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2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Wednesday, July 20
8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
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SC-1: Developing and Using Three-Dimensional Assessment Tasks to Support NGSS Instruction

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Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Hyde Park A/B

Ticket Price:

  • $75 earlybird
  • $100 advance

If you have not yet registered for the conference, you may purchase tickets when you register online.

Please note that if you are already registered for the conference and wish to purchase this ticket, click the "add to cart" button above.

Assessment tasks for NGSS classrooms are different from the typical tasks that require students to recall what they know. A Framework for K–12 Science Education and the NGSS call for assessment tasks that ask students to use and apply the three dimensions of science proficiency: disciplinary core ideas, scientific and engineering practices, and crosscutting concepts. With three-dimensional tasks, the expectation is that students will use and apply the three dimensions of science proficiency together to make sense of phenomena or solve problems.

In this session, we focus on designing three-dimensional assessment tasks for classroom use with an emphasis on assessment for teaching and learning. A good assessment task should provide actionable information of value to teachers and their students. Importantly, it should provide insight into how students are building toward an NGSS performance expectation.

How can we use performance expectations to construct assessment tasks that can be used during instruction? Participants will learn an approach for designing three-dimensional assessment tasks and explore how to use them formatively in classrooms to help students build toward the performance expectations.

Participants will also be able to preorder our assessment book Creating and Using Instructionally Supportive Assessments in NGSS Classrooms.

Takeaways: Participants will learn: 1. what is meant by three-dimensional assessment; 2. how to design classroom-based assessment tasks aligned with the NGSS; and 3. how to make use of formative assessment tasks to support instruction.

Speakers

Joseph Krajcik (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI), Christopher Harris (K-12 Alliance/WestEd: Redwood City, CA)

Wednesday, July 20
11:45 AM - 12:45 PM
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Lunch: Elements of Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Regency Ballroom

By Invitation Only

Shifting from traditional professional development to curriculum-based professional learning is a simple concept but complex to design and execute well. At its core, it means teachers experience the same kind of inquiry-based learning we expect them to provide their students. Learn more about a Carnegie Corporation of New York report, The Elements, which identifies a core set of research-based actions, approaches, and enabling conditions that effective schools and systems have put in place to reinforce and amplify the power of high-quality curriculum and skillful teaching.

Takeaways: 1. Examine beliefs and assumptions regarding the relationship between high-quality instructional materials, curriculum-based professional learning and student success 2. Gain understanding of the foundation for The Elements, a challenge paper from Carnegie Corporation of New York 3. Learn from science practitioners whose successful curriculum implementation efforts are grounded in the elements and essentials.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Wednesday, July 20
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
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SC-2: Supporting Teachers and Students in the Science Classroom Using NSTA’s Instructional Coaching Tools and Protocols

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Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Hyde Park A/B

Ticket Price:

  • $75 earlybird
  • $100 advance

If you have not yet registered for the conference, you may purchase tickets when you register online.

Please note that if you are already registered for the conference and wish to purchase this ticket, click the "add to cart" button above.

This workshop is designed for instructional coaches and leaders who want to support their teachers in making the instructional shifts required by three-dimensional science standards. Participants will receive NSTA’s suite of instructional coaching tools and gain experience using the protocols and providing feedback.

Takeaways: 1. Become familiar with a suite of instructional coaching tools and protocols; 2. Gain experience using the instructional coaching tools and protocols; and 3. Identify ways to use the tools to provide feedback to teachers and document growth over time.

Speakers

Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/M85g4eNS_sCs_E

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a Brand New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

Since its release, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the NGSS has become an essential tool for many educators across the country. A new version titled the Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimension has been developed to not only support teachers in all states that have standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education. This new version of the Quick-Reference Guide still contains the most useful features of the original, including descriptions of the practices and the crosscutting concepts from the Framework of K-12 Science Education and K-12 progressions of the elements of all three dimensions. In addition, the new Quick-Reference Guide contains several new features that should make it even more helpful. For example, every element now has a unique code (based on the codes in the NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions) that makes it much easier to reference a particular element. In addition, there is an entire chapter devoted to the Performance Expectations. Finally, the guide also contains a number of tools for working with standards. This session will outline all of the features of the guide through the process of unpacking the crosscutting concepts to better understand how to make curriculum, instruction, and assessment more three-dimensional.

Takeaways: A deeper understanding of the Crosscutting Concepts and how a well-designed reference guide can make it easier to unpack the three dimensions for work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

Speakers

Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Universal Design for Learning (UDL) - An Effective Approach to Ensuring an Inclusive Science Classroom

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines are a tool that can be used to design learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners (CAST, 2018). Instructional designers and teachers can use these principles to create learning environments that reduce barriers to access for all students, while keeping in mind the learning goals of the lesson. The three guiding principles of UDL are engagement, representation, and action and expression. In this session educators will be provided with examples of these principles in action in sample materials from OpenSciEd and classroom videos. In these examples, participating will identify how the materials have been purposefully designed with multiple avenues for engagement, representation, and action and expression. Additionally, they will identify the built-in supports for teachers to highlight student assets and to address potential barriers to learning for their local student population. Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

Takeaways: Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

Speakers

Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Using tools to sense and interact with the environment

McCormick Place - W193a

After learning about computational thinking, participants will apply the framework to determine where students engage in computational thinking within the activity. Participants will engage in activities where students engineer as part of the investigations. Participants will be able to use a pre-programmed microcontroller (loaned by the presenters) to experience 3 different short investigations each tied to a different phenomenon. 1) Does angle matter? How does the angle of the collector affect how warm it is? Using the microcontroller and lamps participants will collect data to build a model that explains why the tilt of the Earth creates different seasons. 2) Transparent, Translucent, and Opaque. When working in a greenhouse, different materials can be used to cover the greenhouse. Which is the best material for your area? Using the light level sensor on the microcontroller, participants test different materials to recommend their uses when designing a greenhouse. 3) Making an alarm - using the microcontroller accelerometer sensor, participants arm an alarm and see how the accelerometer works in three dimensions. Participants will be provided printed copies of the lesson plans and how to engage students with using the microcontrollers. Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment brought is necessary to participate in this workshop.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn (1) Microcontrollers are small computers that come with several integrated sensors. Their functionality makes them useful for both investigations and engineering projects. Some of the basic functionality of different microcontrollers (2) One definition of computation thinking is how to use computers to solve problems. Computational thinking activities that connect students to everyday phenomena. The development of algorithms or the decomposition of problems into simple steps are just two examples of processes associated with computation thinking. It is a powerful problem-solving technique that is used in the modern world (3) How engineering tasks provide opportunities for student sensemaking

Speakers

Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Using tools to sense and interact with the environment.pdf

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Now I see it! Now I get it!

