OpenSciEd - Carolina (P-U from March)
 

2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Wednesday, July 20
8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
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SC-1: Developing and Using Three-Dimensional Assessment Tasks to Support NGSS Instruction

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Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Hyde Park A/B

Ticket Price:

  • $75 earlybird
  • $100 advance

If you have not yet registered for the conference, you may purchase tickets when you register online.

Please note that if you are already registered for the conference and wish to purchase this ticket, click the "add to cart" button above.

Assessment tasks for NGSS classrooms are different from the typical tasks that require students to recall what they know. A Framework for K–12 Science Education and the NGSS call for assessment tasks that ask students to use and apply the three dimensions of science proficiency: disciplinary core ideas, scientific and engineering practices, and crosscutting concepts. With three-dimensional tasks, the expectation is that students will use and apply the three dimensions of science proficiency together to make sense of phenomena or solve problems.

In this session, we focus on designing three-dimensional assessment tasks for classroom use with an emphasis on assessment for teaching and learning. A good assessment task should provide actionable information of value to teachers and their students. Importantly, it should provide insight into how students are building toward an NGSS performance expectation.

How can we use performance expectations to construct assessment tasks that can be used during instruction? Participants will learn an approach for designing three-dimensional assessment tasks and explore how to use them formatively in classrooms to help students build toward the performance expectations.

Participants will also be able to preorder our assessment book Creating and Using Instructionally Supportive Assessments in NGSS Classrooms.

Takeaways: Participants will learn: 1. what is meant by three-dimensional assessment; 2. how to design classroom-based assessment tasks aligned with the NGSS; and 3. how to make use of formative assessment tasks to support instruction.

Speakers

Joseph Krajcik (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI), Christopher Harris (K-12 Alliance/WestEd: Redwood City, CA)

Wednesday, July 20
11:45 AM - 12:45 PM
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Lunch: Elements of Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Regency Ballroom

By Invitation Only

Shifting from traditional professional development to curriculum-based professional learning is a simple concept but complex to design and execute well. At its core, it means teachers experience the same kind of inquiry-based learning we expect them to provide their students. Learn more about a Carnegie Corporation of New York report, The Elements, which identifies a core set of research-based actions, approaches, and enabling conditions that effective schools and systems have put in place to reinforce and amplify the power of high-quality curriculum and skillful teaching.

Takeaways: 1. Examine beliefs and assumptions regarding the relationship between high-quality instructional materials, curriculum-based professional learning and student success 2. Gain understanding of the foundation for The Elements, a challenge paper from Carnegie Corporation of New York 3. Learn from science practitioners whose successful curriculum implementation efforts are grounded in the elements and essentials.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Wednesday, July 20
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
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SC-2: Supporting Teachers and Students in the Science Classroom Using NSTA’s Instructional Coaching Tools and Protocols

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Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Hyde Park A/B

Ticket Price:

  • $75 earlybird
  • $100 advance

If you have not yet registered for the conference, you may purchase tickets when you register online.

Please note that if you are already registered for the conference and wish to purchase this ticket, click the "add to cart" button above.

This workshop is designed for instructional coaches and leaders who want to support their teachers in making the instructional shifts required by three-dimensional science standards. Participants will receive NSTA’s suite of instructional coaching tools and gain experience using the protocols and providing feedback.

Takeaways: 1. Become familiar with a suite of instructional coaching tools and protocols; 2. Gain experience using the instructional coaching tools and protocols; and 3. Identify ways to use the tools to provide feedback to teachers and document growth over time.

Speakers

Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/M85g4eNS_sCs_E

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a Brand New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

Since its release, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the NGSS has become an essential tool for many educators across the country. A new version titled the Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimension has been developed to not only support teachers in all states that have standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education. This new version of the Quick-Reference Guide still contains the most useful features of the original, including descriptions of the practices and the crosscutting concepts from the Framework of K-12 Science Education and K-12 progressions of the elements of all three dimensions. In addition, the new Quick-Reference Guide contains several new features that should make it even more helpful. For example, every element now has a unique code (based on the codes in the NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions) that makes it much easier to reference a particular element. In addition, there is an entire chapter devoted to the Performance Expectations. Finally, the guide also contains a number of tools for working with standards. This session will outline all of the features of the guide through the process of unpacking the crosscutting concepts to better understand how to make curriculum, instruction, and assessment more three-dimensional.

Takeaways: A deeper understanding of the Crosscutting Concepts and how a well-designed reference guide can make it easier to unpack the three dimensions for work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

Speakers

Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Universal Design for Learning (UDL) - An Effective Approach to Ensuring an Inclusive Science Classroom

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines are a tool that can be used to design learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners (CAST, 2018). Instructional designers and teachers can use these principles to create learning environments that reduce barriers to access for all students, while keeping in mind the learning goals of the lesson. The three guiding principles of UDL are engagement, representation, and action and expression. In this session educators will be provided with examples of these principles in action in sample materials from OpenSciEd and classroom videos. In these examples, participating will identify how the materials have been purposefully designed with multiple avenues for engagement, representation, and action and expression. Additionally, they will identify the built-in supports for teachers to highlight student assets and to address potential barriers to learning for their local student population. Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

Takeaways: Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

Speakers

Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Strategies to Elevate Students Scientific Literacy with Real-World Data

McCormick Place - W181b

Science literacy is essential to be informed and engaged citizens in the 21st century. Data are what we use to do science. Thus, reading and making sense of real-world data are fundamental skills to being scientifically literate and a fun way to engage learners with science. However, how do we incorporate data into K-8 science without feeling overburdened with yet another thing to teach? By integrating it into what we are already doing! Join us to explore the connections between data, science, and literacy. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. The goal is to increase our data toolkit of strategies and resources to increase science literacy and relevance for students. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better helps students do and communicate science. Working with and learning from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ literacy skills. Let’s set our students up for success now and in the future!

Takeaways: Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into K-8 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

Speakers

Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document of links and the slide deck from the workshop.

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Linking Literature and STEM in the PreK-8 Classroom

McCormick Place - W473

Sponsoring Company: SAE International

Attendees will explore different methods and student & teacher resources for enhancing real-world STEM skills with meaning-making literature. Using AWIM's award-winning STEM curriculum and complementary comic & children's books as examples, teachers will engage in discussions and hands-on activities they can facilitate in their classrooms. This workshop will also address how diverse representation in storytelling can foster more accessible & impactful STEM learning for all students. Participants will receive a free AWIM book.

Takeaways: Learn methods and resources for incorporating age-appropriate literature into hands-on STEM activities.

Speakers

Bonnie Thibodeau (SAE International: Warrendale, PA)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Advancing Science Instruction with Accessible Terminology

McCormick Place - W475a

Sponsoring Company: Great Minds

Interact with PhD Science® module to discover the benefits of engaging in activities that deepen conceptual understanding before introducing terminology to students.

