OpenSciEd  - Carolina (P-U from March)
 

2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Wednesday, July 20
8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
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SC-1: Developing and Using Three-Dimensional Assessment Tasks to Support NGSS Instruction

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Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Hyde Park A/B

Ticket Price:

  • $75 earlybird
  • $100 advance

If you have not yet registered for the conference, you may purchase tickets when you register online.

Please note that if you are already registered for the conference and wish to purchase this ticket, click the "add to cart" button above.

Assessment tasks for NGSS classrooms are different from the typical tasks that require students to recall what they know. A Framework for K–12 Science Education and the NGSS call for assessment tasks that ask students to use and apply the three dimensions of science proficiency: disciplinary core ideas, scientific and engineering practices, and crosscutting concepts. With three-dimensional tasks, the expectation is that students will use and apply the three dimensions of science proficiency together to make sense of phenomena or solve problems.

In this session, we focus on designing three-dimensional assessment tasks for classroom use with an emphasis on assessment for teaching and learning. A good assessment task should provide actionable information of value to teachers and their students. Importantly, it should provide insight into how students are building toward an NGSS performance expectation.

How can we use performance expectations to construct assessment tasks that can be used during instruction? Participants will learn an approach for designing three-dimensional assessment tasks and explore how to use them formatively in classrooms to help students build toward the performance expectations.

Participants will also be able to preorder our assessment book Creating and Using Instructionally Supportive Assessments in NGSS Classrooms.

Takeaways: Participants will learn: 1. what is meant by three-dimensional assessment; 2. how to design classroom-based assessment tasks aligned with the NGSS; and 3. how to make use of formative assessment tasks to support instruction.

Speakers

Joseph Krajcik (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI), Christopher Harris (K-12 Alliance/WestEd: Redwood City, CA)

Wednesday, July 20
11:45 AM - 12:45 PM
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Lunch: Elements of Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Regency Ballroom

By Invitation Only

Shifting from traditional professional development to curriculum-based professional learning is a simple concept but complex to design and execute well. At its core, it means teachers experience the same kind of inquiry-based learning we expect them to provide their students. Learn more about a Carnegie Corporation of New York report, The Elements, which identifies a core set of research-based actions, approaches, and enabling conditions that effective schools and systems have put in place to reinforce and amplify the power of high-quality curriculum and skillful teaching.

Takeaways: 1. Examine beliefs and assumptions regarding the relationship between high-quality instructional materials, curriculum-based professional learning and student success 2. Gain understanding of the foundation for The Elements, a challenge paper from Carnegie Corporation of New York 3. Learn from science practitioners whose successful curriculum implementation efforts are grounded in the elements and essentials.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Wednesday, July 20
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
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SC-2: Supporting Teachers and Students in the Science Classroom Using NSTA’s Instructional Coaching Tools and Protocols

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Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Hyde Park A/B

Ticket Price:

  • $75 earlybird
  • $100 advance

If you have not yet registered for the conference, you may purchase tickets when you register online.

Please note that if you are already registered for the conference and wish to purchase this ticket, click the "add to cart" button above.

This workshop is designed for instructional coaches and leaders who want to support their teachers in making the instructional shifts required by three-dimensional science standards. Participants will receive NSTA’s suite of instructional coaching tools and gain experience using the protocols and providing feedback.

Takeaways: 1. Become familiar with a suite of instructional coaching tools and protocols; 2. Gain experience using the instructional coaching tools and protocols; and 3. Identify ways to use the tools to provide feedback to teachers and document growth over time.

Speakers

Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/M85g4eNS_sCs_E

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a Brand New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

Since its release, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the NGSS has become an essential tool for many educators across the country. A new version titled the Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimension has been developed to not only support teachers in all states that have standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education. This new version of the Quick-Reference Guide still contains the most useful features of the original, including descriptions of the practices and the crosscutting concepts from the Framework of K-12 Science Education and K-12 progressions of the elements of all three dimensions. In addition, the new Quick-Reference Guide contains several new features that should make it even more helpful. For example, every element now has a unique code (based on the codes in the NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions) that makes it much easier to reference a particular element. In addition, there is an entire chapter devoted to the Performance Expectations. Finally, the guide also contains a number of tools for working with standards. This session will outline all of the features of the guide through the process of unpacking the crosscutting concepts to better understand how to make curriculum, instruction, and assessment more three-dimensional.

Takeaways: A deeper understanding of the Crosscutting Concepts and how a well-designed reference guide can make it easier to unpack the three dimensions for work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

Speakers

Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Universal Design for Learning (UDL) - An Effective Approach to Ensuring an Inclusive Science Classroom

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines are a tool that can be used to design learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners (CAST, 2018). Instructional designers and teachers can use these principles to create learning environments that reduce barriers to access for all students, while keeping in mind the learning goals of the lesson. The three guiding principles of UDL are engagement, representation, and action and expression. In this session educators will be provided with examples of these principles in action in sample materials from OpenSciEd and classroom videos. In these examples, participating will identify how the materials have been purposefully designed with multiple avenues for engagement, representation, and action and expression. Additionally, they will identify the built-in supports for teachers to highlight student assets and to address potential barriers to learning for their local student population. Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

Takeaways: Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

Speakers

Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Now I see it! Now I get it!

McCormick Place - W184d

Without out a doubt the recent pandemic has demonstrated that, the efforts in the science classroom towards scientific literacy are more relevant than ever. In this session participants will learn simple effective visual literacy tools and strategies that make learning science visible to all students, supporting diversity and reinforcing scientific literacy skills that help students make sense of the world. The strategies and tools used in this presentation will highlight the need to incorporate visual literacy as current brain research shows that around 60% of information we process every day comes in visual form. Sometimes chunking content to smaller learning bites can lower the understanding of concepts and ideas, especially if these concepts are abstract in nature; learning how to maximize the use of visuals both student and teacher made supports deeper understanding not just on a particular concept but of how they are connected making sense of the world. These strategies support cultural competency as they support learner diversity while working on scientific literacy skills such as use of evidence/data, pose questions, find answers. By having a common visual as point of reference along with strategy and tools not only closes the gap on background knowledge and makes accessible to all students but also helps student and teachers have meaningful discourse highlighting students strengths to solve real world problems.

Takeaways: In this session participants will learn simple effective visual literacy tools and strategies that make learning science visible to all students, supporting diversity and reinforcing scientific literacy skills that help students make sense of the world.

Speakers

Marjorie Miles Dozier (Polk County Public Schools: Bartow, FL)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Using Online Investigations with Digitized Specimens to Enhance Data Literacy and Scientific Reasoning

McCormick Place - W181c

Online investigations with digitized specimens offer broad opportunities for teachers to engage their students in authentic scientific research. EPIC Bioscience investigations are free, online, NGSS-aligned research investigations that guide students to participate in science practices: asking a question, collecting data, analyzing and interpreting findings, and communicating to others. Investigations use specimens from natural history collections in entomology, vertebrate zoology, mycology, and botany to provide fully-supported, online investigations centered on real phenomena and aligned to NGSS MSLS2-1 through NGSS MSLS2-4. These investigations offer key opportunities to enhance scientific literacy through effective sensemaking with student-collected data on compelling specimens. This session focuses on two key goals to help teachers support sensemaking during phenomena-based student investigations: (1) Identifying and remediating common student errors and confusion during data collection and analysis. (2) Practicing effective instructional strategies focused on enhancing students’ scientific reasoning and data interpretation. This session will involve hands-on experiences with student activities, as well as interactive discussion of classroom examples and evidence.

Takeaways: Identify common student errors and sources of confusion during data collection, analysis, and interpretation and deploy strategies designed to enhance student sensemaking from data.

Speakers

Kirsten Butcher (The University of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT), Madlyn Larson (Natural History Museum of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

EPIC Bioscience - Specimen Measurement Guide
A visual guide to measuring specimens, with examples and non-examples.
EPIC Bioscience - Data Interpretation Guide
Visual student guide to interpreting data patterns, with examples and non-examples.

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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The Meaning Beyond the Words

McCormick Place - W178a

For years, research on the language of classrooms explored how the way we say things impacts students’ sense of belonging. This session uses the NSTA Teacher Tip Tuesday—The Meaning Beyond The Words: How Language, Race, and Culture Impact Science Teaching and Learning web seminar to consider how we signal to students that we value their ideas and how they communicate those ideas in the science classroom and what we can do as educators to help ensure our students know they belong in the classroom and can do science. Participants will learn about opportunities to continue the learning after the session ends through NSTA’s new Professional Learning Units.

Takeaways: 1. Become aware of how we signal (or don’t signal) to students their ideas and how they communicate their ideas are valued in the science classroom; and 2. Learn strategies to support students in building on their ideas and each other's ideas to move toward building deep conceptual understanding of big ideas in science (disciplinary core ideas).