McCormick Place - W184d

Without out a doubt the recent pandemic has demonstrated that, the efforts in the science classroom towards scientific literacy are more relevant than ever. In this session participants will learn simple effective visual literacy tools and strategies that make learning science visible to all students, supporting diversity and reinforcing scientific literacy skills that help students make sense of the world. The strategies and tools used in this presentation will highlight the need to incorporate visual literacy as current brain research shows that around 60% of information we process every day comes in visual form. Sometimes chunking content to smaller learning bites can lower the understanding of concepts and ideas, especially if these concepts are abstract in nature; learning how to maximize the use of visuals both student and teacher made supports deeper understanding not just on a particular concept but of how they are connected making sense of the world. These strategies support cultural competency as they support learner diversity while working on scientific literacy skills such as use of evidence/data, pose questions, find answers. By having a common visual as point of reference along with strategy and tools not only closes the gap on background knowledge and makes accessible to all students but also helps student and teachers have meaningful discourse highlighting students strengths to solve real world problems.

Takeaways: In this session participants will learn simple effective visual literacy tools and strategies that make learning science visible to all students, supporting diversity and reinforcing scientific literacy skills that help students make sense of the world.

Speakers

Marjorie Miles Dozier (Polk County Public Schools: Bartow, FL)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Strategies to Elevate Students Scientific Literacy with Real-World Data

McCormick Place - W181b

Science literacy is essential to be informed and engaged citizens in the 21st century. Data are what we use to do science. Thus, reading and making sense of real-world data are fundamental skills to being scientifically literate and a fun way to engage learners with science. However, how do we incorporate data into K-8 science without feeling overburdened with yet another thing to teach? By integrating it into what we are already doing! Join us to explore the connections between data, science, and literacy. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. The goal is to increase our data toolkit of strategies and resources to increase science literacy and relevance for students. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better helps students do and communicate science. Working with and learning from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ literacy skills. Let’s set our students up for success now and in the future!

Takeaways: Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into K-8 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

Speakers

Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document of links and the slide deck from the workshop.

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Linking Literature and STEM in the PreK-8 Classroom

McCormick Place - W473

Sponsoring Company: SAE International

Attendees will explore different methods and student & teacher resources for enhancing real-world STEM skills with meaning-making literature. Using AWIM's award-winning STEM curriculum and complementary comic & children's books as examples, teachers will engage in discussions and hands-on activities they can facilitate in their classrooms. This workshop will also address how diverse representation in storytelling can foster more accessible & impactful STEM learning for all students. Participants will receive a free AWIM book.

Takeaways: Learn methods and resources for incorporating age-appropriate literature into hands-on STEM activities.

Speakers

Bonnie Thibodeau (SAE International: Warrendale, PA)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Using Online Investigations with Digitized Specimens to Enhance Data Literacy and Scientific Reasoning

McCormick Place - W181c

Online investigations with digitized specimens offer broad opportunities for teachers to engage their students in authentic scientific research. EPIC Bioscience investigations are free, online, NGSS-aligned research investigations that guide students to participate in science practices: asking a question, collecting data, analyzing and interpreting findings, and communicating to others. Investigations use specimens from natural history collections in entomology, vertebrate zoology, mycology, and botany to provide fully-supported, online investigations centered on real phenomena and aligned to NGSS MSLS2-1 through NGSS MSLS2-4. These investigations offer key opportunities to enhance scientific literacy through effective sensemaking with student-collected data on compelling specimens. This session focuses on two key goals to help teachers support sensemaking during phenomena-based student investigations: (1) Identifying and remediating common student errors and confusion during data collection and analysis. (2) Practicing effective instructional strategies focused on enhancing students’ scientific reasoning and data interpretation. This session will involve hands-on experiences with student activities, as well as interactive discussion of classroom examples and evidence.

Takeaways: Identify common student errors and sources of confusion during data collection, analysis, and interpretation and deploy strategies designed to enhance student sensemaking from data.

Speakers

Kirsten Butcher (The University of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT), Madlyn Larson (Natural History Museum of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

EPIC Bioscience - Specimen Measurement Guide
A visual guide to measuring specimens, with examples and non-examples.
EPIC Bioscience - Data Interpretation Guide
Visual student guide to interpreting data patterns, with examples and non-examples.

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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The Meaning Beyond the Words

McCormick Place - W178a

For years, research on the language of classrooms explored how the way we say things impacts students’ sense of belonging. This session uses the NSTA Teacher Tip Tuesday—The Meaning Beyond The Words: How Language, Race, and Culture Impact Science Teaching and Learning web seminar to consider how we signal to students that we value their ideas and how they communicate those ideas in the science classroom and what we can do as educators to help ensure our students know they belong in the classroom and can do science. Participants will learn about opportunities to continue the learning after the session ends through NSTA’s new Professional Learning Units.

Takeaways: 1. Become aware of how we signal (or don’t signal) to students their ideas and how they communicate their ideas are valued in the science classroom; and 2. Learn strategies to support students in building on their ideas and each other's ideas to move toward building deep conceptual understanding of big ideas in science (disciplinary core ideas).

Speakers

Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/ktURlAGyUA4_E

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Broaden Science Participation: Unpack “Analyze & Interpret” to Teach Data As an Equalizer

McCormick Place - W179b

We live in a data-driven world, and our students will be working in a data-driven workforce. Therefore, it is critical that our Pre-K-12 students learn foundational data literacy skills. However, currently these skills are too often only taught in upper-level classes. All students need these skills and all students, down to our little Pre-Kers, can work with and make sense of science data. Let’s make sure data is an equalizer, rather than another divider in our educational system and society! Join us as we explore what perception and learning science tell us about how our brains process data. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources to build science knowledge and self-efficacy through data. Finally, we will explore ways to adapt our existing curriculum activities and data visualizations to help our students more equitably access science. Through hands-on activities and group discussions, participants will leave more empowered to leverage data and data visualizations into their science content in purposeful ways for all learners. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall 21st century skills. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

Takeaways: Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century for all students and ways to adjust existing curriculum to leverage data as entry points into science inquiry, sensemaking, and knowledge for all learners to see themselves in STEM.

Speakers

Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document and a slide deck from the workshop.

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Exploring OpenSciEd from Carolina

McCormick Place - W471a

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Come experience a model lesson from OpenSciEd for Middle School and see how the new Carolina Certified Edition makes these high-quality instructional materials even better!

Takeaways: 1. Experience the pedagogy of OpenSciEd through a model lesson; 2. Learn ways to encourage equitable classroom discourse; and 3. Create a Driving Question Board to explore real-world phenomena.

Speakers

Cory Ort (Carolina Biological Supply Co.: Burlington, NC)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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We Are All Explorers

McCormick Place - W184d

How are you engaging all students in critical skills to ensure they are ready for the future of work? What does the classroom feel, sound, and look like when students are making sense of their world and solving real-world problems? Join the alumni from the 2021 Northrop Grumman Foundation Teachers Academy as they share the ways they have transformed their schools/classrooms to align with the reality of work as experienced alongside engineers, technologists, and scientists.