Takeaways: PhD Science is rooted in the belief that complex scientific language and vocabulary terms are not a prerequisite for conceptual science understanding, but rather a product of it.

Speakers

Ranell Blue (Great Minds: Washington, DC), Isaac Stauffer (Great Minds: Washington, DC)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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What Is Sensemaking? Exploration and Consensus-Building Tasks for Individuals and Teams

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Join us to learn what sensemaking is and how to use research-based resources to engage students in making sense of the world around them. Leave with a collection of resources to move your professional learning forward no matter where you are on the sensemaking continuum.

Takeaways: Develop an understanding of what sensemaking is and how it can help build classrooms where students are able to make sense of the world around them. Leaders walk away with a consensus-building exercise for their team.

Speakers

Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Elizabeth Allan (University of Central Oklahoma: Edmond, OK)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

McCormick Place - W185d

Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

Takeaways: Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

Speakers

Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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3D@NSTA: Strengthening Science Teaching Practice with CCCs

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

In this session, the co-editors of the recent NSTA Press book, Crosscutting Concepts: Strengthening Science and Engineering Learning, will take a deep dive into how crosscutting concepts can be more explicitly leveraged to strengthen science instruction. Presenters will illustrate how two instructional units—one elementary and one secondary—have developed CCCs as lenses on phenomena in order to better connect with students’ everyday experiences and to enhance students’ ability to meaningfully integrate SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs to make sense of authentic phenomena and problems.

Takeaways: CCCs are: 1) lenses on phenomena and problems; 2) critical to sensemaking about phenomena and problems; and 3) most useful when meaningfully integrated with SEPs and DCIs.

Speakers

Jeff Nordine (The University of Iowa: Iowa City, IA), Okhee Lee (New York University: New York, NY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA 2022 CCCs in 3D Learning PPT 7-21-22.pptx

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Using the NSTA Sensemaking Tool to Support Creating, Revising, and Selecting High-Quality Science Lessons

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Gain experience using the NSTA Sensmaking Tool to become critical consumers of curricular materials and support creating/revising lessons for sensemaking.

Takeaways: 1. Learn how to use the NSTA Sensemaking Tool to review science lessons for the four critical aspects of sensemaking; and 2. Understand how to use the Sensemaking Tool to support creating and revising existing science lessons for sensemaking.

Speakers

Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/x2paxwvcfUQ_E

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Teaching Grey Water Reuse and Water Recycling

McCormick Place - W181a

Water: It’s constantly in use all around us, but did you know that you can recycle water just like paper or plastic? Droughts and water scarcity are becoming an increasingly common phenomenon, and it is estimated that nearly 6 billion people will suffer from clean water scarcity by 2050. Yet, every year, Americans throw 11 trillion gallons of reusable water, also known as grey water, down the drain. In this series of lessons, students will learn about where their water comes from, the human water cycle, the three types of water and the connection between droughts and climate change. These lessons will also tie into the broader themes of sustainability and climate science and incorporate hands-on STEM activities and career connections. The lessons are primarily for elementary students but can be adapted for older audiences. They will be free for all teachers to use in their classrooms and are developed by Shreya Ramachandran, founder of The Grey Water Project in concert with educators. Join us for the presentation to learn more about grey water, why teaching about grey water and water conservation is important and how you can bring this to your classroom!

Takeaways: Session participants will learn about grey water reuse and water recycling and how they can be effective drought solutions.

Speakers

Shreya Ramachandran (Stanford University: Stanford, CA)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Evaluating STEM Curricula with Equity and Inclusivity in Mind

McCormick Place - W178b

Explore EiE’s curriculum design principles for inclusivity and NSTA’s sensemaking pillars as tools to evaluate curricula for inclusivity and equity.

Takeaways: Participants will leave this session with a framework for evaluating curricula with equity and inclusivity in mind.

Speakers

Diana Christopherson (Museum of Science, Boston: Boston, MA)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Advancing Science Instruction with Hands-On Investigations

McCormick Place - W475a

Sponsoring Company: Great Minds

Explore a PhD Science® module to uncover how hands-on investigations allow students to develop an understanding of science concepts that apply far beyond the classroom.

Takeaways: PhD Science introduces students to new concepts through engaging activities that allow them to first observe and wonder and then to investigate and deeply understand phenomena.

Speakers

Ranell Blue (Great Minds: Washington, DC), Isaac Stauffer (Great Minds: Washington, DC)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Crosscutting Concepts: Using a Familiar Perspective to Understand Your World

McCormick Place - W471a

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

How do crosscutting concepts link the ideas and practices of science across different domains and over time? We’ll show you practical examples to see how crosscutting concepts provide a foundation for student sensemaking of phenomena and problems.

Takeaways: 1. Define the seven crosscutting concepts; 2. Learn strategies to incorporate crosscutting concepts into science lessons; and 3. Understand how crosscutting concepts support student sensemaking.

Speakers

Bridget Hughes-Binstock (Carolina Biological Supply Co.: Burlington, NC)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Instructional Coaching in Elementary Science

McCormick Place - W187b

In this session we will explore the experience of an instructional coach working with a fifth-grade teacher to engage students in three-dimensional learning using an NGSS curriculum at an urban school.

Takeaways: This session will explore how instructional coaches can be leveraged in elementary schools to support teachers and students in implementing the NGSS.

Speakers

Alayla Ende (University at Buffalo, SUNY: Buffalo, NY)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Dude Perfect Physics…or Using Student Interests as a Conduit to Learning

McCormick Place - W185b-c

It’s important to keep your finger on the pulse of what students are interested in beyond the walls of the classroom. By keeping up with pop culture and current events you gain a window to the world that a child sees. The trick is to capture that interest and use it to communicate academic content through a lens that stays with them. In this session we’ll see some effective tools that keep the message fresh and effective.

Takeaways: Using pop culture interests can be more fun and engaging than putting a character on a worksheet.

Speakers

John Hawkins (Oak Hill School: Nashville, TN)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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What Is a Phenomenon Anyway?

McCormick Place - W194b

Sponsoring Company: Phenomenon Science Education

In this session, we will explore what phenomena are by looking at examples and non-examples and using criteria to figure out the differences.

Takeaways: Participants will be given criteria and guidelines that they will use to evaluate science phenomena.

Speakers

Shanon Cates (Idaho State Department of Education: No City, No State), Joshua Smith (Phenomenon Science Education: Novato, CA)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 5:40 PM
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Join Us for the Elementary STEM Showcase!

McCormick Place - W183a

Wander your way through 30 different STEM stations to learn about resources, lessons, and teaching strategies to incorporate more STEM into your school and classroom. This farmer's market–type event brings together educators, authors, researchers, and leaders in early childhood through fifth-grade STEM education. Leave with a mindful of great ideas and be inspired!