Speakers

Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/ktURlAGyUA4_E

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Broaden Science Participation: Unpack “Analyze & Interpret” to Teach Data As an Equalizer

McCormick Place - W179b

We live in a data-driven world, and our students will be working in a data-driven workforce. Therefore, it is critical that our Pre-K-12 students learn foundational data literacy skills. However, currently these skills are too often only taught in upper-level classes. All students need these skills and all students, down to our little Pre-Kers, can work with and make sense of science data. Let’s make sure data is an equalizer, rather than another divider in our educational system and society! Join us as we explore what perception and learning science tell us about how our brains process data. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources to build science knowledge and self-efficacy through data. Finally, we will explore ways to adapt our existing curriculum activities and data visualizations to help our students more equitably access science. Through hands-on activities and group discussions, participants will leave more empowered to leverage data and data visualizations into their science content in purposeful ways for all learners. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall 21st century skills. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

Takeaways: Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century for all students and ways to adjust existing curriculum to leverage data as entry points into science inquiry, sensemaking, and knowledge for all learners to see themselves in STEM.

Speakers

Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document and a slide deck from the workshop.

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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We Are All Explorers

McCormick Place - W184d

How are you engaging all students in critical skills to ensure they are ready for the future of work? What does the classroom feel, sound, and look like when students are making sense of their world and solving real-world problems? Join the alumni from the 2021 Northrop Grumman Foundation Teachers Academy as they share the ways they have transformed their schools/classrooms to align with the reality of work as experienced alongside engineers, technologists, and scientists.

Takeaways: Strategies to integrate workforce skills aligned with the vision of the K–12 Framework.

Speakers

Rachel Kenning (Spring Creek Middle School: Providence, UT), Anthony Carter (Middle River Middle School: Middle River, MD), Yevgeny Pevzner (Kearns Junior High School: Salt Lake City, UT), Leilani O'Dell (Roscomare Road Elementary School: No City, No State)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NGFTA Alumni--Workplace Skills

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Matter and Energy Learning Progressions in OpenSciEd High School Chemistry

McCormick Place - W196c

The forthcoming OpenSciEd High School chemistry course combines physical science and Earth and space science NGSS performance expectations as a way to engage students in developing understandings around energy and matter. Learn about the focus of the five units that make up this course and their associated performance expectation bundles to see how the three dimensions are used as a way to authentically engage students in making sense of both physical science and earth and space science related phenomena and design solutions. In the session, we will highlight how anchoring phenomena of the first unit, typically associated with earth and space science, helps students make sense of the particulate nature of matter, energy transfers in earth systems, feedback loops, and human interactions with their environment. An in-depth examination of the performance expectation bundles for the following four units will help illustrate the learning progressions students will follow to develop progressively more complex models of the particle nature of matter, its properties, and its interactions using the lenses of all crosscutting concepts, in particular, patterns, energy and matter, structure and function, and stability and change.

Takeaways: Incorporation of earth and space science NGSS performance expectations within a chemistry curriculum supports student engagement in and sensemaking of chemistry concepts around properties and interactions of matter and energy.

Speakers

Nicole Vick (Northwestern University: No City, No State), Dan Voss (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Tara McGill (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Chicago 2022 Chemistry Progressions.pdf

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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What Is Sensemaking? Exploration and Consensus-Building Tasks for Individuals and Teams

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Join us to learn what sensemaking is and how to use research-based resources to engage students in making sense of the world around them. Leave with a collection of resources to move your professional learning forward no matter where you are on the sensemaking continuum.

Takeaways: Develop an understanding of what sensemaking is and how it can help build classrooms where students are able to make sense of the world around them. Leaders walk away with a consensus-building exercise for their team.

Speakers

Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Elizabeth Allan (University of Central Oklahoma: Edmond, OK)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

McCormick Place - W185d

Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

Takeaways: Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

Speakers

Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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3D@NSTA: Strengthening Science Teaching Practice with CCCs

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

In this session, the co-editors of the recent NSTA Press book, Crosscutting Concepts: Strengthening Science and Engineering Learning, will take a deep dive into how crosscutting concepts can be more explicitly leveraged to strengthen science instruction. Presenters will illustrate how two instructional units—one elementary and one secondary—have developed CCCs as lenses on phenomena in order to better connect with students’ everyday experiences and to enhance students’ ability to meaningfully integrate SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs to make sense of authentic phenomena and problems.

Takeaways: CCCs are: 1) lenses on phenomena and problems; 2) critical to sensemaking about phenomena and problems; and 3) most useful when meaningfully integrated with SEPs and DCIs.

Speakers

Jeff Nordine (The University of Iowa: Iowa City, IA), Okhee Lee (New York University: New York, NY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA 2022 CCCs in 3D Learning PPT 7-21-22.pptx

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Using the NSTA Sensemaking Tool to Support Creating, Revising, and Selecting High-Quality Science Lessons

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Gain experience using the NSTA Sensmaking Tool to become critical consumers of curricular materials and support creating/revising lessons for sensemaking.

Takeaways: 1. Learn how to use the NSTA Sensemaking Tool to review science lessons for the four critical aspects of sensemaking; and 2. Understand how to use the Sensemaking Tool to support creating and revising existing science lessons for sensemaking.

Speakers

Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/x2paxwvcfUQ_E

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Crash Science: When Physics Meets Biology

McCormick Place - W185b-c

Use innovative video-assisted STEM activities, demonstrations, award-winning videos, and behind-the-crash-tests tours to teach the science of car crashes. Visit classroom.iihs.org for more information.

Takeaways: Participants learn how to incorporate culminating STEM design challenges (Project Pedestrian Sensors and Egg-Carrying Paper Car Crash) into their curriculum to promote student awareness and understanding of how engineering and technology are used to build safer vehicles.

Speakers

Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Engineer Physical Science Excitement with a Carolina STEM Challenge®

McCormick Place - W471a

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Apply creative problem-solving skills and engineering practices to chemistry and physical science challenges with race cars and rockets. Experience how Carolina makes it easy to incorporate STEM into your classroom.

Takeaways: Teachers will take away hands-on experience in designing, making, and testing balloon race cars and reaction rockets.

Speakers

Patti Kopkau (Retired Educator: National City, MI)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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When Cells Talk, Things Happen: Cell Signaling

McCormick Place - W475b

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

During this workshop, participants will work explore cell communication using hands-on models of synapses. Participants will experience how using models to explore abstract concepts deepens student understanding and inquiry for students and provides opportunities for formative assessments of student understanding. Participants will also have opportunities to deepen and challenge their own conceptual understanding of cell communication by altering the biochemical events within the synapses. These changes will reflect what happens when synapses are disturbed by drugs, including both prescription and drugs of abuse, as well as some mental health disorders. Finally, ideas for three-dimensional summative assessments will be explored.

Takeaways: Hands on models of synapses let students explore cell communication and the structure and function relationship of proteins and signaling molecules including toxins and drugs.

Speakers

Kim Parfitt (3D Molecular Designs: Milwaukee, WI)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Workshop Resources

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Including Teachers in Developing Large-Scale Assessments for Science

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Learn about the novel approach taken by Illinois to include teacher voice in developing a statewide three-dimensional science assessment.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about the process of developing a state-wide assessment written by local educators.

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Harvey Henson (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL), Angela Box (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Chickenology: Food Delivery Challenge

McCormick Place - W179b

Participants will use sensemaking and the engineering design process to solve a real world food production problem in a small scale format. This lesson introduces the Food Delivery Challenge, in which participants must design a gravity feeder to carry food (chicken feed) to twelve hungry chickens for over 24 hours. To accomplish the task students must design and build a model of an efficient gravity feeder using the materials available to them. The scenario presented to the class: One of the feeders in your uncle’s barn has broken down, and a new one will not arrive until next month. You must create a gravity feeder to satisfy 12 chickens for 24 hours consistently to ensure the health of your flock. Participants will research, design, build and test their design before presenting to the group for feedback, Participants will then use the feedback to redesign for an improved feeder.

Takeaways: 1. Use the engineering design process to collaborate, design and build a gravitational feeder system that will feed 10 pounds of feed over a 24 hour period. 2. Present your design plan, and final product to the class for feedback. 3. Provide feedback to the design team for design improvement.

Speakers

Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH), Heather Bryan (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Lesson
Chickenology Student Rubric
Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Slide Deck

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Becoming AJEDIIs: Teaching and leading STEM education during a pandemic using chemistry and other eqSTrEAM ideas

McCormick Place - W178a

Building on workshops facilitated by Gholdy Muhammad during the 2020-2021 academic year, STEM teachers will explore how historically responsive literacy can be extended to science teaching and learning. The AJEDII Model considers how accessibility, justice, equity, diversity and identity shape pedagogy. Participants will review the framework, develop units aligned to current student learning standards, and explore resources developed by facilitators for a range of instructional modes and situations. When COVID-19 hit our schools, STEM educators took on the task of processing and fighting misinformation, teaching and training students, parents, colleagues and other adults in their community about a wide range of technical terms and implementing novel pedagogical technologies and techniques like never before. The imagined worlds of science fiction were being realized but the ending still has not been determined and has certainly not been predictable. Unfortunately, the pandemic that became most clear in 2020 was exacerbated by social problems that could no longer be ignored. Participants will leave the session with materials for designing instruction for virtual (asynchronous or synchronous) and face-to-face learning based on facilitators’ experiences.