Takeaways: Strategies to integrate workforce skills aligned with the vision of the K–12 Framework.

Speakers

Rachel Kenning (Spring Creek Middle School: Providence, UT), Anthony Carter (Middle River Middle School: Middle River, MD), Yevgeny Pevzner (Kearns Junior High School: Salt Lake City, UT), Leilani O'Dell (Roscomare Road Elementary School: No City, No State)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NGFTA Alumni--Workplace Skills

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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What Is Sensemaking? Exploration and Consensus-Building Tasks for Individuals and Teams

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Join us to learn what sensemaking is and how to use research-based resources to engage students in making sense of the world around them. Leave with a collection of resources to move your professional learning forward no matter where you are on the sensemaking continuum.

Takeaways: Develop an understanding of what sensemaking is and how it can help build classrooms where students are able to make sense of the world around them. Leaders walk away with a consensus-building exercise for their team.

Speakers

Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Elizabeth Allan (University of Central Oklahoma: Edmond, OK)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

McCormick Place - W185d

Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

Takeaways: Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

Speakers

Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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3D@NSTA: Strengthening Science Teaching Practice with CCCs

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

In this session, the co-editors of the recent NSTA Press book, Crosscutting Concepts: Strengthening Science and Engineering Learning, will take a deep dive into how crosscutting concepts can be more explicitly leveraged to strengthen science instruction. Presenters will illustrate how two instructional units—one elementary and one secondary—have developed CCCs as lenses on phenomena in order to better connect with students’ everyday experiences and to enhance students’ ability to meaningfully integrate SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs to make sense of authentic phenomena and problems.

Takeaways: CCCs are: 1) lenses on phenomena and problems; 2) critical to sensemaking about phenomena and problems; and 3) most useful when meaningfully integrated with SEPs and DCIs.

Speakers

Jeff Nordine (The University of Iowa: Iowa City, IA), Okhee Lee (New York University: New York, NY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA 2022 CCCs in 3D Learning PPT 7-21-22.pptx

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Maximize the Benefits and Minimize the Challenges Associated with Embedding Engineering into the Science Curriculum using Argument-Driven Engineering

McCormick Place - W178b

This session is an introduction to a new approach to STEM instruction called Argument-Driven Engineering (ADE). ADE is an instructional approach that gives students an opportunity to learn to use core concepts and processes form science, engineering, and mathematics to figure out solutions to a meaningful and authentic problem that will help make the world a better place. This instructional approach also gives students an opportunity to develop disciplinary literacy skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) because they must obtain information, share and critique potential solutions through talk, and communicate what they figured out and how they know the solution is acceptable through writing. In this session, participants will examine the potential benefits and challenges associated with embedding engineering design into science classrooms and learn how the ADE instructional model can help maximize the benefits and reduce the challenges. Participants will also have a chance to experience an example of an ADE design challenge that invites them to design a shipping and storage container for insulin and see examples of how students who completed this design challenge used science, engineering, and mathematics content and processes to figure out how to keep the insulin cold for long periods of time. Participants will also learn about how this new approach was developed through three years of classroom-based research by a team of researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and how well ADE instructional materials are aligned with the TEKS for science, mathematics, CTE, and ELA.

Takeaways: • How to give students an opportunity to learn how to use concepts and processes from science, engineering, and mathematics to design a solution to an authentic problem that will help make the world a better place.

Speakers

Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Using the NSTA Sensemaking Tool to Support Creating, Revising, and Selecting High-Quality Science Lessons

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Gain experience using the NSTA Sensmaking Tool to become critical consumers of curricular materials and support creating/revising lessons for sensemaking.

Takeaways: 1. Learn how to use the NSTA Sensemaking Tool to review science lessons for the four critical aspects of sensemaking; and 2. Understand how to use the Sensemaking Tool to support creating and revising existing science lessons for sensemaking.

Speakers

Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/x2paxwvcfUQ_E

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Crash Science: When Physics Meets Biology

McCormick Place - W185b-c

Use innovative video-assisted STEM activities, demonstrations, award-winning videos, and behind-the-crash-tests tours to teach the science of car crashes. Visit classroom.iihs.org for more information.

Takeaways: Participants learn how to incorporate culminating STEM design challenges (Project Pedestrian Sensors and Egg-Carrying Paper Car Crash) into their curriculum to promote student awareness and understanding of how engineering and technology are used to build safer vehicles.

Speakers

Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Engineer Physical Science Excitement with a Carolina STEM Challenge®

McCormick Place - W471a

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Apply creative problem-solving skills and engineering practices to chemistry and physical science challenges with race cars and rockets. Experience how Carolina makes it easy to incorporate STEM into your classroom.

Takeaways: Teachers will take away hands-on experience in designing, making, and testing balloon race cars and reaction rockets.

Speakers

Patti Kopkau (Retired Educator: National City, MI)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Teaching Grey Water Reuse and Water Recycling

McCormick Place - W181a

Water: It’s constantly in use all around us, but did you know that you can recycle water just like paper or plastic? Droughts and water scarcity are becoming an increasingly common phenomenon, and it is estimated that nearly 6 billion people will suffer from clean water scarcity by 2050. Yet, every year, Americans throw 11 trillion gallons of reusable water, also known as grey water, down the drain. In this series of lessons, students will learn about where their water comes from, the human water cycle, the three types of water and the connection between droughts and climate change. These lessons will also tie into the broader themes of sustainability and climate science and incorporate hands-on STEM activities and career connections. The lessons are primarily for elementary students but can be adapted for older audiences. They will be free for all teachers to use in their classrooms and are developed by Shreya Ramachandran, founder of The Grey Water Project in concert with educators. Join us for the presentation to learn more about grey water, why teaching about grey water and water conservation is important and how you can bring this to your classroom!

Takeaways: Session participants will learn about grey water reuse and water recycling and how they can be effective drought solutions.

Speakers

Shreya Ramachandran (Stanford University: Stanford, CA)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Science Teachers ARE Math Teachers: Integrating Mathematical Thinking into Sensemaking

McCormick Place - W185a

Using real-world phenomena asks students to puzzle out answers to problems that occur in their day-to-day lives. It encourages students to enter into sensemaking using their own prior knowledge and tools. One of the best tools to make sense of a phenomenon is math. Learn from CCSS Math and NGSS specialists about using mathematical thinking to promote scientific literacy. This session includes a focus on student agency, sensemaking, and supporting connections between the STEM classroom and real-world phenomena. The presenters will map CCSS Mathematics and NGSS connections while providing strategies for increasing agency and sensemaking in the classroom. Questions we will consider include: How do we support all students in becoming mathematical thinkers? How do we promote agency by providing students with authentic, engaging opportunities to collect, analyze, and interpret real-world data? How can phenomena and questioning techniques support mathematical thinking?  Come explore new possibilities of what high-quality sensemaking with math can look like for all learners.