Takeaways: Pick up great ideas and be inspired during this farmer's market–type event.

Speakers

Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Heather Pacheco-Guffrey (Bridgewater State University: Bridgewater, MA), Lauren Burrow (Stephen F. Austin State University: Nacogdoches, TX), Susan Erickson (Country School: Weston, MA), Sara Nelson (Iowa State University: Ames, IA), Constance Beecher (Iowa State University: Ames, IA), Elizabeth Dethloff (Robert R. Shaw Center for STEAM: Katy, TX), Christine Preston (The University of Sydney: Sydney, Australia), Catherine Scott (Coastal Carolina University: Conway, SC), Kristin Cook (Bellarmine University: Louisville, KY), Richard Cox, Jr. (Winthrop University: Rock Hill, SC), Annette Venegas (Kent School District: Kent, WA), Juliette Guarino Berg (The Town School: New York, NY), Katie Morrison (University Child Development School: Seattle, WA), Wendi Laurence (Create-osity: Park City, UT), Katrina Kmak (Park City Library: Park City, UT), Brittnie Hecht (Park City Library: Park City, UT), Diana Lockwood (Consultant, Researcher & Author: , 0), Godwyn Morris (Dazzling Discoveries / Skill Mill NYC: New York, NY), Bridget Miller (University of South Carolina: Columbia, SC), Christie Martin (University of South Carolina: Columbia, SC), Rebecca Kurson (Collegiate School: New York, NY), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Shelly Counsell (The University of Memphis: Memphis, TN), Belle Akers (Convent & Stuart Hall's Schools of the Sacred Heart: San Francisco, CA), Kathleen Tate (American Public University System: Charles Town, WV), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS), Bill Burton (The Lamplighter School: Dallas, TX), Barbara Bromley (Hazelwood Elementary School: Lynnwood, WA), Kim Stilwell (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Nancy McIntyre (Robotics Education & Competition Foundation: Greenville, TX), Shari Haug (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL), Jane Savatski (Janet Berry Elementary School: Appleton, WI), Katrina Pavlik (Deputy Executive Director: Oakbrook Terrace, IL), Mitchell Rosenberg (Kinderlab Robotics, Inc.: Waltham, MA), Tiffany Leones (Digital Promise: Washington, DC), Beth Dykstra VanMeeteren (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA), Danielle Scharen (North Carolina State University: Raleigh, NC), Frances Hamilton (The University of Alabama in Huntsville: Huntsville, AL), Jennifer Williams (Isidore Newman School: New Orleans, LA), Anne Lowry (Aleph Academy: Reno, NV)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Exploring Energy Transfer in Ecosystems with SageModeler
Mindfulness Jar recipe
Mars Mission Specialist.pdf
Touch-Talk-Text Practices that support reading and science instruction

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Formative Assessment and Developing Critical Thinking Skills

McCormick Place - W187c

This session is intended to discuss the importance of formative assessment as a tool for guiding students and helping all students to make progress. A variety of formative assessment tools will be explored. Most importantly, the use of individual feedback on formative assessments will be demonstrated and we will discuss how this leads to improved metacognition and critical thinking skills for students. Attendees will see sample student work on formative assessments and accompanying sample teacher feedback. They will practice making comments of there own, in addition to discussing logistical concerns with the practice of individualized feedback.

Takeaways: This session is intended to discuss the importance of formative assessment as a tool for guiding students and helping all students to make progress.

Speakers

Jennifer Maguire (Virginia Tech: Blacksburg, VA)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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The Student Design Guild

McCormick Place - W187a

During the pandemic, STEM leaders took on the challenge of connecting PK-5 students with each other in inclusive community events that focused on expanding access to STEM learning. The Student Design Guild (SDG) is a program bringing students and families together in a Covid-safe environment. SDG had three goals in mind: continue to provide STEM outreach for elementary students, provide a sense of community at a time when schools looked different and new, and provide ways for students to make sense of the pandemic. The SDG united students through a common need and engaged them in STEM learning. Through the design thinking process (a human-centered problem-solving process) and STEM stations, the guild developed opportunities for students that included designing, creating, building, iterating and sharing, all to lay a foundation for developing essential skills necessary for secondary education / work-force readiness. Participants will -learn how to design their own district/school-based Student Design Guild -have access to a model for creating a streamlined district-wide program that expands access and participation in STEM learning view design thinking as a STEM practice -view design thinking as a STEM practice -receive a district-wide student design challenge and a variety of turn-key STEM Stations

Takeaways: Learn about one district's model for creating district-wide programming that expands access and participation in STEM learning and understand how that model can be adapted to fit the needs of the user. Understand how to use the design thinking process as a STEM practice and receive a rubric for using design thinking. Have access to a district-wide design challenge and a variety of turn-key STEM Stations for students.

Speakers

Kristen Brohm (Innovation Center of St. Vrain Valley Schools: Longmont, CO), Colin Rickman (Innovation Lab Coordinator: Longmont, CO)

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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STEM Engagement and Collaboration in Jurassic Proportions

McCormick Place - W187a

Explore the many ways dinosaurs and paleontology can be integrated into STEM curricula to attract all learners. Resources and collaboration ideas will be shared.

Takeaways: Participants will walk away with a plethora of hands-on ideas and resources (including children's literature) relating to dinosaurs, paleontology, and community resources to help inspire all learners in their contexts.

Speakers

Catherine Pangan (Butler University: Indianapolis, IN), Becky Wolfe (The Children's Museum of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Integrating Makerspace for an Inclusive Classroom

McCormick Place - W179b

It is often thought that a makerspace activity is something that is nice to do with students but not a necessity. Yet when makerspace activities are integrated into daily instruction, it can open many avenues that promote an inclusive classroom. This workshop will focus on strategies and ways to use makerspace to promote student voice and choice for areas of concept development, empathy-driven problem solving, and assessment. Participants will explore the key elements of makerspace and examine ways to use makerspace challenges to support sense-making. The discussion will also focus on the idea that makerspace activities can nudge all students to consider multiple ways of solving problems, thus enhancing their “out of the box” thinking. As part of this session, participants will explore different strategies in using makerspace to introduce a phenomenon, model a phenomenon, and assess students understanding on different dimensions of learning: Crosscutting Concepts, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Science and Engineering Practices.

Takeaways: Makerspace challenges provide student choice and voice in how they make sense of a phenomenon, a solution to a problems, and core ideas.

Speakers

Michele Detwiler (Gary Adult High School: Tampa, FL)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Phenomena to Questions: Practical Engagement Strategies for Student Sensemaking

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Explore how to use phenomena to generate student questions that allow for further investigation to support student sensemaking.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to effectively use phenomena to allow for authentic student questioning and how to use those questions to increase student engagement and sensemaking.

Speakers

Nicole Vick (Northwestern University: No City, No State)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Phenomena to Questions .pdf

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Unraveling the Mysteries of Color: Adding (and Subtracting) It All Up!