Takeaways: STEM educators will apply Muhammad's (2020) historically responsive framework to secondary STEM education in learning design

Speakers

Joy Barnes-Johnson (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Shefali Mehta (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Mridula Bajaj (Mount Laurel Schools: Mount Laurel, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Oil Spill Simulation Inquiry
This is a full description of the oil spill simulation that represents STEM as a key component of "cultivating genius". Integrating STEM meaningfully into lessons as a way to allow students to experience joy while building skills, criticality and intellect.
AJEDII Presentation
Overview of how Historically Responsive Literacy (Muhammad, 2020) is applied to chemistry.

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Instructional Materials that Support Equitable Science Instruction for All Students

McCormick Place - W185b-c

In this session, participants will be introduced to a framework for identifying the features of a classroom culture that support equitable sensemaking. There are four main features: 1. Who is engaged in (or excluded from) classroom activity? 2. Who is treated as a "knower" in the classroom? 3. What ways of knowing are privileged in the classroom? 4. What science is practiced in the classroom? This framework is based off Kerri Wingert's Classroom Culture Investigations document and utilized as a foundational pieces of the OpenSciEd materials. Participants will unpack this framework and identify in sample pieces of student work and classroom videos examples of each one of these categories in action. They will be provided with tools and resources for self-assessing their own classroom culture including an exit ticket they can give to students to help inform the instruction. Examples of student work and instructional materials will be from the OpenScIEd instructional materials for middle school science.

Takeaways: Classroom culture is critical to providing equitable sensemaking opportunities for all students.

Speakers

Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Geometric String Art: Something for Everyone!

McCormick Place - W180

During this session, I will provide participants with black card stock, needles, string, graph paper and tape. We will start by creating the artwork as this will fuel the discussion later. I will walk participants through the steps using a guided slideshow with pictures. They will be given multiple options and allowed to experiment with their selections. I will give them time to work at their tables to create their art and walk around to help. The discussion portion will happen after the art creation. I will ask the groups to share their art with their table. The valuable portion of the session is when we will brainstorm the modifications that can be done to help all students access this activity. I will ask groups to discuss and share out as I create a list. I will add any modifications not already mentioned. Next, I would like the groups to discuss how this can be used in their classes, including the modifications they would need to suit their students. As a take away, participants will have a note taking sheet, access to the slideshow (includes examples and instructions), list of supplies needed and where to purchase, their beautiful artwork, and valuable discussions.

Takeaways: In addition to the art work, participants will leave with ideas, templates and modifications for a variety of students.

Speakers

Terri Serey (Orange Grove Middle School: Hacienda Heights, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Geometric String Art.pdf

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Using scientific data and data collection to make sense of real world phenomena!

McCormick Place - W176a

Using data collection , participants will learn how to actively engage students in a conversation about data and the phenomena that it explains. Participants will learn how to create and/or modify old lessons, labs, and activities into opportunities for discussion , inquiry, and discovery using calculators, Nspire, and labquests.

Takeaways: Create a dynamic lesson for use in the science classroom using data collection.

Speakers

Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Chicago Packet.pdf
Copy of Opening (1).pptx

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Data, Tables, Graphs, Oh My! Strategies to Get All Students Doing & Speaking Science

McCormick Place - W176c

We are naturally curious, prone to ask why? How? What? Unfortunately, somewhere along the way students lose the trust in their voices to ask questions of and from data. But data are what we use to do science and it permeates all aspects of society today. What should we do? Stop teaching the vocabulary of science and data first, and instead leverage classroom-ready strategies to empower students to lead with their innate curiosity to practice critical 21st century data literacy skills and master the science content. Join us to explore connections between our science content, inquiry-based activities, and data skills. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy and student empowerment. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better help students do and communicate science. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall self-identity as a scientist. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

Takeaways: Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century, how students can do a lot more with data than we often think or presume from their science vocabulary alone, and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into 6-12 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

Speakers

Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Access to Resource Document
Complete the Google Form to gain access to the Resource Document and slide deck from the workshop.

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Using the Scientific Process to Conquer Smallpox

McCormick Place - W196a

We can examine natural phenomena and address wicked problems using the scientific process. The smallpox virus emerged approximately 10,000 years ago, and the virus's global spread devastated civilizations. Thanks to the scientific thinking of a Buddhist nun, a milkmaid, and Edward Jenner, smallpox was declared eradicated in 1979 by the World Health Organization. To support the understanding of the nature of science in the NGSS (Appendix H), session participants will engage in activities that demonstrate how science is used to answer questions about the natural world through a process that is consistent, observational, natural, predictable, tentative, and testable. Additionally, participants will examine various media sources to learn how to identify scientific misinformation and the tactics used to make misinformation appear credible. The National Center for Science Education supports science teachers through free professional development and curriculum to recognize and address science misconceptions using the three dimensions of the NGSS. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

Takeaways: This session introduces participants to a basic understanding of the scientific process, how our knowledge of the natural world evolves with new evidence, and that science cannot answer questions that do not pertain to natural processes. Attendees will take a deep dive into an NGSS storyline sequence developed to help students understand that science is an ongoing process that must be supported by multiple lines of evidence to be accepted by the scientific community.

Speakers

Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), DeeDee Wright (Colorado State University: Fort Collins, CO), Cari Herndon (District of Columbia Public Schools: Washington, DC), Ayesha Alirahi (Science Teacher: , 0), Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Inclusive Grading of 3-D Science

McCormick Place - W178b

How can grading better represent students’ 3-D learning? This workshop will take a specific focus on grading phenomenon-driven curricula that do not have typical worksheets.

Takeaways: Standards-based grading and careful selection of student work aligned to lesson-level PEs for feedback can help make 3-D learning more meaningful for students.

Speakers

Kerri Wingert (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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What Is a Phenomenon Anyway?

McCormick Place - W194b

Sponsoring Company: Phenomenon Science Education

In this session, we will explore what phenomena are by looking at examples and non-examples and using criteria to figure out the differences.

Takeaways: Participants will be given criteria and guidelines that they will use to evaluate science phenomena.

Speakers

Sharon Cates (Phenomenon Science Education: Amherst, MA), Joshua Smith (Phenomenon Science Education: Novato, CA)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Formative Assessment and Developing Critical Thinking Skills

McCormick Place - W187c

This session is intended to discuss the importance of formative assessment as a tool for guiding students and helping all students to make progress. A variety of formative assessment tools will be explored. Most importantly, the use of individual feedback on formative assessments will be demonstrated and we will discuss how this leads to improved metacognition and critical thinking skills for students. Attendees will see sample student work on formative assessments and accompanying sample teacher feedback. They will practice making comments of there own, in addition to discussing logistical concerns with the practice of individualized feedback.

Takeaways: This session is intended to discuss the importance of formative assessment as a tool for guiding students and helping all students to make progress.

Speakers

Jennifer Maguire (Virginia Tech: Blacksburg, VA)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Using GeoSpatial Data to Teach Climate Justice

McCormick Place - W176a

Let's discuss the expansion and availability of geospatial data (arcGIS, EJScreen, CalAdapt) to examine environmental justice issues in their own community and create climate resilience action plans for an authentic audience (city council, school district, state lawmakers).

Takeaways: Attendees will explore strategies for using geospatial data to examine, interpret, and act on place-based environmental justice issues in their communities.

Speakers

Nancy Metzger-Carter (Sonoma Academy: Santa Rosa, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation
Resources, curriculum, lesson plans, sample case studies of student advocacy
Link to Schools for Climate Action Campaign
Free resources for student advocacy for climate justice on local, state and federal level.

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Changing the Mindset: How Labels for Science Courses Can Affect the Academic Achievement of High School Students

McCormick Place - W184a

This session will focus on how educators can support students to change their mindset in relation to the “labels" used to classify their science courses.

Takeaways: Attendees will be able to: 1. understand the impact that labels used to classify science courses—such as regular, honors, or AP—can have in the academic performance of high school students; learn simple strategies that can be implemented in the classroom to help students changing their mindset in regards of the courses that they are taking; and 3. learn how these strategies can contribute to foster a more positive attitude and a more productive culture of learning in the classroom.

Speakers

Ileana Bermudez Luna (University of South Florida: Tampa, FL)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Integrating CS into Science Storylines

McCormick Place - W176c

Science teachers at Lindblom Math and Science Academy in Chicago Public Schools have worked with Northwestern University’s CT-STEM department to develop computational thinking in science units aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards. The goal is for students to understand and apply computational thinking practices in their science classrooms to help make sense of phenomena or problems, analyze data, use models and develop explanations. Units, built by teachers, are designed to cover core science concepts in physics, chemistry, and biology. This program allows teachers to work with CT-STEM members to develop new simulations or other CT activities that work best in the unit. This was developed based on teacher need, when simulations didn’t exist to address the big ideas. Integration of NetLogo models, SageModeler, NetTango, and other data analysis activities are used to help students make real world connections. These tools allow students to learn and apply basic computer science ideas and skills as well as the 3-D of NGSS. Developed unit topics include: stoichiometry, climate change, gas laws, and energy. These units are available for public use and can be easily modified on the CT-STEM platform for teachers to use.