Takeaways: Teachers will take away strategies to integrate mathematical thinking into student sensemaking about scientific phenomena.

Speakers

Emily Mathews (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Alanna Mertens (DePaul University STEM Center: Chicago, IL)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Including Teachers in Developing Large-Scale Assessments for Science

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Learn about the novel approach taken by Illinois to include teacher voice in developing a statewide three-dimensional science assessment.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about the process of developing a state-wide assessment written by local educators.

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Harvey Henson (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL), Angela Box (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Chickenology: Food Delivery Challenge

McCormick Place - W179b

Participants will use sensemaking and the engineering design process to solve a real world food production problem in a small scale format. This lesson introduces the Food Delivery Challenge, in which participants must design a gravity feeder to carry food (chicken feed) to twelve hungry chickens for over 24 hours. To accomplish the task students must design and build a model of an efficient gravity feeder using the materials available to them. The scenario presented to the class: One of the feeders in your uncle’s barn has broken down, and a new one will not arrive until next month. You must create a gravity feeder to satisfy 12 chickens for 24 hours consistently to ensure the health of your flock. Participants will research, design, build and test their design before presenting to the group for feedback, Participants will then use the feedback to redesign for an improved feeder.

Takeaways: 1. Use the engineering design process to collaborate, design and build a gravitational feeder system that will feed 10 pounds of feed over a 24 hour period. 2. Present your design plan, and final product to the class for feedback. 3. Provide feedback to the design team for design improvement.

Speakers

Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH), Heather Bryan (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Lesson
Chickenology Student Rubric
Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Slide Deck

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Instructional Materials that Support Equitable Science Instruction for All Students

McCormick Place - W185b-c

In this session, participants will be introduced to a framework for identifying the features of a classroom culture that support equitable sensemaking. There are four main features: 1. Who is engaged in (or excluded from) classroom activity? 2. Who is treated as a "knower" in the classroom? 3. What ways of knowing are privileged in the classroom? 4. What science is practiced in the classroom? This framework is based off Kerri Wingert's Classroom Culture Investigations document and utilized as a foundational pieces of the OpenSciEd materials. Participants will unpack this framework and identify in sample pieces of student work and classroom videos examples of each one of these categories in action. They will be provided with tools and resources for self-assessing their own classroom culture including an exit ticket they can give to students to help inform the instruction. Examples of student work and instructional materials will be from the OpenScIEd instructional materials for middle school science.

Takeaways: Classroom culture is critical to providing equitable sensemaking opportunities for all students.

Speakers

Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Geometric String Art: Something for Everyone!

McCormick Place - W180

During this session, I will provide participants with black card stock, needles, string, graph paper and tape. We will start by creating the artwork as this will fuel the discussion later. I will walk participants through the steps using a guided slideshow with pictures. They will be given multiple options and allowed to experiment with their selections. I will give them time to work at their tables to create their art and walk around to help. The discussion portion will happen after the art creation. I will ask the groups to share their art with their table. The valuable portion of the session is when we will brainstorm the modifications that can be done to help all students access this activity. I will ask groups to discuss and share out as I create a list. I will add any modifications not already mentioned. Next, I would like the groups to discuss how this can be used in their classes, including the modifications they would need to suit their students. As a take away, participants will have a note taking sheet, access to the slideshow (includes examples and instructions), list of supplies needed and where to purchase, their beautiful artwork, and valuable discussions.

Takeaways: In addition to the art work, participants will leave with ideas, templates and modifications for a variety of students.

Speakers

Terri Serey (Orange Grove Middle School: Hacienda Heights, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Geometric String Art.pdf

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Effective Discourse Strategies for Creating Inclusive STEM Classrooms

McCormick Place - W181a

This session by members of NSTA’s Professional Learning Committee is designed to help teachers deepen their understanding of the effective and practical strategies to facilitate academic discourse that promotes inclusive science and STEM classrooms. Participants will engage in a variety of instructional strategies to ensure that all students have access to scientific discourse, and opportunities to collaborate with peers, through intentional planning. Participants will engage in a variety of formative assessment classroom techniques (FACTS) from Page Keeley’s Uncovering Student Ideas texts, including commit and toss, pro/con pairs, structured think-pair-share, and more. In addition, we will be discussing the shift away from traditional talk patterns- like I-R-E (Initiate, Response, Evaluation) and towards Productive Talk to promote an inclusive science and STEM classroom where discourse supports student sensemaking. Finally, we will provide resources and discussion around the “lead4ward Instructional Strategies Playlist”, which provides teachers with detailed descriptions of specific, instructional strategies. Links to additional discourse resources will also be provided. The instructional strategies used in this presentation will promote student engagement, differentiation, and scientific understanding to help form a more inclusive learning environment where all students can participate in scientific discourse.

Takeaways: Participants will experience a variety of impactful instructional strategies that promote scientific discourse to help create an inclusive STEM learning environment.

Speakers

Kimberley Astle (Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction: Olympia, WA), Rebecca Garelli (Arizona Dept. of Education: Phoenix, AZ), Angela McMurry (The Ohio Academy of Science: Dublin, OH)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Evaluating STEM Curricula with Equity and Inclusivity in Mind

McCormick Place - W178b

Explore EiE’s curriculum design principles for inclusivity and NSTA’s sensemaking pillars as tools to evaluate curricula for inclusivity and equity.

Takeaways: Participants will leave this session with a framework for evaluating curricula with equity and inclusivity in mind.

Speakers

Diana Christopherson (Museum of Science, Boston: Boston, MA)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Using scientific data and data collection to make sense of real world phenomena!

McCormick Place - W176a

Using data collection , participants will learn how to actively engage students in a conversation about data and the phenomena that it explains. Participants will learn how to create and/or modify old lessons, labs, and activities into opportunities for discussion , inquiry, and discovery using calculators, Nspire, and labquests.

Takeaways: Create a dynamic lesson for use in the science classroom using data collection.

Speakers

Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Chicago Packet.pdf
Copy of Opening (1).pptx

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Data, Tables, Graphs, Oh My! Strategies to Get All Students Doing & Speaking Science

McCormick Place - W176c

We are naturally curious, prone to ask why? How? What? Unfortunately, somewhere along the way students lose the trust in their voices to ask questions of and from data. But data are what we use to do science and it permeates all aspects of society today. What should we do? Stop teaching the vocabulary of science and data first, and instead leverage classroom-ready strategies to empower students to lead with their innate curiosity to practice critical 21st century data literacy skills and master the science content. Join us to explore connections between our science content, inquiry-based activities, and data skills. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy and student empowerment. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better help students do and communicate science. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall self-identity as a scientist. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

Takeaways: Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century, how students can do a lot more with data than we often think or presume from their science vocabulary alone, and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into 6-12 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

Speakers

Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Access to Resource Document
Complete the Google Form to gain access to the Resource Document and slide deck from the workshop.