McCormick Place - W193b

Investigate how colors mix, by adding light sources or by removing colors from white light, and discover how cell phones and newspapers use these methods.

Takeaways: Color mixing has different outcomes when light sources are added than when dyes or inks subtract colors from a white background. Additive color systems are used in TVs and computer screens, while subtractive colors are found in photos and paintings.

Speakers

Gary Benenson (The City College of New York: New York, NY), Stephanie Codrington (Benjamin Banneker Magnet School of Architecture and Engineering: Brooklyn, NY), Kathy Gutierrez (P.S. 536: Bronx, NY), Gary Benenson (The City College of New York: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Battling Ignorance: 4 Words That Can Change The World

McCormick Place - Skyline W375e

Changing the world sounds like a tall order. But in reality, educators play their role to help change the world every day. Join Stephen Pruitt, former science teacher and science/policy leader, for a humorous, yet important discussion about the critical role of teachers in changing the world. Dr. Pruitt will share his experiences, both personal and professional, to remind us of the power of teachers in his life and as we recover from COVID. Dr. Pruitt has long been a member of NSTA and has worked for the national importance of science education and the support of teachers. His comical storytelling and somewhat unique look at the world will engage and inspire you as we all continue the fight against ignorance.

About the Speaker
Stephen PruittStephen Pruitt is the sixth president of the Southern Regional Education Board in July 2018. Under his leadership, SREB has continued its work on college and career readiness, postsecondary attainment, workforce preparation, learning environment, and support of the SREB states’ policy and education leaders to improve the education systems for each student.

During his career, Dr. Pruitt has amassed education policy, assessment, and instructional background at the local, state, and national levels.

Before coming to SREB, Dr. Pruitt was Kentucky’s state commissioner of education. At the national level, he had worked closely with state agencies and educators around the country to improve policy and practice in science education. In Georgia, Dr. Pruitt began his career as a high school science teacher and subsequently served in several roles for the Georgia Department of Education. Dr. Pruitt can be reached via email, Stephen.Pruitt@sreb.org, or followed on Twitter, @DrSPruitt.

Speakers

Stephen Pruitt (Southern Regional Education Board: Atlanta, GA)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Speed Sharing: STEM and STEAM

McCormick Place - W184b-c

1) Don't Reinvent the "STEM Lesson" Wheel
Creating meaningful lessons takes time. Finding helpful resources shouldn't.

2) Filling the STEAM Pipeline through Scholarships / Internships
This session will provide participants with information that teachers can share with their students relating to scholarship and internship opportunities that are offered to them for pursing studies and STEAM careers.

3) STEAM Practices to Support Identity And Equity in Learning
STEAM, or integrating art with STEM, can broaden participation in science learning. We will cover a set of core STEAM practices, developed in our work with both youth and educators, that support diverse learners and contribute to the creation of equitable learning environments.

 

Speakers

Nancy McIntyre (Robotics Education & Competition Foundation: Greenville, TX), Perrin Teal-Sullivan (University of Alaska Fairbanks: Fairbanks, AK), Jessica Strauss (Mabry Elementary School: Tampa, FL), David Rosengrant (University of South Florida St. Petersburg: St. Petersburg, FL)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Building a Classroom Community for ALL Students

McCormick Place - W184b-c

Creating an equitable classroom requires the creation of a learning community that integrates supports for all students to succeed. Learn how to use common strategies with intentionality to build a classroom community that supports sensemaking. In this session participants will learn strategies that allow you to take your students to the next level as a community.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how different strategies can be used to support ALL learners to create a community that learns together.

Speakers

Megan Elmore (Glenn Westlake Middle School: Lombard, IL), Randie Johnson (Glenn Westlake Middle School: Lombard, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Creating A Learning Community
Slides and resources for establishing a classroom community.
Presentation Resources
At this link you will find the presentation as well as resources for all activities discussed in presentation.
Part 2: Strategies in the Classroom
One lesson with lots of imbedded ideas that help all students. We will look through these and identify these helpful guides as well as have time to share more ideas from your classroom.

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Discussion-Based Learning: How to Use Talk as a Tool

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Academic discourse is a vital part of promoting student sensemaking. Learn how discourse can be used to promote equity and access in the science classroom.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to use discussion strategies in the classroom to move student thinking forward, use talk as a formative assessment, and build a classroom culture that promotes student discussion.

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Cheryl Knight (Orland Junior High School: Orland Park, IL)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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From Phenomenon to Figuring It Out

McCormick Place - W473

Sponsoring Company: Cereal City Science

Experience how to teach and learn across disciplines. Participate in figuring out K-2 and 3-5 science lessons designed to cross multiple literacy disciplines and build knowledge across grade levels. While figuring out phenomenon, participants develop models, talk about it, read about it, and write about it. Modeling becomes the scaffold for reading, writing and language. Learn best practices that will help students read text, produce text, and present their reasoning.

Takeaways: Students as scientists work together to discuss, read, write, and model to figure out a phenomenon.

Speakers

Sandra Erwin (Cereal City Science: Battle Creek, MI)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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TEST Speed Sharing: Creating a Classroom Culture That Supports Equitable Participation

McCormick Place - W183a

Join the members of NSTA as they share how to create a classroom culture that supports equitable participation, and learn how to implement these best practices within your own classroom. A roundtable discussion will follow.

Takeaways: Sharing of ideas on creating a classroom culture that supports equitable participation

Speakers

Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/k3k8DzZ6ckE_E

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Global Conversations: International Film Festival and Share-a-thon

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 21

In this self-directed session, you will be able to: Interact with educators in face-to-face poster presentations; Watch short video submissions from educators around the world; and Participate in hands-on/minds-on, takeaway learning experiences.

Takeaways: Science education occurs everywhere on this planet. We can get ideas and best practices from collegues around the world.

Speakers

Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Let Your Inner STEM Grow

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 25

You can't grow a flower without seeds, just like students can't grow their STEM identity without a growth mindset.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn why growth mindset is a vital aspect of the foundation of students' STEM identity.

Speakers

Nicole Hebert (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Abigail Lupinacci (Student: , 0)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Integrating Science and Literacy in Elementary Teaching Programs: Evaluating Pre-Service Teachers' Use of the Touch-Talk-Text Teaching Model

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 11

Elementary preservice teachers integrate science and literacy with the Touch-Talk-Text interdisciplinary framework, allowing ALL students to access science through sensory, language, and discourse connections.

Takeaways: Attendees will gain insight into strategies for integrating science and literacy in the elementary school day, addressing issues of decreased time and resources for elementary science learning.

Speakers

Danielle Scharen (North Carolina State University: Raleigh, NC)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Evaluating Pre-Service Teachers Use of the Touch-Talk-Text Teaching Model

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Beyond the Chocolates! Using grants to fund your classroom projects.