Takeaways: Overview of how teachers integrated Computational Thinking into science units and how to access units for Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Earth Science

Speakers

Carole Namowicz (Lindblom Math and Science Academy: Chicago, IL), Lauren Levites (Lindblom Math and Science Academy: Chicago, IL)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Planning More Accessible Science Lessons with Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

McCormick Place - W184d

In this presentation we will start with an existing basic physical science lesson that uses disciplinary core ideas on electricity, the engineering practice of making a model by constructing a basic electrical circuit, and the cross-cutting concept of cause and effect (closing the circuit starts current flow and turns on the light). We will then modify it using Universal Design for Learning (UDL) so it is more accessible, especially for students with disabilities. UDL encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson and gives students several ways to acquire the lesson knowledge, Multiple means of expression allows the students several choices in how they can “show what they know” and multiple means of engagement offers learners offers appropriate challenges to get students interested and motivated. Planning or modifying lessons using UDL not only makes lessons more accessible, but it also makes lessons more engaging for all students in inclusive classrooms.

Takeaways: 1) Universal Design for Learning (UDL) encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson. Use of UDL makes lessons more engaging for all students. 2) Applying UDL (Universal Design for Learning) will make the lesson more accessible, especially for students with special needs. 3) You may start with a lesson you already have. It is not necessary to develop a lesson from scratch when using UDL.

Speakers

Mary Ellen O'Donnell (The Help Group: Los Angeles, CA), Gargi Adhikari (Holland Brook School: Whitehouse Station, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pdf
Final Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pptx
Speaking like a scientist.pdf - Inv. Part 1.pdf
Claims and evidence.jpg
Debate.jpg

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Model-Based Inquiry in Biology: Three-Dimensional Instructional Units for Grades 9–12

McCormick Place - W176c

We will introduce our recently published NSTA book containing a collection of units and resources to help teachers engage students in three-dimensional learning through model-based inquiry.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how model-based inquiry supports three-dimensional sensemaking across the arc of a unit of instruction in biology classrooms.

Speakers

Todd Campbell (University of Connecticut: Storrs Mansfield, CT)

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Building a Better ADI Understanding: Using Student-Created Avatars to Explain Past Scientist Experiences with ADI

McCormick Place - W176a

This presentation reviews students researching and presenting on past ADI events in science through the creation of scientist avatars.

Takeaways: 1. This session highlights the use of a classroom-tested assignment where students are asked to create a personal avatar where they are pretending to be the actual scientist; and 2. The assignment works well to show actual ADI events that explain how science changes over time.

Speakers

William Sumrall (The University of Mississippi: University, MS)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Engaging students in problem-based learning through environmental innovation challenges

McCormick Place - W195

The Innovate to Mitigate (I2M) project empowers teachers to employ a problem-based learning approach to incorporate climate change education in their classrooms. Teachers, regardless of whether they teach language arts, science, engineering, or math, work with students to identify potential causes of climate change and to develop a prototype as a potential solution. Collaborative student teams, utilizing the various strengths and interests that they bring from diverse backgrounds, design and develop their projects and finally create a competition pitch. I2M provides a structure for teaching climate change throughout the school year, supports students to discuss their developing mitigation ideas with peers across the nation, and provides an outside incentive for them to work towards an end goal. We propose a mini-simulation of the competition experience where teachers, acting as students, participate in the sensemaking promoted by the competition. Teachers read a short article about an aspect of climate change, brainstorm in small groups to propose a solution that mitigates the problem, and discuss mitigation ideas with other workshop attendees. Facilitators present ideas for collaboration among their students and across the hall with other teachers, identify key NGSS integration opportunities, provide examples of student projects, and help teachers think about integrating such a project into their own classrooms.

Takeaways: Teachers will learn how to identify entry points for climate change education that capitalize on student desires to make a difference about climate change, support collaboration, and incorporate three-dimensional sensemaking.

Speakers

Santiago Gasca (TERC: Cambridge, MA), Natalie Stapert (Master Reading Coordinator: Potomac, MD)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Phenomena to Questions: Practical Engagement Strategies for Student Sensemaking

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Explore how to use phenomena to generate student questions that allow for further investigation to support student sensemaking.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to effectively use phenomena to allow for authentic student questioning and how to use those questions to increase student engagement and sensemaking.

Speakers

Nicole Vick (Northwestern University: No City, No State)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Phenomena to Questions .pdf

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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inquiryHub Chemistry: A Phenomenon-Driven, Year-Long, 3D High School Course

McCormick Place - W196c

This session provides an overview of inquiryHub Chemistry’s year-long, open-source materials. In the session, designers and pilot teachers will share their experiences adapting their practice to meaningful, equity-oriented chemistry learning using units like “How could we search for life beyond Earth?” “How can a small amount of nuclear material destroy a city but also power it?” and “Why are shellfish dying?”. inquiryHub Chemistry comprises 5 units addressing NGSS high school physical science standards in line with A Framework for K-12 Science Education. inquiryHub Chemistry promotes deep conceptual understanding of chemistry using hands-on manipulatives that show how atoms bond. This session will offer 1) An overview of the year-long sequence of open-source chemistry materials, including units on reactions, periodic trends, and in-depth models of matter and energy 2) a chance to experience one of the most complicated models in the curriculum: the Fuels magnet manipulative models, and 3) opportunities to connect with a national network of educators who have taught inquiryHub Chemistry.

Takeaways: Open-source inquiryHub Chemistry materials can be used to promote deep understanding of models and NGSS chemistry ideas

Speakers

Kerri Wingert (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Friday, July 22
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Battling Ignorance: 4 Words That Can Change The World

McCormick Place - Skyline W375e

Changing the world sounds like a tall order. But in reality, educators play their role to help change the world every day. Join Stephen Pruitt, former science teacher and science/policy leader, for a humorous, yet important discussion about the critical role of teachers in changing the world. Dr. Pruitt will share his experiences, both personal and professional, to remind us of the power of teachers in his life and as we recover from COVID. Dr. Pruitt has long been a member of NSTA and has worked for the national importance of science education and the support of teachers. His comical storytelling and somewhat unique look at the world will engage and inspire you as we all continue the fight against ignorance.

About the Speaker
Stephen PruittStephen Pruitt is the sixth president of the Southern Regional Education Board in July 2018. Under his leadership, SREB has continued its work on college and career readiness, postsecondary attainment, workforce preparation, learning environment, and support of the SREB states’ policy and education leaders to improve the education systems for each student.

During his career, Dr. Pruitt has amassed education policy, assessment, and instructional background at the local, state, and national levels.

Before coming to SREB, Dr. Pruitt was Kentucky’s state commissioner of education. At the national level, he had worked closely with state agencies and educators around the country to improve policy and practice in science education. In Georgia, Dr. Pruitt began his career as a high school science teacher and subsequently served in several roles for the Georgia Department of Education. Dr. Pruitt can be reached via email, Stephen.Pruitt@sreb.org, or followed on Twitter, @DrSPruitt.

Speakers

Stephen Pruitt (Southern Regional Education Board: Atlanta, GA)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Promoting the 5th C-(Citizenship) of 21st Century Skills and CRE into an Inclusive STEAM Classroom

McCormick Place - W176c

The use of inclusive STEAM pedagogy is the forefront of using NRC Framework, Hill’s model, and 21st Century skill in unison for generating a sustainable STEAM curriculum. In this presentation, a demonstration of how to utilize these frameworks into creating project-based learning units that showcase diversity and the embodiment of students seeing diversity in the STEAM careers. The NRC framework will include SEPs for developing and using a model, planning and caring for an investigation, and using mathematical and computational thinking and CCCs of cause and effect, structure and function, and energy and matter. The use of the NRC framework with sensemaking (phenomena, science and engineering practices, student ideas, and science ideas) was the basis for developing a hurricane unit for 6th grade and macromolecule unit for 8th grade. Both of these units are grounded in these frameworks and the 5 C’s (communication, critical thinking, collaboration, creativity, citizenship) and the Hill’s model for cultural and historical education (CRE). All these frameworks are woven together on the Hill model lesson plan template to create hands-on PBL for the students. This presentation will give both STE(A)M and science teachers ideas on how to create a curriculum that incorporates more inclusivity and diversity while showcasing the work of my students.

Takeaways: How to create a lesson that incorporates the 5 C's, CRE, SEPs, CCCs, and sense making into a lesson.

Speakers

Jenniffer Stetler (Chamblee Middle School: Chamblee, GA)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Discussion-Based Learning: How to Use Talk as a Tool

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Academic discourse is a vital part of promoting student sensemaking. Learn how discourse can be used to promote equity and access in the science classroom.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to use discussion strategies in the classroom to move student thinking forward, use talk as a formative assessment, and build a classroom culture that promotes student discussion.