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Inclusive Grading of 3-D Science

McCormick Place - W178b

How can grading better represent students’ 3-D learning? This workshop will take a specific focus on grading phenomenon-driven curricula that do not have typical worksheets.

Takeaways: Standards-based grading and careful selection of student work aligned to lesson-level PEs for feedback can help make 3-D learning more meaningful for students.

Speakers

Kerri Wingert (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Dude Perfect Physics…or Using Student Interests as a Conduit to Learning

McCormick Place - W185b-c

It’s important to keep your finger on the pulse of what students are interested in beyond the walls of the classroom. By keeping up with pop culture and current events you gain a window to the world that a child sees. The trick is to capture that interest and use it to communicate academic content through a lens that stays with them. In this session we’ll see some effective tools that keep the message fresh and effective.

Takeaways: Using pop culture interests can be more fun and engaging than putting a character on a worksheet.

Speakers

John Hawkins (Oak Hill School: Nashville, TN)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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What Is a Phenomenon Anyway?

McCormick Place - W194b

Sponsoring Company: Phenomenon Science Education

In this session, we will explore what phenomena are by looking at examples and non-examples and using criteria to figure out the differences.

Takeaways: Participants will be given criteria and guidelines that they will use to evaluate science phenomena.

Speakers

Sharon Cates (Phenomenon Science Education: Amherst, MA), Joshua Smith (Phenomenon Science Education: Novato, CA)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Scaffolding Students’ Progression Through CCCs and SEPs Using Resources from the OpenSciEd Toolkit

McCormick Place - W186c

See how tools developed within OpenSciEd units can support students’ progression of and engagement in SEPs and CCCs across a variety of unit contexts.

Takeaways: Participants will leave with practical tools such as graphic organizers, general rubrics, and self- and peer-assessments that can be used to support students in incrementally building SEPs and CCCs in a variety of units.

Speakers

Dawn Novak (Science Educator: Grayslake, IL), Gail Housman (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Jamie Deutch Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA 2022 Chicago - SEP and CCC Toolkit Slides.pdf
https://www.openscied.org/teacher-resources/

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse: A 5E Instructional Unit on the Human Body

McCormick Place - W185d

The provided instructional unit will elicit students’ prior knowledge, as well as foster their individual and collective understandings of the human body.

Takeaways: Attendees will be encouraged to utilize facet-based assessments and classroom argumentation throughout lessons framed with the 5E instructional model.

Speakers

Alicia Herrera (John C. Fremont Middle School: Las Vegas, NV)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Formative Assessment and Developing Critical Thinking Skills

McCormick Place - W187c

This session is intended to discuss the importance of formative assessment as a tool for guiding students and helping all students to make progress. A variety of formative assessment tools will be explored. Most importantly, the use of individual feedback on formative assessments will be demonstrated and we will discuss how this leads to improved metacognition and critical thinking skills for students. Attendees will see sample student work on formative assessments and accompanying sample teacher feedback. They will practice making comments of there own, in addition to discussing logistical concerns with the practice of individualized feedback.

Takeaways: This session is intended to discuss the importance of formative assessment as a tool for guiding students and helping all students to make progress.

Speakers

Jennifer Maguire (Virginia Tech: Blacksburg, VA)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Using GeoSpatial Data to Teach Climate Justice

McCormick Place - W176a

Let's discuss the expansion and availability of geospatial data (arcGIS, EJScreen, CalAdapt) to examine environmental justice issues in their own community and create climate resilience action plans for an authentic audience (city council, school district, state lawmakers).

Takeaways: Attendees will explore strategies for using geospatial data to examine, interpret, and act on place-based environmental justice issues in their communities.

Speakers

Nancy Metzger-Carter (Sonoma Academy: Santa Rosa, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation
Resources, curriculum, lesson plans, sample case studies of student advocacy
Link to Schools for Climate Action Campaign
Free resources for student advocacy for climate justice on local, state and federal level.

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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The Student Design Guild

McCormick Place - W187a

During the pandemic, STEM leaders took on the challenge of connecting PK-5 students with each other in inclusive community events that focused on expanding access to STEM learning. The Student Design Guild (SDG) is a program bringing students and families together in a Covid-safe environment. SDG had three goals in mind: continue to provide STEM outreach for elementary students, provide a sense of community at a time when schools looked different and new, and provide ways for students to make sense of the pandemic. The SDG united students through a common need and engaged them in STEM learning. Through the design thinking process (a human-centered problem-solving process) and STEM stations, the guild developed opportunities for students that included designing, creating, building, iterating and sharing, all to lay a foundation for developing essential skills necessary for secondary education / work-force readiness. Participants will -learn how to design their own district/school-based Student Design Guild -have access to a model for creating a streamlined district-wide program that expands access and participation in STEM learning view design thinking as a STEM practice -view design thinking as a STEM practice -receive a district-wide student design challenge and a variety of turn-key STEM Stations

Takeaways: Learn about one district's model for creating district-wide programming that expands access and participation in STEM learning and understand how that model can be adapted to fit the needs of the user. Understand how to use the design thinking process as a STEM practice and receive a rubric for using design thinking. Have access to a district-wide design challenge and a variety of turn-key STEM Stations for students.

Speakers

Kristen Brohm (Innovation Center of St. Vrain Valley Schools: Longmont, CO), Colin Rickman (Innovation Lab Coordinator: Longmont, CO)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Planning More Accessible Science Lessons with Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

McCormick Place - W184d

In this presentation we will start with an existing basic physical science lesson that uses disciplinary core ideas on electricity, the engineering practice of making a model by constructing a basic electrical circuit, and the cross-cutting concept of cause and effect (closing the circuit starts current flow and turns on the light). We will then modify it using Universal Design for Learning (UDL) so it is more accessible, especially for students with disabilities. UDL encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson and gives students several ways to acquire the lesson knowledge, Multiple means of expression allows the students several choices in how they can “show what they know” and multiple means of engagement offers learners offers appropriate challenges to get students interested and motivated. Planning or modifying lessons using UDL not only makes lessons more accessible, but it also makes lessons more engaging for all students in inclusive classrooms.

Takeaways: 1) Universal Design for Learning (UDL) encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson. Use of UDL makes lessons more engaging for all students. 2) Applying UDL (Universal Design for Learning) will make the lesson more accessible, especially for students with special needs. 3) You may start with a lesson you already have. It is not necessary to develop a lesson from scratch when using UDL.

Speakers

Mary Ellen O'Donnell (The Help Group: Los Angeles, CA), Gargi Adhikari (Holland Brook School: Whitehouse Station, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pdf
Final Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pptx
Speaking like a scientist.pdf - Inv. Part 1.pdf
Claims and evidence.jpg
Debate.jpg

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Building a Better ADI Understanding: Using Student-Created Avatars to Explain Past Scientist Experiences with ADI

McCormick Place - W176a

This presentation reviews students researching and presenting on past ADI events in science through the creation of scientist avatars.