McCormick Place - W193a

The objective of this workshop is to guide educators through a mock grant-writing process. We will begin the session by discussing the grant process from proposal requests to awards. We will discuss misconceptions such as tax-exempt status requirements, time constraints, deliverables, project impact, collaboration, and more. Participants will have the opportunity to go through the process by searching for grants and completing a mock proposal. They will be provided with “step by step” guides to help them design a project, clarify their project objectives, create a budget, and determine the impact for their students, schools, and community. Participants will present their proposals and provide peer-to-peer feedback during the discussion part of the session.

Takeaways: How to write a grant proposal for a classroom project.

Speakers

Emilia Odife (Lake Mary Preparatory School: Lake Mary, FL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Beyond the Chocolates
Grant writing for educators.
Beyond the Chocolates- Grant Writing for Educators
Beyond the Chocolates- Grant Writing for Educators

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Leveraging the Last Dimension: Crosscutting Concepts Across Grade Levels

McCormick Place - W184a

In this workshop, participants will engage in an activity demonstrating the power of the CCCs as a tool for guiding student thinking and teacher collaboration.

Takeaways: The CCCs can be used as a tool to reach a desired learning objective while also vertically collaborating around the grade level–specific details they encompass.

Speakers

Sarah Stults (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL), Chandra James (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL), Saswati Koya (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Creating K-6 STEM Classrooms That Embrace Science Inquiry: Helping Students Think and Work Like Scientists - Exploring, Asking Questions, and Seeking Sense-Making of Scientific Phenomena

McCormick Place - W178a

Science inquiry is a powerful process and learning environment that embraces exploration and sense-making, as students question phenomena and explore real world science/STEM. Inquiry is an “attitude” that seeks understanding and continually questions how our natural world works. Student achievement, engagement, and sense-making of phenomena, increase when students are taught in an instructional environment that embraces inquiry, where students are encouraged to ask questions, gather evidence, seek answers, and formulate explanations. Speaker will discuss the many varied ways that inquiry manifests itself in the elementary STEM classroom, including ways to increase participation of ELL’s. She will actively engage participants, as she shares strategies and lesson ideas that promote inquiry, and as she demonstrates effective questioning, modeling how to guide students in their own questioning and explorations, as they gather data, formulate their explanations, and draw conclusions. Speaker will emphasize the importance of ‘testing’ the ‘known’, as well as the ‘unknown’, so students can validate their processes and thinking. Creating environments of inclusivity, collaboration, cooperation, and sharing of ideas will be emphasized. Participants will embrace the power that inquiry offers: content, strategies, process, engagement, and the desire to ask, answer, and understand scientific phenomena. This session will help teachers establish effective classroom practices, guiding students in understanding the ways scientists think and study our natural world, as teachers nurture students’ sustained curiosity and love of science/STEM. Handouts.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to create STEM classroom environments that fully embrace and create the inquiry process: emphasizing explorations, the formulation of questions to guide student inquiry and their understanding of scientific phenomena, the importance of collaborative sense-making and assuring the inclusivity of ALL students, the importance of assisting ELL’s with language accessibility, and the fulfillment of learner curiosity as part of the sense-making process and as a trajectory for guiding their continual learning.

Speakers

Donna Knoell (Educational and Technology Consultant: Overland Park, KS)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Engage in teacher developed activities that will allow your students to experience

McCormick Place - W184d

In this session, the participants will explore some lessons developed by teachers in the National Space Biomedical Research Institute-Teacher Academy Project (NSBRI-TAP). These are interactive, physical and focus on spatial disorientation and the musculoskeletal system as affected by microgravity. The teachers will engage in the activities and collect sample data as they would with students and interpret the results. These are both educational and fun as we need to desperately restore enthusiasm for science studies. The presenter has anecdotal stories from many astronauts of their physiological reaction to microgravity conditions that he will share. Teachers will be provided lesson plans and worksheets for use with their students. Sample activities: Title: IN-FLIGHT EXERCISES Grade Level: 5-8 Content Area: Life Science and Health National Science Content Standards: Standard A. Science as Inquiry (Grades 5-8 & 9-12) • Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry • Understandings about scientific inquiry Standard C. Life Science (Grades 5-8) • Structure and function in living systems • Regulation and behavior Standard F. Science in Personal and Social Perspectives (Grades 5-8 & 9-12) • Personal health Title: SHIFTY EYES Grade Level: 5-8 Content Area: Space/Life Science National Science Content Standards: Unifying Concepts and Processes (Grades 5-8) Models Standard C. Life Science (Grades 5-8) Structure and function in living systems Regulation and behavior Diversity and adaptations of organisms Dr. Wilson also participated in two experiments on NASA’s KC-135 (Vomit Comet): 1) testing a resistance exercise machine to fly in space designed at The Cleveland Clinic and 2) an experiment where the corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea) was subjected to microgravity while a control group of worms was grown by elementary students in Las Cruces, NM. He will explain and share the results of these experiments and of one flown by teachers from Miami-Dade School District in Florida involved in his Future Scientists Program.

Takeaways: The International Space Station (ISS) is a research platform and is helping scientists develop countermeasures to the adverse effects of long-duration spaceflight on the human body.

Speakers

Craig Wilson (Texas A&M University: College Station, TX)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA2022teacherinfo.docx
background information and simple worksheets to collect data

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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NASA Elementary GLOBE: Water Exploration Experience

McCormick Place - W178b

This is an inquiry-based hands-on NASA STEM lesson based on a free storybook The Mystery at Willow Creek. All participants can learn from this experience regardless of level. The STEM activities incorporate cooperative learning and exploration. The session activity is versatile and can be used as a standalone or incorporated into complex units. The participants will receive 4 mystery samples. They will use their senses and pH paper to identify the samples with “pollution” and the one that is water. The PowerPoint will include the videos and activities including the tips and pointers and will be made available to all participants. The teacher’s guide is available online at no cost on http://www.globe.gov/web/elementary-globe. The teacher’s guide includes the free storybooks, activities, material lists, Instructional strategies, assessments, and cross-curricular implementation. Session Overview: 10 min- STEM Engagement strategies: Getting Organized 5 min- The Importance of Fresh Water 10 min- Introduce “Discoveries at Willow Creek” storybook 20 min- Activity: “Water Detectives Activity” –Using our senses 10 min – Reporting out -Why we are collecting water data? 5 min- Q and A

Takeaways: NASA Elementary GLOBE has free storybooks with three or more STEM Activities each integrating the Core Standards with the Science standards. The materials are translated into 5 languages. Exploring the environment with a field experience ( Water Walk) will engage students in real-world culturally relevant problem-solving.