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Cheryl Knight (Orland Junior High School: Orland Park, IL)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Effective STEM Partnerships Enhance Student Learning

McCormick Place - W193a

In this workshop we will demonstrate for teachers how easy it is to form lasting, interactive partnerships with corporations, nonprofits, and local community organizations and discuss how these partnerships create a community of STEM learning that allows students to connect their learning with the real world. We will model a variety of direct connections between classroom science concepts and corporate processes and bring awareness to the power of establishing successful connections between organizational systems and careers. Field-based, first hand experiences in forming partnerships will be shared in an open discussion that helps educators identify the numerous benefits for both learners and partners that are brought by incorporating potential partners within the classroom. We will provide a systems-based approach for how to research potential partners, develop effective relationships, and reduce potential feelings of uncertainty on behalf of both the educator(s) and the non educator(s). Additionally, we will explore the power of perspectives as we highlight how non educators learn the value of their shared time, experience, and knowledge with students. We will look at tried and true, interactive presentations made by corporate, nonprofit, and community partners and discuss the importance of student feedback that is later provided to the partners.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to establish meaningful corporate and nonprofit partnership opportunities, the benefits of partnering, and the natural connections that exist between a variety of science concepts and corporate systems that promote student engagement and real world learning.

Speakers

Debby Nelson (Rotolo Middle School: Batavia, IL), Elizabeth Kaleta (John C. Dunham STEM Partnership School: Aurora, IL)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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How Argument-Driven Inquiry Can Make Learning Experiences More Meaningful, Rigorous, and Equitable

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

This session introduces a way to create learning experiences that are meaningful, rigorous, and equitable for students. Participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS.

Takeaways: The characteristics of learning experiences that are meaningful, relevant, and equitable for students and how to give students an opportunity to use their own ideas along with the DCIs, CCs, and SEPs in the service of sensemaking during these experiences.

Speakers

Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Speed Sharing: Creating a High School Classroom Culture That Supports Student Sensemaking

McCormick Place - W196c

Join the members of the NSTA High School Committee as they share how they incorporate sensemaking into their classrooms and learn how to implement these best practices within your own classroom. A roundtable discussion will follow.

Takeaways: 1. High school science sensemaking discussion; 2. Implementation strategies of sensemaking; and 3. Networking with other high school teachers.

Speakers

Ruth Hutson (Blue Valley High/Middle School: Randolph, KS)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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TEST Speed Sharing: Creating a Classroom Culture That Supports Equitable Participation

McCormick Place - W183a

Join the members of NSTA as they share how to create a classroom culture that supports equitable participation, and learn how to implement these best practices within your own classroom. A roundtable discussion will follow.

Takeaways: Sharing of ideas on creating a classroom culture that supports equitable participation

Speakers

Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/k3k8DzZ6ckE_E

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Speed Sharing: STEM and STEAM

McCormick Place - W184b-c

1) Don't Reinvent the "STEM Lesson" Wheel
Creating meaningful lessons takes time. Finding helpful resources shouldn't.

2) Filling the STEAM Pipeline through Scholarships / Internships
This session will provide participants with information that teachers can share with their students relating to scholarship and internship opportunities that are offered to them for pursing studies and STEAM careers.

3) STEAM Practices to Support Identity And Equity in Learning
STEAM, or integrating art with STEM, can broaden participation in science learning. We will cover a set of core STEAM practices, developed in our work with both youth and educators, that support diverse learners and contribute to the creation of equitable learning environments.

 

Speakers

Nancy McIntyre (Robotics Education & Competition Foundation: Greenville, TX), Perrin Teal-Sullivan (University of Alaska Fairbanks: Fairbanks, AK), Jessica Strauss (Mabry Elementary School: Tampa, FL), David Rosengrant (University of South Florida St. Petersburg: St. Petersburg, FL)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Building a Classroom Community for ALL Students

McCormick Place - W184b-c

Creating an equitable classroom requires the creation of a learning community that integrates supports for all students to succeed. Learn how to use common strategies with intentionality to build a classroom community that supports sensemaking. In this session participants will learn strategies that allow you to take your students to the next level as a community.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how different strategies can be used to support ALL learners to create a community that learns together.

Speakers

Megan Elmore (Glenn Westlake Middle School: Lombard, IL), Randie Johnson (Glenn Westlake Middle School: Lombard, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Creating A Learning Community
Slides and resources for establishing a classroom community.
Part 2: Strategies in the Classroom
One lesson with lots of imbedded ideas that help all students. We will look through these and identify these helpful guides as well as have time to share more ideas from your classroom.
Presentation Resources
At this link you will find the presentation as well as resources for all activities discussed in presentation.

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Learning Better Science Practices with Science Fair Projects

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 5

A former national science fair judge provides insights on how good titles can improve the odds of winning at science fairs. The poster will describe what the parts of a "good" title are and how teachers can help your students create one.

Takeaways: Teachers will learn the components of a good project title (from an research project on science fairs) and how to help their students develop a good title for their own project.

Speakers

G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Global Conversations: International Film Festival and Share-a-thon

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 21

In this self-directed session, you will be able to: Interact with educators in face-to-face poster presentations; Watch short video submissions from educators around the world; and Participate in hands-on/minds-on, takeaway learning experiences.

Takeaways: Science education occurs everywhere on this planet. We can get ideas and best practices from collegues around the world.

Speakers

Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Let Your Inner STEM Grow

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 25

You can't grow a flower without seeds, just like students can't grow their STEM identity without a growth mindset.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn why growth mindset is a vital aspect of the foundation of students' STEM identity.

Speakers

Nicole Hebert (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Abigail Lupinacci (Student: , 0)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Rise of the Mutant Weed: Using DNA Analysis Tools to Identify Mutations that create Superweeds.

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 9

This workshop demystifies bioinformatics using free online tools. The activity explains the mechanisms behind herbicide resistance and genetic changes that help weeds avoid chemical control.

Takeaways: Participants will see a real-world example of artificial selection in action, while also increasing the awareness of free bioinformatics tools available for everyone to compare and analyze DNA sequences.

Speakers

Jane Hunt (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH), Zack Bateson (National Agricultural Genotyping Center: Fargo, ND)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Beyond the Chocolates! Using grants to fund your classroom projects.

McCormick Place - W193a

The objective of this workshop is to guide educators through a mock grant-writing process. We will begin the session by discussing the grant process from proposal requests to awards. We will discuss misconceptions such as tax-exempt status requirements, time constraints, deliverables, project impact, collaboration, and more. Participants will have the opportunity to go through the process by searching for grants and completing a mock proposal. They will be provided with “step by step” guides to help them design a project, clarify their project objectives, create a budget, and determine the impact for their students, schools, and community. Participants will present their proposals and provide peer-to-peer feedback during the discussion part of the session.

Takeaways: How to write a grant proposal for a classroom project.

Speakers

Emilia Odife (Lake Mary Preparatory School: Lake Mary, FL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Beyond the Chocolates
Grant writing for educators.
Beyond the Chocolates- Grant Writing for Educators
Beyond the Chocolates- Grant Writing for Educators

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Leveraging the Last Dimension: Crosscutting Concepts Across Grade Levels

McCormick Place - W184a

In this workshop, participants will engage in an activity demonstrating the power of the CCCs as a tool for guiding student thinking and teacher collaboration.

Takeaways: The CCCs can be used as a tool to reach a desired learning objective while also vertically collaborating around the grade level–specific details they encompass.

Speakers

Sarah Stults (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL), Chandra James (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL), Saswati Koya (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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iHub Anchoring Phenomenon Routine Polar Ice Unit

McCormick Place - W196c

Attendees will experience the Anchoring Phenomenon Routine as students do in iHub’s Polar Ice unit. This routine engages students in asking questions about why people from around the Earth are being displaced from their homes as a starting point in a unit of study focused on how we can slow or stop polar ice from melting before the sea level rises too much. After experiencing the routine, attendees will analyze the routine through an equity lens.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how the iHub curriculum supports teachers in eliciting and making use of students’ own questions and their experiences in instruction, which supports student motivation and agency (Harris, Phillips, & Penuel, 2011).

Speakers

Rachel Patton (Denver Public Schools: No City, No State), Kathryn Fleegal (Denver Public Schools: Denver, CO), Beth Vinson (Denver Public Schools: Denver, CO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Experiencing the iHub Anchoring Phenomenon Routine in the Polar Ice HS Chemistry

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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NSTA/ISTA Session- Bridging the Gap: Connecting STEM/Science Learning in CTE

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Student understanding of how science and STEM ideas and concepts are applied within their chosen career pathway is a critical component of many Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs, but for a variety of reasons these connections are often overlooked. Some states even provide CTE courses and Career Pathway standards that seem to go against the three-dimensional and student-centered learning grain. Yet, to truly meet the vision of the K-12 Framework, students in CTE and Vocational Education pathways should also be provided opportunities to engage in three-dimensional sensemaking in the context of their CTE course. In this session, we explore explicit connections between three-dimensional science learning and Agricultural, Food and Natural Resources as just one example of how three-dimensional student learning and sensemaking can be incorporated into CTE. We then explore how similar strategies can be utilized in other pathways with the goal of bridging the gap between science learning and practical application for students in CTE.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn strategies for integrating scientific sensemaking into CTE courses to support their students' mastery of the scientific concepts they will apply in those fields.