Takeaways: 1. This session highlights the use of a classroom-tested assignment where students are asked to create a personal avatar where they are pretending to be the actual scientist; and 2. The assignment works well to show actual ADI events that explain how science changes over time.

Speakers

William Sumrall (The University of Mississippi: University, MS)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Integrating Makerspace for an Inclusive Classroom

McCormick Place - W179b

It is often thought that a makerspace activity is something that is nice to do with students but not a necessity. Yet when makerspace activities are integrated into daily instruction, it can open many avenues that promote an inclusive classroom. This workshop will focus on strategies and ways to use makerspace to promote student voice and choice for areas of concept development, empathy-driven problem solving, and assessment. Participants will explore the key elements of makerspace and examine ways to use makerspace challenges to support sense-making. The discussion will also focus on the idea that makerspace activities can nudge all students to consider multiple ways of solving problems, thus enhancing their “out of the box” thinking. As part of this session, participants will explore different strategies in using makerspace to introduce a phenomenon, model a phenomenon, and assess students understanding on different dimensions of learning: Crosscutting Concepts, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Science and Engineering Practices.

Takeaways: Makerspace challenges provide student choice and voice in how they make sense of a phenomenon, a solution to a problems, and core ideas.

Speakers

Michele Detwiler (Gary Adult High School: Tampa, FL)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Approaches to Assessment and Grading that Support Student Sensemaking

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

As educators shift their teaching practice to align with the Framework for K-12 Science and the NGSS, they face various challenges and barriers. One pressing challenge is how to align their new approach to teaching and learning with existing assessment and grading systems. In this session, we will present provide examples of 3D assessments and associated scoring guidance. Participants will review student work for these sample assessments and identify evidence of understanding. They will collaborate with others in the session and determine how they would give grades based on set criteria. The second part of the session will highlight different approaches to grading based on local grading expectations (e.g., standards-based grading, daily grade requirements, or 100 point-based systems). Participants will leave the session with approaches to assessment and grading that support student sensemaking and honor the diverse resources students bring to the classroom.

Takeaways: Participants will leave the session with approaches to assessment and grading that support student sensemaking and honor the diverse resources students bring to the classroom.

Speakers

Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Phenomena to Questions: Practical Engagement Strategies for Student Sensemaking

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Explore how to use phenomena to generate student questions that allow for further investigation to support student sensemaking.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to effectively use phenomena to allow for authentic student questioning and how to use those questions to increase student engagement and sensemaking.

Speakers

Nicole Vick (Northwestern University: No City, No State)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Phenomena to Questions .pdf

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Unraveling the Mysteries of Color: Adding (and Subtracting) It All Up!

McCormick Place - W193b

Investigate how colors mix, by adding light sources or by removing colors from white light, and discover how cell phones and newspapers use these methods.

Takeaways: Color mixing has different outcomes when light sources are added than when dyes or inks subtract colors from a white background. Additive color systems are used in TVs and computer screens, while subtractive colors are found in photos and paintings.

Speakers

Gary Benenson (The City College of New York: New York, NY), Stephanie Codrington (Benjamin Banneker Magnet School of Architecture and Engineering: Brooklyn, NY), Kathy Gutierrez (P.S. 536: Bronx, NY), Gary Benenson (The City College of New York: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Battling Ignorance: 4 Words That Can Change The World

McCormick Place - Skyline W375e

Changing the world sounds like a tall order. But in reality, educators play their role to help change the world every day. Join Stephen Pruitt, former science teacher and science/policy leader, for a humorous, yet important discussion about the critical role of teachers in changing the world. Dr. Pruitt will share his experiences, both personal and professional, to remind us of the power of teachers in his life and as we recover from COVID. Dr. Pruitt has long been a member of NSTA and has worked for the national importance of science education and the support of teachers. His comical storytelling and somewhat unique look at the world will engage and inspire you as we all continue the fight against ignorance.

About the Speaker
Stephen PruittStephen Pruitt is the sixth president of the Southern Regional Education Board in July 2018. Under his leadership, SREB has continued its work on college and career readiness, postsecondary attainment, workforce preparation, learning environment, and support of the SREB states’ policy and education leaders to improve the education systems for each student.

During his career, Dr. Pruitt has amassed education policy, assessment, and instructional background at the local, state, and national levels.

Before coming to SREB, Dr. Pruitt was Kentucky’s state commissioner of education. At the national level, he had worked closely with state agencies and educators around the country to improve policy and practice in science education. In Georgia, Dr. Pruitt began his career as a high school science teacher and subsequently served in several roles for the Georgia Department of Education. Dr. Pruitt can be reached via email, Stephen.Pruitt@sreb.org, or followed on Twitter, @DrSPruitt.

Speakers

Stephen Pruitt (Southern Regional Education Board: Atlanta, GA)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Promoting the 5th C-(Citizenship) of 21st Century Skills and CRE into an Inclusive STEAM Classroom

McCormick Place - W176c

The use of inclusive STEAM pedagogy is the forefront of using NRC Framework, Hill’s model, and 21st Century skill in unison for generating a sustainable STEAM curriculum. In this presentation, a demonstration of how to utilize these frameworks into creating project-based learning units that showcase diversity and the embodiment of students seeing diversity in the STEAM careers. The NRC framework will include SEPs for developing and using a model, planning and caring for an investigation, and using mathematical and computational thinking and CCCs of cause and effect, structure and function, and energy and matter. The use of the NRC framework with sensemaking (phenomena, science and engineering practices, student ideas, and science ideas) was the basis for developing a hurricane unit for 6th grade and macromolecule unit for 8th grade. Both of these units are grounded in these frameworks and the 5 C’s (communication, critical thinking, collaboration, creativity, citizenship) and the Hill’s model for cultural and historical education (CRE). All these frameworks are woven together on the Hill model lesson plan template to create hands-on PBL for the students. This presentation will give both STE(A)M and science teachers ideas on how to create a curriculum that incorporates more inclusivity and diversity while showcasing the work of my students.

Takeaways: How to create a lesson that incorporates the 5 C's, CRE, SEPs, CCCs, and sense making into a lesson.

Speakers

Jenniffer Stetler (Chamblee Middle School: Chamblee, GA)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Formative Fundamentals - Designing meaningful assessment opportunities in an inclusive science curriculum

McCormick Place - W181c

In this session, we will look at current research on the purpose and method of formative assessment. We will then pair the research with student work samples to examine different methods of providing meaningful and actionable feedback to encourage student growth. We will also reflect on our assessment practices through the lens of creating equitable classrooms to ensure that all of our students learn at their potential. This session’s formative assessment focus will also extend to designing science storylines with an emphasis on universal design for learning. We will highlight tools that all students can use in order to have access to content. We will examine opportunities for incorporating social-emotional learning in meaningful ways as we strive to encourage all students to think like scientists. We will culminate the session with a discussion on intentionally cultivating student agency. Join this interactive session to elevate how you are using formative assessment to drive student learning.