Speakers

Susan Kohler (NASA Glenn Research Center: Cleveland, OH)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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"Are These Materials Designed for NGSS?" Understanding the EdReports Review Process (Grades K-8)

McCormick Place - W183a

EdReports science review is a by educator, for educator process that involves K-8 educators in the review of full year K-8 instructional materials that claim alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). This session will open by sharing research on the challenges educators face in finding quality materials and detail how EdReports aims to address those challenges. Participants will receive an overview of the science review tools, their creation, and components for both grades K-5 and 6-8 and examine characteristics of alignment to the NGSS and usability. They will engage in large group, small group, and pair share conversations to reflect on local priorities and to inform their own local adoption efforts. Educators will also learn about opportunities to engage as an EdReports reviewer in upcoming reviews, which includes NGSS training, an extended learning community, and a paid stipend for participation.

Takeaways: Attendees will build an understanding of the challenges educators face in finding quality materials and how EdReports supports educators to address those challenges, through resources supporting smart adoption processes and opportunities to participate in educator-led review teams.

Speakers

Shannon Wachowski (EdReports.org: Fort Collins, CO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Chicago 2022 K-8 V2.pdf

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Developing Scientific Literacy in the Elementary Grades Through Integrating Content and Sensemaking

McCormick Place - W183b

In this session, attendees will extend their understanding of learning design for the NGSS specifically focused on developing scientific literacy in the elementary grades. Participants will learn about selecting instructional phenomena and/or problems that can effectively anchor student learning experiences and create authentic needs for students to engage deeply with other content areas to make sense of phenomena and design solutions to problems, thus supporting meaningful integration of science with other STEM and content areas. Attendees will explore ways to design for elementary learning that meets at the intersection of three-dimensional standards, phenomena/problem driven learning, sensemaking, and integration. Participants will also be connected to a variety of Open Education Resources (OERs) and other freely available resources that support integrated elementary learning design.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how anchoring learning in phenomena and problems and leveraging integrated content as sensemaking resources for students supports scientific literacy development in grades K-5.

Speakers

Kimberley Astle (Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction: Olympia, WA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Developing Scientific Literacy in the Elementary Grades Through Integrating Content and Sensemaking 1 hour.pptx

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Making Quality Science and STEM Instruction Accessible and Equitable for ALL K-6 Students: Employing Differentiation Strategies and Resources to Advance Achievement, Engagement, Assure Inclusivity, and Meet the Unique Needs of ALL Learners

McCormick Place - W178a

Educators have a mandate to provide quality science/STEM instruction for ALL students, but making instruction accessible to every student presents enormous challenges. In order to teach students with broad ranging abilities and experiences, differentiating science/STEM instruction is imperative. We must differentiate instruction to accommodate the differences in readiness and background knowledge, fluency and facility with English, differences in learning styles, and the broad range of student interests that comprise our schools. Accessibility, inclusivity, and collaboration must be assured for special needs and ELL learners, whose instructional needs can definitely be accommodated with effective differentiation strategies and resources. When teachers differentiate, they enhance learning, creating environments where instruction and assessment are matched to student abilities and needs. Differentiation is an approach involving numerous strategies, while students all access the same curriculum. Content, process, and products can all be differentiated. Students who lack experience and background knowledge can have targeted instruction, to provide hands-on explorations and build knowledge. Likewise, gifted students can extend and expand their science/STEM experiences, keeping them challenged and interested. Presenter will offer strategies and exploration ideas, tiered assignments that increase levels of complexity, instructional grouping and collaboration techniques, and suggest a variety of resources, to enable teachers to advance and evaluate student learning for ALL children. Attendees will actively engage with discourse and exploration of hands-on resources.

Takeaways: 1. Attendees will learn differentiation strategies to engage all learners actively with hands-on explorations, assuring collaboration and accessibility for ALL, incorporating collaborative explorations where students of varying abilities share the learning experience, to advance learning and deepen conceptual understanding and sense-making for all K-6 students.

Speakers

Donna Knoell (Educational and Technology Consultant: Overland Park, KS)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way of doing the right thing

McCormick Place - W175c

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way to engage the community in STEM. Participants will hear from educators that have won money for their school and communities to implement STEM action projects.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how they can receive cash awards and acknowledge for STEM action projects.

Speakers

John Anderson (Toshiba America Foundation: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Transforming Teaching Through Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Carnegie Corporation of New York released a challenge paper calling on the education field to transform teaching and learning through the elements and essentials of curriculum-based professional learning. Learn how schools and systems are helping teachers experience the instruction their students experience to help change instructional practices, leading to better student outcomes.

Takeaways: 1. Explore the rationale for a challenge paper dedicated solely to the issue of curriculum-based professional learning; 2. Discover the 10 elements and three essentials of professional learning critical to effective implementation of high-quality science instructional materials; and 3. Consider implications of the roles and responsibilities for putting into action the elements of curriculum-based professional learning.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Classroom Communities that Thrive through Camaraderie and Connection

McCormick Place - W185a

It takes time and intentionality to build a community of learners who trust each other, respect differing perspectives, share ideas freely, and seek feedback from their peers. This session explores a variety of strategies that can be easily implemented to build this culture and community from day one. Strategies that foster this type of connection, collaboration, and camaraderie will be discussed using examples and tips to implement in the classroom, starting with some fresh ideas for getting to know students and helping them get to know their classmates. Many of these ideas combine strategies we already know and add a collaborative and inclusive spin to them. Allowing for multiple types of student interaction is important to ensure all voices are heard and valued, not just the loud and proud. Including time for students to process independently, in small groups, and in the large group is important to developing an inclusive community. A variety of strategies will be shared to support these levels of interaction in the classroom, making student thinking visible in individual, small group, and whole group displays.

Takeaways: Teachers can elevate their practices to include all students and develop a classroom culture that invites student interaction, increases student engagement, and fosters equitable experiences on a daily basis.

Speakers

Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Classroom Communities that Thrive through Camaraderie and Connection Folder

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Using Make-It! Take-It! Science Kits to Support Sensemaking

McCormick Place - W192a

Sponsoring Company: hand2mind

Make-It! Take-It! activities don't need to be just for STEM night. These can become part of your instruction for concept development. We'll explore an example and view it through the lens of a hands-on investigation for concept development and sensemaking. You’ll receive a sample lesson and a chance to win a STEM Make-It Take-It kit.

Takeaways: Invite students to notice, wonder, and investigate different scientific phenomena.

Speakers

Pam Caffery (hand2mind: Vernon Hills, IL)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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STEM is LIT!