Speakers

Bridina Lemmer (Illinois Science Teaching Association: Jacksonville, IL), Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Bridging the GAP

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Engage in teacher developed activities that will allow your students to experience

McCormick Place - W184d

In this session, the participants will explore some lessons developed by teachers in the National Space Biomedical Research Institute-Teacher Academy Project (NSBRI-TAP). These are interactive, physical and focus on spatial disorientation and the musculoskeletal system as affected by microgravity. The teachers will engage in the activities and collect sample data as they would with students and interpret the results. These are both educational and fun as we need to desperately restore enthusiasm for science studies. The presenter has anecdotal stories from many astronauts of their physiological reaction to microgravity conditions that he will share. Teachers will be provided lesson plans and worksheets for use with their students. Sample activities: Title: IN-FLIGHT EXERCISES Grade Level: 5-8 Content Area: Life Science and Health National Science Content Standards: Standard A. Science as Inquiry (Grades 5-8 & 9-12) • Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry • Understandings about scientific inquiry Standard C. Life Science (Grades 5-8) • Structure and function in living systems • Regulation and behavior Standard F. Science in Personal and Social Perspectives (Grades 5-8 & 9-12) • Personal health Title: SHIFTY EYES Grade Level: 5-8 Content Area: Space/Life Science National Science Content Standards: Unifying Concepts and Processes (Grades 5-8) Models Standard C. Life Science (Grades 5-8) Structure and function in living systems Regulation and behavior Diversity and adaptations of organisms Dr. Wilson also participated in two experiments on NASA’s KC-135 (Vomit Comet): 1) testing a resistance exercise machine to fly in space designed at The Cleveland Clinic and 2) an experiment where the corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea) was subjected to microgravity while a control group of worms was grown by elementary students in Las Cruces, NM. He will explain and share the results of these experiments and of one flown by teachers from Miami-Dade School District in Florida involved in his Future Scientists Program.

Takeaways: The International Space Station (ISS) is a research platform and is helping scientists develop countermeasures to the adverse effects of long-duration spaceflight on the human body.

Speakers

Craig Wilson (Texas A&M University: College Station, TX)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA2022teacherinfo.docx
background information and simple worksheets to collect data

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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How can we support and assess student growth in the practice of arguing from evidence?

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Arguing from evidence can be an integral part of the knowledge-building work students do as part of any three dimensional science learning, as students make sense of their findings and use them to develop and evaluate competing models and explanations. But how do we help students grow in sophistication in this practice over time? This presentation will provide an overview of the learning progression, tasks, and scaffolding used to help students refine and assess their arguments in the OpenSciEd middle school program, focus is on the support and growth embedded within a 7th grade chemistry unit. Participants will have opportunities to analyze curriculum supports, students’ written work, and video of discussions of students engaged in this practice using classroom artifacts from implementations of the OpenSciEd Bath Bomb unit.

Takeaways: Participants will learn what the practice of arguing from evidence can look like in middle school classrooms, tools that can support scaffolding practice, and how teachers can use it to assess where students are at in their sense-making.

Speakers

Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Brian Reiser (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA 2022 - Supporting students in arguing from evidence.pdf

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Bringing 3D Learning Home and Back to School Again

McCormick Place - W181a

Using CCCs can help organize and focus learning in a variety of settings. Out of necessity, we taught teachers to think deeply about connections to content and practices within the context of something they observed that was interesting to them while they were working from home. Examples learners chose that were relevant to them helped to connect personal experiences and interests with ordinary spaces and their science learning, and thus supported equitable engagement. Making these connections allowed teachers to recognize a multitude of science ideas and practices that could be connected to science standards at their instructional level, therefore developing new ideas. We refined this process and recognized that its flexibility can be taken back to the classroom and used settings that are seemingly science content deserts, to help students begin to see science in places they never thought of before. This session will take participants through this process and have them apply these ideas first to the setting of the conference and then to their own teaching situations.

Takeaways: Leveraging CCCs to connect students’ observations of ordinary, relevant contexts provides more equitable opportunities to deeply engage with DCIs and SEPs.

Speakers

Ana Houseal (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY), Clare Gunshenan (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

3D Prompts_PPT_NSTA Chicago2022.pdf
Bringing 3D Learning Home(2).pdf

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way of doing the right thing

McCormick Place - W175c

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way to engage the community in STEM. Participants will hear from educators that have won money for their school and communities to implement STEM action projects.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how they can receive cash awards and acknowledge for STEM action projects.

Speakers

John Anderson (Toshiba America Foundation: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Transforming Teaching Through Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Carnegie Corporation of New York released a challenge paper calling on the education field to transform teaching and learning through the elements and essentials of curriculum-based professional learning. Learn how schools and systems are helping teachers experience the instruction their students experience to help change instructional practices, leading to better student outcomes.

Takeaways: 1. Explore the rationale for a challenge paper dedicated solely to the issue of curriculum-based professional learning; 2. Discover the 10 elements and three essentials of professional learning critical to effective implementation of high-quality science instructional materials; and 3. Consider implications of the roles and responsibilities for putting into action the elements of curriculum-based professional learning.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Using Three-dimensional Assessment Prompts to Drive Student Sense-making

McCormick Place - W175c

The Vision set forth by A Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards emphasize science as the integration of practices (SEPs), content (DCIs), and big ideas (CCCs). By using all three dimensions, students are able to make sense of phenomena while learning science concepts and processes. However, this way of thinking and learning takes practice and guidance. Teachers play a pivotal role in helping their students to engage with this kind of science learning. Therefore, they must find ways to explicitly integrate and embed all three dimensions in activities, lessons, and assessments. This participatory presentation will explore how teachers can explicitly embed SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs into prompts (questions and guiding statements) to promote more integrated opportunities for student sense-making. By generating prompts that include SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs, teachers can guide students to think in a more three-dimensional way and gain the skills to do so outside of the classroom. Attendees will identify strategies for posing integrated prompts, consider the benefits of multi-dimensional prompts for students, practice asking and improving prompts, and apply these strategies to use in their own classroom context.

Takeaways: Creating prompts (questions and guiding statements) that explicitly promote the three dimensions can drive more integrated, equitable student learning

Speakers

Ana Houseal (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY), Clare Gunshenan (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Guide Writing Coherent 3-D Prompts
3D Prompts_PPT_NSTA Chicago2022.pdf

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Classroom Communities that Thrive through Camaraderie and Connection

McCormick Place - W185a

It takes time and intentionality to build a community of learners who trust each other, respect differing perspectives, share ideas freely, and seek feedback from their peers. This session explores a variety of strategies that can be easily implemented to build this culture and community from day one. Strategies that foster this type of connection, collaboration, and camaraderie will be discussed using examples and tips to implement in the classroom, starting with some fresh ideas for getting to know students and helping them get to know their classmates. Many of these ideas combine strategies we already know and add a collaborative and inclusive spin to them. Allowing for multiple types of student interaction is important to ensure all voices are heard and valued, not just the loud and proud. Including time for students to process independently, in small groups, and in the large group is important to developing an inclusive community. A variety of strategies will be shared to support these levels of interaction in the classroom, making student thinking visible in individual, small group, and whole group displays.

Takeaways: Teachers can elevate their practices to include all students and develop a classroom culture that invites student interaction, increases student engagement, and fosters equitable experiences on a daily basis.

Speakers

Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Classroom Communities that Thrive through Camaraderie and Connection Folder

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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3D Assessment that Leverages Interest & Identity

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Phenomenon-driven assessments can be aligned to standards and engaging to students. This session will answer the question, “How can a 3D assessment engage students’ interest and identity while promoting high-quality science learning?” We call this “5-dimensional” assessment. We will present several examples of phenomenon-driven assessments in grades 5-12 and deconstruct them. What makes them engaging? How does a 3D task unfold over several questions? Where are the big science ideas? Then, we will analyze the student work that 5-dimensional assessments can generate in order to see what 3D learning can result from aligned tasks. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of how to construct a 3D task, investigate student interests, and give meaningful feedback to students that goes beyond “right and wrong” multiple-choice questions. The final part of the presentation will offer examples of tools participants can use to adapt their own assessments by 1) finding meaningful phenomena, 2) connecting the DCIs, SEPs, and CCCs, and 3) writing prompts that integrate all dimensions.

Takeaways: How to design meaningful, interest & identity driven 3D assessments for secondary students

Speakers

Kerri Wingert (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Making the Invisible Visible through Engineering Design: A focus group

McCormick Place - W475b

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

Experience engineering design in action! Share your teacher insights as you evaluate competing design solutions for actual products. $50 Thank you gift certificate; first 20 participants.