Takeaways: Attendees will leave with practical classroom strategies for elevating the importance of formative assessment and meaningful feedback to foster student inclusive science classrooms.

Speakers

Mike Jones (Illinois State University: Normal, IL)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Discussion-Based Learning: How to Use Talk as a Tool

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Academic discourse is a vital part of promoting student sensemaking. Learn how discourse can be used to promote equity and access in the science classroom.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to use discussion strategies in the classroom to move student thinking forward, use talk as a formative assessment, and build a classroom culture that promotes student discussion.

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Cheryl Knight (Orland Junior High School: Orland Park, IL)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Effective STEM Partnerships Enhance Student Learning

McCormick Place - W193a

In this workshop we will demonstrate for teachers how easy it is to form lasting, interactive partnerships with corporations, nonprofits, and local community organizations and discuss how these partnerships create a community of STEM learning that allows students to connect their learning with the real world. We will model a variety of direct connections between classroom science concepts and corporate processes and bring awareness to the power of establishing successful connections between organizational systems and careers. Field-based, first hand experiences in forming partnerships will be shared in an open discussion that helps educators identify the numerous benefits for both learners and partners that are brought by incorporating potential partners within the classroom. We will provide a systems-based approach for how to research potential partners, develop effective relationships, and reduce potential feelings of uncertainty on behalf of both the educator(s) and the non educator(s). Additionally, we will explore the power of perspectives as we highlight how non educators learn the value of their shared time, experience, and knowledge with students. We will look at tried and true, interactive presentations made by corporate, nonprofit, and community partners and discuss the importance of student feedback that is later provided to the partners.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to establish meaningful corporate and nonprofit partnership opportunities, the benefits of partnering, and the natural connections that exist between a variety of science concepts and corporate systems that promote student engagement and real world learning.

Speakers

Debby Nelson (Rotolo Middle School: Batavia, IL), Elizabeth Kaleta (John C. Dunham STEM Partnership School: Aurora, IL)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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How Argument-Driven Inquiry Can Make Learning Experiences More Meaningful, Rigorous, and Equitable

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

This session introduces a way to create learning experiences that are meaningful, rigorous, and equitable for students. Participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS.

Takeaways: The characteristics of learning experiences that are meaningful, relevant, and equitable for students and how to give students an opportunity to use their own ideas along with the DCIs, CCs, and SEPs in the service of sensemaking during these experiences.

Speakers

Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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From Phenomenon to Figuring It Out

McCormick Place - W473

Sponsoring Company: Cereal City Science

Experience how to teach and learn across disciplines. Participate in figuring out K-2 and 3-5 science lessons designed to cross multiple literacy disciplines and build knowledge across grade levels. While figuring out phenomenon, participants develop models, talk about it, read about it, and write about it. Modeling becomes the scaffold for reading, writing and language. Learn best practices that will help students read text, produce text, and present their reasoning.

Takeaways: Students as scientists work together to discuss, read, write, and model to figure out a phenomenon.

Speakers

Sandra Erwin (Cereal City Science: Battle Creek, MI)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Supporting Learning Across All Three Dimensions Coherently from Unit to Unit Across Middle School

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

It has been common practice to move around units in science curricula based on teacher licensure, teacher preference, or state standards. However, the shifts in three-dimensional science learning supporting equitable science education emphasize the need for coherence intentionally helping students build the three dimensions, step by step, over time. We will describe a scope and sequence developed for the OpensciEd middle school program where each unit builds on the prior knowledge and experiences of all students to build increasing sophistication in all three dimensions, as they progress from unit to unit and grade to grade. We describe the strategies used to bundle performance expectations in a unit and for constructing progressions that build the elements of disciplinary core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and science and engineering practices (SEPs) coherently across the program. We describe how these instructional materials support teachers and students in connecting with and extending what students have figured out in prior units to build increasing sophistication with ideas and practices across the program.

Takeaways: Participants will learn strategies for developing and adapting unit to unit connections that support students in building each of the three dimensions coherently over time.

Speakers

Brian Reiser (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Supporting Learning Across All Three Dimensions Coherently from Unit to Unit Ac

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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TEST Speed Sharing: Creating a Classroom Culture That Supports Equitable Participation

McCormick Place - W183a

Join the members of NSTA as they share how to create a classroom culture that supports equitable participation, and learn how to implement these best practices within your own classroom. A roundtable discussion will follow.

Takeaways: Sharing of ideas on creating a classroom culture that supports equitable participation

Speakers

Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/k3k8DzZ6ckE_E

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Speed Sharing: STEM and STEAM

McCormick Place - W184b-c

1) Don't Reinvent the "STEM Lesson" Wheel
Creating meaningful lessons takes time. Finding helpful resources shouldn't.

2) Filling the STEAM Pipeline through Scholarships / Internships
This session will provide participants with information that teachers can share with their students relating to scholarship and internship opportunities that are offered to them for pursing studies and STEAM careers.

3) STEAM Practices to Support Identity And Equity in Learning
STEAM, or integrating art with STEM, can broaden participation in science learning. We will cover a set of core STEAM practices, developed in our work with both youth and educators, that support diverse learners and contribute to the creation of equitable learning environments.

 

Speakers

Nancy McIntyre (Robotics Education & Competition Foundation: Greenville, TX), Perrin Teal-Sullivan (University of Alaska Fairbanks: Fairbanks, AK), Jessica Strauss (Mabry Elementary School: Tampa, FL), David Rosengrant (University of South Florida St. Petersburg: St. Petersburg, FL)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Building a Classroom Community for ALL Students

McCormick Place - W184b-c

Creating an equitable classroom requires the creation of a learning community that integrates supports for all students to succeed. Learn how to use common strategies with intentionality to build a classroom community that supports sensemaking. In this session participants will learn strategies that allow you to take your students to the next level as a community.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how different strategies can be used to support ALL learners to create a community that learns together.

Speakers

Megan Elmore (Glenn Westlake Middle School: Lombard, IL), Randie Johnson (Glenn Westlake Middle School: Lombard, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Creating A Learning Community
Slides and resources for establishing a classroom community.
Presentation Resources
At this link you will find the presentation as well as resources for all activities discussed in presentation.
Part 2: Strategies in the Classroom
One lesson with lots of imbedded ideas that help all students. We will look through these and identify these helpful guides as well as have time to share more ideas from your classroom.

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Learning Better Science Practices with Science Fair Projects

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 5

A former national science fair judge provides insights on how good titles can improve the odds of winning at science fairs. The poster will describe what the parts of a "good" title are and how teachers can help your students create one.