McCormick Place - W193a

Through the 2021-2022 school year, Pulaski County Special School District sought to scale inclusive STEM experiences throughout grades K-5. Considering the need for sense-making opportunities provided in an inclusive and culturally relevant environment, a new districtwide initiative was birthed- STEM is Lit! STEM is LIT! seeks to take culturally relevant literature as the framework for authentic STEM experiences through sense-making practices. The idea is simple. Find a culturally relevant and diverse piece of literature. Frame a STEM challenge experience around this piece of literature. Design authentic lesson plans and resources for teachers to implement these challenges in their schools. Organize your supplies. Support your teachers and students. By creating districtwide monthly STEM challenges for all students in grades K-5, PCSSD was able to integrate literacy with mathematical sense-making, scientific inquiry, and the engineering design process creating memories that will last a life time. In addition to monthly challenges, STEM is Lit! also became the driving bus behind the Deputy Superintendent's book club for all 4th graders throughout the district, where a special STEM challenge was added and performed at each elementary in the district. This presentation seeks to share those authentic practices that can be scaled in any district to expose broad elementary audiences to equitable STEM experiences and conversation.

Takeaways: How can districts expand STEM experiences through culturally relevant and inclusive practices in a large-scaled initiative?

Speakers

Justin Luttrell (Pulaski County Special School District: Little Rock, AR), Alesia Smith (Pulaski County Special School District: Littel Rock, AR)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

STEM is LIT!

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Problem Centered Teaching by Tomorrow

McCormick Place - W193a

Problem centered instruction is a great way to engage students, integrate content, inspire learning, and naturally incorporate all three dimensions of the NRC Framework. However, true problem centered instruction requires a major shift in both teaching and learning, requiring the one thing teachers don't have: time--the last thing teachers need is another pedagogical strategy that disrupts their entire routine. Teachers will have the opportunity to voice their concerns and discuss some barriers of problem centered teaching and learning, while also addressing the benefits for both teachers and students. Considering the benefits, there are some immediate changes that teachers can use to help shift to a problem centered environment. Recalling that problem centered learning should be complex, meaningful, and open-ended, the four strategies are: 1) Make the Content Relatable, 2) Structure: Less is More, 3) Be a Resource, Not an Answer Key, and 4) Use a Problem to Introduce a Topic. Teachers will then have an opportunity to put the strategies to immediate use by picking a lesson or topic and work with others to transform it into a three-dimensional, problem centered lesson.

Takeaways: Teachers will explore four strategies that promote three-dimensional learning through the process of problem centered instruction that is complex, meaningful, and open-ended. They will discuss benefits and barriers to the problem centered approach from the perspective of both the instructor and the learner. Teachers will have an opportunity to brainstorm and work collaboratively on transforming a lesson or topic of their choice into a problem centered, reality based scenario that seamlessly integrates the Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas.

Speakers

Cassandra Armstrong (Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy: Aurora, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation Link

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Instructional Materials Design for Today's Science Standards

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

One of the most important factors for ensuring that all students experience science education that prepares them for future success is access to high-quality, standards-aligned instructional materials, especially critical for our nation’s Black, Latinx, multilingual, and low-income students. EdReports and NextGenScience provide evaluations of instructional materials to help identify these kinds of high-quality materials. The organizations co-developed the Critical Features of Instructional Materials Design resource to illustrate and provide unified definitions of features that ensure instructional materials can help students meet or exceed today’s science standards. The features described in this document are based on approaches to science learning and assessment described in A Framework for K–12 Science Education and subsequent research. This session leverages key features and illustrations to engage educators and developers in a conversation about the features and what they look like in materials.

Takeaways: Attendees will develop an understanding of the importance of high quality materials for supporting students and teachers and discuss how to utilize the critical curriculum features for improving development and selection of curriculum materials.

Speakers

Jenny Sarna (Director, NextGenScience: , 0), Shannon Wachowski (EdReports.org: Fort Collins, CO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Critical Features Webinar Slide Deck_NSTA Chicago 2022.pptx.pdf

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Cultural Competence Matters: Improving Cultural Competence through Effective Interpersonal Communication

McCormick Place - W185b-c

Culturally relevant pedagogy embodies a professional, political, cultural, ethnical, and ideological disposition that supersedes mundane teaching acts; it is centered in fundamental beliefs about teaching, learning, students, their families, and their communities, and an unyielding commitment to see student success become less rhetoric and more of a reality. This session will aid in building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning. In this session, we will exhibit how to identify the key characteristics of culturally responsive lessons. Attendees will acquire lesson design methods that employ cultural competence and effective communication. Attendees will use collaborate boards during the presentation to respond and interact. Activities to exhibit how students identify with what they know in the classroom will be utilized to help educators make connections and apply this information when planning lessons.

Takeaways: Building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning.

Speakers

Kelly Haynes (Baker High School: Baker, LA), Jennifer Norwood (Instructional Support Specialist: , 0), Tara Hollins (Exceptional Student Services Educator: Zachary, LA)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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How do science teachers stay effective? Practical implications and strategies based on research

McCormick Place - W176c

This presentation will use a mixture of hands-on activities and discussion questions to engage participants in the themes from research about how science teachers stay effective during challenging times For example, through our research, we have found science teachers often have a strong desire to help their students become better people and create an equitable classroom. They describe that they have goals for their students such as being critical thinkers, problem-solvers, creative, and collaborative. Our session will work to have the participants generate the types of attributes they want in their own students. We will then demonstrate two teaching scenarios: one based on best practices in science education and the other being a teacher-centered approach. We will have participants then analyze the teaching scenarios using the goals they have to determine which has more culturally responsive teaching practices. We will also engage students in a hands-on activity using a gravity well that connects to MS-PS2-4. We will use the activity to discuss culturally responsive teaching practices in science teaching including scaffolding, effective questioning, a method to analyze teaching, and using experiences and phenomena to help students deeply engage in all three dimensions of the NGSS.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about inclusive teaching strategies that help science teachers stay effective.

Speakers

Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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The Science of Student Engagement- How stress and the brain affect learning

McCormick Place - W181c

Students find science difficult or non-stimulating particularly when teachers do not consider cognitive, physiological, and socio-emotional disparities in students. Research has shown that engaging the appropriate parts of the brain helps students make a long-lasting, personalized connection to scientific concepts and practices. Studies show that discipline and learning problems in our classrooms may be associated with a lack of student engagement. Engaged students are less likely to be disruptive and are more likely to retain information longer. The focus of this presentation is to equip teachers with the pedagogical skills and strategies needed to drive student engagement and achievement by recognizing and addressing physiological, cognitive, and socio-emotional disparities in students based on an understanding of how a learner’s brain works. Participating teachers will explore the impact of emotions, storytelling, culturally relevant and hands-on learning on the forebrain and consequently on student engagement and comprehension. Teachers will learn to correctly harness the learning power of the forebrain, particularly, those of the hippocampus and amygdala, by appropriately employing suitable learning strategies. These will enhance student engagement, improve learning outcomes and increase academic achievement in the sciences.