Takeaways: Focus Group to provide feedback on competing design solutions for actual product.

Speakers

Tim Herman (MSOE Center for BioMolecular Modeling: Milwaukee, WI), Kim Parfitt (3D Molecular Designs: Milwaukee, WI), Heather Ryan (3D Molecular Designs: Milwaukee, WI), Kris Herman (3D Molecular Designs: Milwaukee, WI)

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Problem Centered Teaching by Tomorrow

McCormick Place - W193a

Problem centered instruction is a great way to engage students, integrate content, inspire learning, and naturally incorporate all three dimensions of the NRC Framework. However, true problem centered instruction requires a major shift in both teaching and learning, requiring the one thing teachers don't have: time--the last thing teachers need is another pedagogical strategy that disrupts their entire routine. Teachers will have the opportunity to voice their concerns and discuss some barriers of problem centered teaching and learning, while also addressing the benefits for both teachers and students. Considering the benefits, there are some immediate changes that teachers can use to help shift to a problem centered environment. Recalling that problem centered learning should be complex, meaningful, and open-ended, the four strategies are: 1) Make the Content Relatable, 2) Structure: Less is More, 3) Be a Resource, Not an Answer Key, and 4) Use a Problem to Introduce a Topic. Teachers will then have an opportunity to put the strategies to immediate use by picking a lesson or topic and work with others to transform it into a three-dimensional, problem centered lesson.

Takeaways: Teachers will explore four strategies that promote three-dimensional learning through the process of problem centered instruction that is complex, meaningful, and open-ended. They will discuss benefits and barriers to the problem centered approach from the perspective of both the instructor and the learner. Teachers will have an opportunity to brainstorm and work collaboratively on transforming a lesson or topic of their choice into a problem centered, reality based scenario that seamlessly integrates the Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas.

Speakers

Cassandra Armstrong (Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy: Aurora, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation Link

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Phenomenal STEM: Finding Authentic Problems to Solve in the K–8 Classroom

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Are identifying and choosing relevant, authentic problems to put in front of your students holding you back from providing opportunities to engage your students in engineering design? In this workshop, gain insight into what makes a problem instructionally productive. We’ll also explore resources available to support you in selecting problems to put in front of your students and strategies to help students identify problems they want to pursue individually or in small groups for STEM competitions or their own interests.

Takeaways: Explore authentic problems to solve in your STEM classrooms.

Speakers

Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Get to Know H2O with Hands on Models

McCormick Place - W475b

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

Participants will explore the structure of water molecules and how it allows life on Earth to exist. They will use the magnetic water molecules to explore the concepts of polarity and hydrogen bonding. Participants will be able to use this kit to teach adhesion, cohesion, and capillary action; surface tension; states of water; evaporation and condensation; and solubility. Finally, participants will examine how science practices can be utilized throughout the inquiry while also exploring key model literacy elements to prepare students for further learning using models.

Takeaways: The simple structure of water defines its complex properties that can easily be explored through modeling.

Speakers

Kim Parfitt (3D Molecular Designs: Milwaukee, WI)

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Instructional Materials Design for Today's Science Standards

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

One of the most important factors for ensuring that all students experience science education that prepares them for future success is access to high-quality, standards-aligned instructional materials, especially critical for our nation’s Black, Latinx, multilingual, and low-income students. EdReports and NextGenScience provide evaluations of instructional materials to help identify these kinds of high-quality materials. The organizations co-developed the Critical Features of Instructional Materials Design resource to illustrate and provide unified definitions of features that ensure instructional materials can help students meet or exceed today’s science standards. The features described in this document are based on approaches to science learning and assessment described in A Framework for K–12 Science Education and subsequent research. This session leverages key features and illustrations to engage educators and developers in a conversation about the features and what they look like in materials.

Takeaways: Attendees will develop an understanding of the importance of high quality materials for supporting students and teachers and discuss how to utilize the critical curriculum features for improving development and selection of curriculum materials.

Speakers

Jenny Sarna (Director, NextGenScience: , 0), Shannon Wachowski (EdReports.org: Fort Collins, CO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Critical Features Webinar Slide Deck_NSTA Chicago 2022.pptx.pdf

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Cultural Competence Matters: Improving Cultural Competence through Effective Interpersonal Communication

McCormick Place - W185b-c

Culturally relevant pedagogy embodies a professional, political, cultural, ethnical, and ideological disposition that supersedes mundane teaching acts; it is centered in fundamental beliefs about teaching, learning, students, their families, and their communities, and an unyielding commitment to see student success become less rhetoric and more of a reality. This session will aid in building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning. In this session, we will exhibit how to identify the key characteristics of culturally responsive lessons. Attendees will acquire lesson design methods that employ cultural competence and effective communication. Attendees will use collaborate boards during the presentation to respond and interact. Activities to exhibit how students identify with what they know in the classroom will be utilized to help educators make connections and apply this information when planning lessons.

Takeaways: Building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning.

Speakers

Kelly Haynes (Baker High School: Baker, LA), Jennifer Norwood (Instructional Support Specialist: , 0), Tara Hollins (Exceptional Student Services Educator: Zachary, LA)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Creating a Science Classroom Podcast

McCormick Place - W187c

Marshall Escamilla, one of the co-hosts of the freely-available Tumble Science Podcast for Kids, will share some of the basics of creating a podcast with your class. Classroom podcasts are a great way for students to share their learning with the broader community, and can be used both as assessment and communication tools--and it's a lot easier to do than you'd think. Beginning with a brief description of what features make Tumble free and accessible, Marshall will walk educators through all the thing they'll need to consider when creating a podcast. We'll start by asking questions like: -Who is the intended audience for this podcast? -What is the overall topic for it? -How many episodes do we want to create, and how often do we want to release them? Then we'll move on to some of the technical elements. What are the requirements for creating a podcast studio in your classroom? What equipment do you need to buy? What software do students need to have access to? how do you ensure that students can have access to what they need in order to be successful? Finally, we will discuss some of the basic skills teachers will need to ensure student success: knowledge of best audio recording practices, and how to use a few easily-accessible software tools to make students' work sound its best.

Takeaways: Attendees at this ession will learn the very basics of how to create a classroom podcast from a professional podcaster.

Speakers

Marshall Escamilla (Tumble Media Production: Greenfield, MA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Podcasting NSTA Session Resources

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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NASA Space Technology: Robotics and the International Space Station

McCormick Place - W185d

This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Learning Launchers: Robotics (https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/stem-on-station/learning_launchers_robotics) teacher toolkit part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help bring the International Space Station into the classroom. This session will focus on the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity that engages participants to build and test a robotic-like hand and understand how NASA uses robotic explorers to collect information about places where humans cannot travel. After watching videos "Robotics and the International Space Station" & "Benefits For Humanity: From Space to Surgery" participants will work in teams to construct a robotic-like hand and test their robotic hand by picking up an empty soda can or other lightweight objects. The “I Want to Hold Your Hand Activity” is aligned to national standards for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) (i.e., NGSS, ISTE). The focus of the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity ties Engineering Design and NGSS science and engineering practices of defining problems, developing models, and planning and carrying out investigations. This session connects participants to how NASA uses robots in many ways as well as benefit humanity with its robots’ doing science and experiments aboard the International Space Station.

Takeaways: 1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Attendees will gain hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM engagement activity in their classroom using everyday materials that encourages students to construct a robotic-like hand and demonstrate how data are collected when using robotic technology. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how humans and robots are working hand in hand to expand the horizons of space exploration and how robotic research that has helped make advances in medicine, auto manufacturing, among other things. Without robotics, major accomplishments like the building the International Space Station, repairing satellites in space, and exploring other worlds would not be possible.

Speakers

LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Argument-Driven Inquiry as a way to bring three-dimensional instruction to your classroom

McCormick Place - W183c

The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. Such learning places the focus squarely on the nature of instruction. It is rooted in ongoing, active experiences that will prompt teachers to expand their content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and expand their beliefs about what is possible inside the classroom. The presenter will guide the participants in a series of focused, small-group demonstration activities that are structured like a typical ADI investigation, allowing teachers to experience instruction as students do.

Takeaways: • How to use this instructional model, or way of teaching, to give students an opportunity to learn how to use the DCIs, CCs, and SEPs to make sense of natural phenomena.

Speakers

Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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How do science teachers stay effective? Practical implications and strategies based on research

McCormick Place - W176c

This presentation will use a mixture of hands-on activities and discussion questions to engage participants in the themes from research about how science teachers stay effective during challenging times For example, through our research, we have found science teachers often have a strong desire to help their students become better people and create an equitable classroom. They describe that they have goals for their students such as being critical thinkers, problem-solvers, creative, and collaborative. Our session will work to have the participants generate the types of attributes they want in their own students. We will then demonstrate two teaching scenarios: one based on best practices in science education and the other being a teacher-centered approach. We will have participants then analyze the teaching scenarios using the goals they have to determine which has more culturally responsive teaching practices. We will also engage students in a hands-on activity using a gravity well that connects to MS-PS2-4. We will use the activity to discuss culturally responsive teaching practices in science teaching including scaffolding, effective questioning, a method to analyze teaching, and using experiences and phenomena to help students deeply engage in all three dimensions of the NGSS.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about inclusive teaching strategies that help science teachers stay effective.

