dimensions of the NGSS. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

Takeaways: This session introduces participants to a basic understanding of the scientific process, how our knowledge of the natural world evolves with new evidence, and that science cannot answer questions that do not pertain to natural processes. Attendees will take a deep dive into an NGSS storyline sequence developed to help students understand that science is an ongoing process that must be supported by multiple lines of evidence to be accepted by the scientific community.

Speakers

Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), DeeDee Wright (Colorado State University: Fort Collins, CO), Cari Herndon (District of Columbia Public Schools: Washington, DC), Ayesha Alirahi (Science Teacher: , 0), Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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A Rubric Design for Making Sense of Elementary Students’ 3D Knowledge and Understanding.

McCormick Place - W186c

This session explores two key challenges faced by elementary school teachers for promoting 3D learning as outlined by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). These are: (1) how to make sense of 3D proficiency based on student responses to assessment tasks, and (2) how to use student responses to inform next steps in instruction. We will address these challenges by guiding participants as they explore a set of 3D assessment tasks that are freely available online. These tasks have been developed in collaboration with teachers for performance expectations in physical science, life science, and earth and space science. During the session, we will highlight how the tasks help elicit what students know and can do. Participants will then learn about the features of the associated rubrics and practice applying rubrics to make sense of student responses. We will also share how information from rubric use can inform next steps in instruction and engage participants in a discussion about instructional decision making. Through this process, participants will learn about rubric features that will inform their own creations and adaptations of rubrics. Furthermore, participants will learn about various resources that are freely available.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn about the features of a new rubric that has been designed based on feedback from elementary school teachers. Through examples and discussions, attendees will learn how the rubric can help them evaluate student responses in a timely manner and provide detailed information about what students know and can do. This information can be valuable in linking student responses to 3D proficiencies and in determining instructional next-steps for teachers.

Speakers

Sania Zaidi (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Samuel Arnold (Research Assistant: Chicago, IL)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Instructional Coaching in Elementary Science

McCormick Place - W187b

In this session we will explore the experience of an instructional coach working with a fifth-grade teacher to engage students in three-dimensional learning using an NGSS curriculum at an urban school.

Takeaways: This session will explore how instructional coaches can be leveraged in elementary schools to support teachers and students in implementing the NGSS.

Speakers

Alayla Ende (University at Buffalo, SUNY: Buffalo, NY)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Inclusive Grading of 3-D Science

McCormick Place - W178b

How can grading better represent students’ 3-D learning? This workshop will take a specific focus on grading phenomenon-driven curricula that do not have typical worksheets.

Takeaways: Standards-based grading and careful selection of student work aligned to lesson-level PEs for feedback can help make 3-D learning more meaningful for students.

Speakers

Kerri Wingert (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Dude Perfect Physics…or Using Student Interests as a Conduit to Learning

McCormick Place - W185b-c

It’s important to keep your finger on the pulse of what students are interested in beyond the walls of the classroom. By keeping up with pop culture and current events you gain a window to the world that a child sees. The trick is to capture that interest and use it to communicate academic content through a lens that stays with them. In this session we’ll see some effective tools that keep the message fresh and effective.

Takeaways: Using pop culture interests can be more fun and engaging than putting a character on a worksheet.

Speakers

John Hawkins (Oak Hill School: Nashville, TN)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Using Studies Weekly Science to Combine Hands-on Learning and Literacy

McCormick Place - W473

Sponsoring Company: Studies Weekly

Get an overview of how Studies Weekly Science integrates content and disciplinary science literacy. See how the print and digital components work together to support every learner. Receive free copies of the student and teacher materials and participate in a hands-on activity that demonstrates the ease of the curriculum.

Takeaways: Learn how Studies Weekly Science supports content and disciplinary science literacy.

Speakers

Clayton Chamberlain (Studies Weekly: Orem, UT)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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What Is a Phenomenon Anyway?

McCormick Place - W194b

Sponsoring Company: Phenomenon Science Education

In this session, we will explore what phenomena are by looking at examples and non-examples and using criteria to figure out the differences.

Takeaways: Participants will be given criteria and guidelines that they will use to evaluate science phenomena.

Speakers

Shanon Cates (Idaho State Department of Education: No City, No State), Joshua Smith (Phenomenon Science Education: Novato, CA)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Expanding Participation and Success in STEM Teaching Through Partnerships

McCormick Place - W181a

Ideas and concrete strategies for building collaborative, generative partnerships with community groups, nonprofits, preK–12 schools, museums, and community colleges in order to transform the STEM ecosystem and preservice teachers' futures will be shared.