Takeaways: Teachers will learn to correctly harness the learning power of the forebrain, particularly, those of the hippocampus and amygdala, by appropriately employing suitable learning strategies

Speakers

Chidi Duru (Prince George's County Public Schools: Upper Marlboro, MD)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Science Is Social! Student Ideas at the Center of Phenomenon-Driven, Three-Dimensional Teaching and Learning (Elementary)

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Explore how NSTA’s phenomena-driven lessons/units motivate students to engage in science practices to make sense of science ideas they need to explain how or why the phenomenon occurs.

Takeaways: 1. Understand the critical attributes of sensemaking; 2. Strategies for intentional sequences of student interactions to provide access to participation and learning for all students; and 3. Students’ strategic use of modalities (talk, text, gestures, drawings, etc.).

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Engaging Preservice Elementary Teachers in Making Sense of Sensemaking in Science

McCormick Place - W179a

Strategies from a teacher educator that foster sensemaking and three-dimensional learning with preservice elementary teachers using immersive content experiences highlighting instructional methods and metacognition.

Takeaways: When preservice teachers/teachers are given the opportunity to experience and analyze sensemaking in the context of grade-level learning experiences, they are better prepared to foster sensemaking in their classroom.

Speakers

Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Engaging Preservice Teachers in Making Sense of Sensemaking Presentation Folder

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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A Museum’s Approach to Making Sense of Chicago’s Urban Ecosystem

McCormick Place - W186a

In this workshop, participants will explore Chicago Academy of Sciences/Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum program models that use local, real world phenomena and object based learning to center student sensemaking. We will examine how our curriculum development process leverages local urban spaces, local specimens from both our living and preserved collections, and the work of museum conservation scientists to create opportunities for students to engage in rigorous and authentic science practice. We’ll unpack how a local focus increases both relevance and accessibility. We’ll reflect on the role of iteration in sensemaking, on the benefits of building in routines for revising explanations that allow teachers - and students - to trust the power of these collaboratively constructed student ideas to drive the learning. During the workshop, teachers will experience as learners how the wonder and inclusivity of local natural phenomena provide rigorous and accessible starting points for student driven inquiry. Finally, we will explore how learning ecosystems that connect in school learning with personal experiences can foster positive attitudes toward nature and science, and strategize opportunities for leveraging local natural spaces, institutions and resources to connect students to authentic sensemaking experiences.

Takeaways: Participants will explore phenomena grounded in Chicago's urban ecosystems and strategize opportunities for leveraging local natural spaces, institutions and resources to connect students to authentic sensemaking experiences.

Speakers

Yukako Kawakatsu (Chicago Academy of Sciences/Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum: Chicago, IL), Melissa Siska (Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum: Chicago, IL)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Designing and Using Three-Dimensional Assessment in the Classroom

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

This session focuses on practical application of three-dimensional assessment to evaluate student learning.

Takeaways: Participants will gain a stronger understanding of how to use three-dimensional assessments to evaluate student learning.

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Bridina Lemmer (Illinois Science Teaching Association: Jacksonville, IL)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Phenomenon-based Instruction - Unpacking the 3-D NGSS

McCormick Place - W180

Unpacking the 3-D NGSS while at the same time making science instruction engaging to students is a challenge faced by science teachers across the nation. With skillful use of phenomena-based instruction, science teachers engage students by converting what the teacher planned to teach into what the students want to learn. Culturally relevant, intellectually accessible and thought-provoking phenomena enable students to make engaging connections between the required curricula content and real-life scenarios and applications. Rather than recalling discrete facts, students apply new information and use transferable problem-solving skills to explain a natural or man-made phenomenon. Phenomenon-based science encourages students to ask questions, discover connections, and design models to make sense of what they observe. This session provides participating teachers opportunities to experience lessons in the same manner as students will. They examine a phenomenon and then ask questions, collaborate with partners and design models, and discuss digital tools that can be used to engage students in phenomenon-based learning. Teachers learn how to use questioning techniques and academic dialogue to spike discontent in the students' understanding of the phenomena, thereby, driving students to use science practices to further explore their curiosities

Takeaways: Help teachers to develop and deploy thought-provoking phenomena that will promote student engagement, comprehension, and achievement in the sciences by transforming what the teacher planned to teach into what the students are eager to learn.

Speakers

Chidi Duru (Prince George's County Public Schools: Upper Marlboro, MD)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Going Beneath the Surface: Using socioscientific issues to help students engage in 3D learning.

McCormick Place - W185a

Socioscientific issues are scientific topics that require students to engage in meaningful discussions (Zeidler & Nichols, 2009). Additionally, engaging students in socioscientific issues can promote equity, diversity, and help students question biases (Goldsmith et al., 2021). Importantly, these issues are often most likely to promote inclusivity if students have a connection with them. Considering we live in the Midwest, we often use socioscientific issues surrounding agricultural practices. We start with a phenomenon that introduces the example socioscientific issue by showing a video about tilling. We then ask, “Should farmers till the land?” To explore this question, we engage participants by jigsawing four different hands-on activities related to the soil. Participants will explore compact vs. loose soil, reducing water erosion, reducing erosion caused by wind and snow, and the effect of a heat lamp on the temperature of soil. Participants will use science and engineering practices such as planning and carrying out investigations and analyzing and interpreting data. We will debrief the activities and model how we help students make sense of the science ideas. We will finish the presentation by discussing how to find suitable socioscientific issues, include culturally responsive teaching practices, and provide some strategies for integrating with the NGSS.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about how to use socioscientific issues and culturally responsive practices to engage students with social issues that require scientific knowledge.

Speakers

Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Object-Based Inquiry in the Multilingual Classroom

McCormick Place - W179b

In this workshop, Field Museum educators and Chicago Public School teachers will share their experience using object-based learning in the classroom and how it sparks curiosity and language development in multilingual students. Field Museum educators will give an overview of the tenets of object-based inquiry and how it lends itself to giving equitable access to content for all students. Chicago Public School teachers will explain the practical application and benefits of using object-based learning in their multilingual classrooms and highlight how science ideas and language development occurs naturally through discussion, question-asking, and scientific drawing. During the hands-on workshop, participants will act as a learner in a guided object-based inquiry lesson that focuses on including everyday phenomena. Following the hands-on experience, they will have the opportunity to share how they would integrate object-based learning in their own curriculum. Participants will create their own collection of learning objects to use in their classroom.

Takeaways: Educators will learn how to merge science ideas with student ideas in their classroom using object-based phenomena to deepen students' questioning and observation skills. Educators will learn how to use object-based learning in their ELL or bilingual classrooms to promote language and content acquisition. Educators will learn how to use objects as hands-on learning tools to provide equitable learning opportunities for all.

Speakers

Mireya Becker (The Field Museum: Chicago, IL), Damaris Cami (Dual Language Teacher: Chicago, IL), Eleanor Sweeney (Educator: Chicago, IL), Andrea McGehee (Educator: Chicago, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Object-Based Inquiry for the Multilingual Classroom.pptx