Speakers

Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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The Science of Student Engagement- How stress and the brain affect learning

McCormick Place - W181c

Students find science difficult or non-stimulating particularly when teachers do not consider cognitive, physiological, and socio-emotional disparities in students. Research has shown that engaging the appropriate parts of the brain helps students make a long-lasting, personalized connection to scientific concepts and practices. Studies show that discipline and learning problems in our classrooms may be associated with a lack of student engagement. Engaged students are less likely to be disruptive and are more likely to retain information longer. The focus of this presentation is to equip teachers with the pedagogical skills and strategies needed to drive student engagement and achievement by recognizing and addressing physiological, cognitive, and socio-emotional disparities in students based on an understanding of how a learner’s brain works. Participating teachers will explore the impact of emotions, storytelling, culturally relevant and hands-on learning on the forebrain and consequently on student engagement and comprehension. Teachers will learn to correctly harness the learning power of the forebrain, particularly, those of the hippocampus and amygdala, by appropriately employing suitable learning strategies. These will enhance student engagement, improve learning outcomes and increase academic achievement in the sciences.

Takeaways: Teachers will learn to correctly harness the learning power of the forebrain, particularly, those of the hippocampus and amygdala, by appropriately employing suitable learning strategies

Speakers

Chidi Duru (Prince George's County Public Schools: Upper Marlboro, MD)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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"Are These Materials Designed for NGSS?" EdReports Expansion to High School Reviews

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Since 2015, EdReports has published more than 900 free reviews of K-12 instructional materials including nearly 70 reviews of K-8 science programs. Most recently, EdReports completed a listening and learning tour to hear directly from the field about what’s needed to conduct rigorous reviews of high school science materials. Findings point toward inequities not only in the selection and use of quality curricula, but also a lack of support for educators to make the instructional shifts necessary. This session will open with research on the challenges educators face in finding quality materials, detail how the mission and vision of EdReports aims to address those challenges, and share the findings that have guided high school review tool development. Participants will engage in large group, small group, and pair share conversations to reflect on their own classroom materials and adoption practices, and discuss strategies for navigating the challenges involved with high school science instructional materials. Educators will also learn about opportunities to engage as an EdReports reviewer in upcoming reviews, which includes NGSS training, an extended learning community, and a paid stipend for participation.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn about the expansion into high school science and develop an understanding of the tool development process, characteristics of alignment to the NGSS and usability, and how EdReports supports educators through smart adoption processes and opportunities to participate in educator-led review teams.

Speakers

Shannon Wachowski (EdReports.org: Fort Collins, CO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Chicago 2022 HS.pdf

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Mission Blast-Off: Interdisciplinary Rocket Science

McCormick Place - W476

Sponsoring Company: Estes Education

What does it take for a rocket to launch? Join us for this mission to see how rocket science transcends STEM and beyond.

Takeaways: Model rocketry is an interdisciplinary tool for any classroom to provide hands-on, inquiry-based learning for all.

Speakers

Kathy Biernat (Educational Consultant: Franklin, WI)

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Using Audio to Enhance Science Learning

McCormick Place - W187c

In this panel discussion, we will discuss the ways that audio content like podcasts can be used in the classroom to increase student engagement. This discussion between several leaders in the field of audio education will share some of the ways that teachers can and should use audio content to enhance science learning at all grade levels.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to include audio in their lesson plans in ways that are effective, engaging, and inclusive.

Speakers

Marshall Escamilla (Tumble Media Production: Greenfield, MA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Podcasting NSTA Session Resources

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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3D Models for 3D Instruction: How models enhance storylines

McCormick Place - W475b

Sponsoring Company: 3D Molecular Designs

Participants will explore how phenomenon-driven inquiry is enhanced using rich 3D models that let students figure out answers to their own questions while engaged in science practices. First, anchor-level and lesson level storylines familiar to participants will be identified. Then questions students generate will be explored while noting instructional routines that help maintain inquiry are discussed. Models that can help students investigate cellular processes like signaling, differentiation, growth, repair, and reproduction, at the microscopic and molecular levels will be used for participants to interrogate their own conceptual models and reflect on their learning. Strategies for capturing and monitoring student learning will be shared along with suggestions for summative assessments that are three dimensional.

Takeaways: Participants will explore how phenomenon-driven inquiry is enhanced using rich 3D models that let students figure out answers to their own questions while engaged in science practices.

Speakers

Kim Parfitt (3D Molecular Designs: Milwaukee, WI)

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Understanding the Importance of Climate Modeling

McCormick Place - W195

A scientific model represents the cause and effect relationships between components of a system attempting to replicate the system in such a way as to be predictive. Models are necessary when the studied system is too complex to isolate each component and test variables and their impact on the whole system. Climate is a highly complex system, but modeling allows climate scientists to identify the variables within the system and study each of them independently and as a system. The evolution of video game graphics and consoles mirrors the evolution of models used to replicate Earth’s climate. To support the understanding of NGSS HS-ESS2: Earth’s Systems and HS-ESS3: Earth and Human Activity, session participants will analyze data from different factors affecting climate and average global temperatures. Ultimately, data shows the rapid increase of greenhouse gases due to human activity. Additionally, participants will examine various climate models focusing on the factors included in building the model and communicate their findings by creating their model. The National Center for Science Education supports science teachers through free professional development and curriculum to recognize and address science misconceptions using the three dimensions of the NGSS. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

Takeaways: Scientists use models to understand highly complex systems and make predictions about future outcomes. Climate scientists use multiple data sources to design and test comprehensive climate models to examine past climates and predict future trends. Attendees will learn about the history and evolution of climate modeling while examining evidence that supports their reliability for predicting future climate patterns.

Speakers

Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), DeeDee Wright (Colorado State University: Fort Collins, CO), Cari Herndon (District of Columbia Public Schools: Washington, DC), Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Science Is Social! Student Ideas at the Center of Phenomenon-Driven, Three-Dimensional Teaching and Learning (Secondary)

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Explore how NSTA’s phenomena-driven lessons/units motivate students to engage in science practices to make sense of science ideas they need to explain how or why the phenomenon occurs.

Takeaways: Understand the critical attributes of sensemaking. Strategies for intentional sequences of student interactions to provide access to participation and learning for all students. Students’ strategic use of modalities (talk, text, gestures, drawings, etc.)

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Speed Sharing: Data Driven Science

McCormick Place - W183c

1) Try EarthKAM: A Real Mission for Students Using a Camera on the International Space Station (ISS); Get a Unique Perceptive of Earth and its  Features
Participants will get the nuts and bolts as to how to implement EarthKAM, a program on the ISS for students to request images of Earth.

2) A Crucial First Step: Modifying the CER Framework to Incorporate Initial Data Descriptions
Learn how including a ‘data description’ step before making a scientific claim helps students to write higher-quality scientific explanations when interpreting messy real-world datasets.

3) Applying Time Management Techniques to Assist Students in Classroom Labs/Activities
Are your students disorganized and their labs/activities are not getting completed? This session presents time management techniques to support students efficiently using time during labs/activities and assignments.

Speakers

Sally Jensen (Retired Educator: Campton, NH), Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Andrea Drewes (Rider University: Lawrenceville, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

EarthKAM Comparative Planetology and Art.pdf
Ideas When Working with EarthKAM in the Classroom.docx
Basic Training for EarthKAM.docx

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Speed Sharing: Secondary Classrooms

McCormick Place - W184a

1) Poly-density Bottles DIY for Inquiry
I will share how to create your own cool polydensity bottles and use them for student inquiry activities that relate to many topics including density, molecular properties, and solubility.

2) Investigate Stars and Galaxies Using NASA’s Universe of Learning STEM JS9 Image Analysis Tools and Data
Access NASA’s Universe of Learning image analysis tools to investigate  the chemistry, physics, mechanics and variability of stars, binary systems, supernovas, stellar cores, and galaxies.

3) Explore El Niño and La Nina the relationship between Ocean and Atmosphere that affects the warming of the ocean waters
Materials will help teachers present the topic of El Nino and La Nino in the classroom. They will gain insight into the atmospheric and oceanic processes behind the El Nino and La Nino Phenomena with hands-on exploration

 

Speakers

Diane Ripollone (Cardinal Gibbons High School: Raleigh, NC), Donna Young (NASA/NSO/UoL Program Manager: Laughlin, NV)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Virtual STEAM Fair
Using Google Sites to create a Vrtual Steam Fair.
Stellar Evolution & JS9.pdf
JS9 Image Analysis Tools, Tutorial, Guides and Investigations
NASA UoL JS9 Image Analysis Tools

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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