Takeaways: Participants will: 1. hear from different partners about the generative ways we have collaborated to increase diversity in our STEM teacher preparation program; 2. engage in discussion and planning next steps for reaching out to a potential collaborative partner; and 3. learn about the ways in which preservice STEM Noyce Scholars have strengthened their STEM Identity and have been prepared to design culturally sustaining curricula and classrooms that integrate sensemaking.

Speakers

Sydney Worthen-Jenkins (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Nicole Hebert (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Bonnie Maur (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Kristin Rainville (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 5:40 PM
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Join Us for the Elementary STEM Showcase!

McCormick Place - W183a

Wander your way through 30 different STEM stations to learn about resources, lessons, and teaching strategies to incorporate more STEM into your school and classroom. This farmer's market–type event brings together educators, authors, researchers, and leaders in early childhood through fifth-grade STEM education. Leave with a mindful of great ideas and be inspired!

Takeaways: Pick up great ideas and be inspired during this farmer's market–type event.

Speakers

Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Heather Pacheco-Guffrey (Bridgewater State University: Bridgewater, MA), Lauren Burrow (Stephen F. Austin State University: Nacogdoches, TX), Susan Erickson (Country School: Weston, MA), Sara Nelson (Iowa State University: Ames, IA), Constance Beecher (Iowa State University: Ames, IA), Elizabeth Dethloff (Robert R. Shaw Center for STEAM: Katy, TX), Christine Preston (The University of Sydney: Sydney, Australia), Catherine Scott (Coastal Carolina University: Conway, SC), Kristin Cook (Bellarmine University: Louisville, KY), Richard Cox, Jr. (Winthrop University: Rock Hill, SC), Annette Venegas (Kent School District: Kent, WA), Juliette Guarino Berg (The Town School: New York, NY), Katie Morrison (University Child Development School: Seattle, WA), Wendi Laurence (Create-osity: Park City, UT), Katrina Kmak (Park City Library: Park City, UT), Brittnie Hecht (Park City Library: Park City, UT), Diana Lockwood (Consultant, Researcher & Author: , 0), Godwyn Morris (Dazzling Discoveries / Skill Mill NYC: New York, NY), Bridget Miller (University of South Carolina: Columbia, SC), Christie Martin (University of South Carolina: Columbia, SC), Rebecca Kurson (Collegiate School: New York, NY), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Shelly Counsell (The University of Memphis: Memphis, TN), Belle Akers (Convent & Stuart Hall's Schools of the Sacred Heart: San Francisco, CA), Kathleen Tate (American Public University System: Charles Town, WV), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS), Bill Burton (The Lamplighter School: Dallas, TX), Barbara Bromley (Hazelwood Elementary School: Lynnwood, WA), Kim Stilwell (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Nancy McIntyre (Robotics Education & Competition Foundation: Greenville, TX), Shari Haug (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL), Jane Savatski (Janet Berry Elementary School: Appleton, WI), Katrina Pavlik (Deputy Executive Director: Oakbrook Terrace, IL), Mitchell Rosenberg (Kinderlab Robotics, Inc.: Waltham, MA), Tiffany Leones (Digital Promise: Washington, DC), Beth Dykstra VanMeeteren (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA), Danielle Scharen (North Carolina State University: Raleigh, NC), Frances Hamilton (The University of Alabama in Huntsville: Huntsville, AL), Jennifer Williams (Isidore Newman School: New Orleans, LA), Anne Lowry (Aleph Academy: Reno, NV)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Exploring Energy Transfer in Ecosystems with SageModeler
Mindfulness Jar recipe
Mars Mission Specialist.pdf
Touch-Talk-Text Practices that support reading and science instruction

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Scaffolding Students’ Progression Through CCCs and SEPs Using Resources from the OpenSciEd Toolkit

McCormick Place - W186c

See how tools developed within OpenSciEd units can support students’ progression of and engagement in SEPs and CCCs across a variety of unit contexts.

Takeaways: Participants will leave with practical tools such as graphic organizers, general rubrics, and self- and peer-assessments that can be used to support students in incrementally building SEPs and CCCs in a variety of units.

Speakers

Dawn Novak (Science Educator: Grayslake, IL), Gail Housman (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Jamie Deutch Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA 2022 Chicago - SEP and CCC Toolkit Slides.pdf
https://www.openscied.org/teacher-resources/

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse: A 5E Instructional Unit on the Human Body

McCormick Place - W185d

The provided instructional unit will elicit students’ prior knowledge, as well as foster their individual and collective understandings of the human body.

Takeaways: Attendees will be encouraged to utilize facet-based assessments and classroom argumentation throughout lessons framed with the 5E instructional model.

Speakers

Alicia Herrera (John C. Fremont Middle School: Las Vegas, NV)