Takeaways: Teachers will learn the components of a good project title (from an research project on science fairs) and how to help their students develop a good title for their own project.

Speakers

G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Global Conversations: International Film Festival and Share-a-thon

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 21

In this self-directed session, you will be able to: Interact with educators in face-to-face poster presentations; Watch short video submissions from educators around the world; and Participate in hands-on/minds-on, takeaway learning experiences.

Takeaways: Science education occurs everywhere on this planet. We can get ideas and best practices from collegues around the world.

Speakers

Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Let Your Inner STEM Grow

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 25

You can't grow a flower without seeds, just like students can't grow their STEM identity without a growth mindset.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn why growth mindset is a vital aspect of the foundation of students' STEM identity.

Speakers

Nicole Hebert (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Abigail Lupinacci (Student: , 0)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Beyond the Chocolates! Using grants to fund your classroom projects.

McCormick Place - W193a

The objective of this workshop is to guide educators through a mock grant-writing process. We will begin the session by discussing the grant process from proposal requests to awards. We will discuss misconceptions such as tax-exempt status requirements, time constraints, deliverables, project impact, collaboration, and more. Participants will have the opportunity to go through the process by searching for grants and completing a mock proposal. They will be provided with “step by step” guides to help them design a project, clarify their project objectives, create a budget, and determine the impact for their students, schools, and community. Participants will present their proposals and provide peer-to-peer feedback during the discussion part of the session.

Takeaways: How to write a grant proposal for a classroom project.

Speakers

Emilia Odife (Lake Mary Preparatory School: Lake Mary, FL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Beyond the Chocolates
Grant writing for educators.
Beyond the Chocolates- Grant Writing for Educators
Beyond the Chocolates- Grant Writing for Educators

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Sparking Interest in Computer Science with Unplugged Activities

McCormick Place - W473

Sponsoring Company: SAE International

With more states requiring computer science (CS) education for K-12 students, integrating computer science with other subject areas in a problem-based format is a practical way to expand students’ opportunities. Participants will learn about teaching “unplugged” lessons that support comprehension and application of concepts, to collaborative explorations that promote teamwork, creative problem-solving, and critical thinking. This interactive workshop will introduce AWIM’s CS curriculum series (including computational thinking, cybersecurity, and digital citizenship concepts) to demonstrate interactive methods for introducing students to basic computer programming and logic...even without computer access.

Takeaways: Discover activities, methods, and resources for facilitating effective & engaging computer science lessons independent of technology access.

Speakers

Bonnie Thibodeau (SAE International: Warrendale, PA)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Teaching with Phenomena

McCormick Place - W192a

Sponsoring Company: Mosa Mack Science

Not all phenomena are created equally. How you kick off your unit sets the tone for the entire unit itself. In this workshop, you’ll learn what sets apart the best phenomena and complete phenomena-based lessons.

Takeaways: How to choose, implement and maximize learning around the best science phenomena. You’ll also receive free access to phenomena lessons.

Speakers

Lissa Johnson (Mosa Mack Science: Fairfield, CT), Lorraine Gueye (Mosa Mack Science: Fairfield, CT)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Leveraging the Last Dimension: Crosscutting Concepts Across Grade Levels

McCormick Place - W184a

In this workshop, participants will engage in an activity demonstrating the power of the CCCs as a tool for guiding student thinking and teacher collaboration.

Takeaways: The CCCs can be used as a tool to reach a desired learning objective while also vertically collaborating around the grade level–specific details they encompass.

Speakers

Sarah Stults (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL), Chandra James (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL), Saswati Koya (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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NSTA/ISTA Session- Bridging the Gap: Connecting STEM/Science Learning in CTE

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Student understanding of how science and STEM ideas and concepts are applied within their chosen career pathway is a critical component of many Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs, but for a variety of reasons these connections are often overlooked. Some states even provide CTE courses and Career Pathway standards that seem to go against the three-dimensional and student-centered learning grain. Yet, to truly meet the vision of the K-12 Framework, students in CTE and Vocational Education pathways should also be provided opportunities to engage in three-dimensional sensemaking in the context of their CTE course. In this session, we explore explicit connections between three-dimensional science learning and Agricultural, Food and Natural Resources as just one example of how three-dimensional student learning and sensemaking can be incorporated into CTE. We then explore how similar strategies can be utilized in other pathways with the goal of bridging the gap between science learning and practical application for students in CTE.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn strategies for integrating scientific sensemaking into CTE courses to support their students' mastery of the scientific concepts they will apply in those fields.

Speakers

Bridina Lemmer (Illinois Science Teaching Association: Jacksonville, IL), Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Bridging the GAP

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Engage in teacher developed activities that will allow your students to experience

McCormick Place - W184d

In this session, the participants will explore some lessons developed by teachers in the National Space Biomedical Research Institute-Teacher Academy Project (NSBRI-TAP). These are interactive, physical and focus on spatial disorientation and the musculoskeletal system as affected by microgravity. The teachers will engage in the activities and collect sample data as they would with students and interpret the results. These are both educational and fun as we need to desperately restore enthusiasm for science studies. The presenter has anecdotal stories from many astronauts of their physiological reaction to microgravity conditions that he will share. Teachers will be provided lesson plans and worksheets for use with their students. Sample activities: Title: IN-FLIGHT EXERCISES Grade Level: 5-8 Content Area: Life Science and Health National Science Content Standards: Standard A. Science as Inquiry (Grades 5-8 & 9-12) • Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry • Understandings about scientific inquiry Standard C. Life Science (Grades 5-8) • Structure and function in living systems • Regulation and behavior Standard F. Science in Personal and Social Perspectives (Grades 5-8 & 9-12) • Personal health Title: SHIFTY EYES Grade Level: 5-8 Content Area: Space/Life Science National Science Content Standards: Unifying Concepts and Processes (Grades 5-8) Models Standard C. Life Science (Grades 5-8) Structure and function in living systems Regulation and behavior Diversity and adaptations of organisms Dr. Wilson also participated in two experiments on NASA’s KC-135 (Vomit Comet): 1) testing a resistance exercise machine to fly in space designed at The Cleveland Clinic and 2) an experiment where the corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea) was subjected to microgravity while a control group of worms was grown by elementary students in Las Cruces, NM. He will explain and share the results of these experiments and of one flown by teachers from Miami-Dade School District in Florida involved in his Future Scientists Program.

Takeaways: The International Space Station (ISS) is a research platform and is helping scientists develop countermeasures to the adverse effects of long-duration spaceflight on the human body.

Speakers

Craig Wilson (Texas A&M University: College Station, TX)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA2022teacherinfo.docx
background information and simple worksheets to collect data

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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How can we support and assess student growth in the practice of arguing from evidence?

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Arguing from evidence can be an integral part of the knowledge-building work students do as part of any three dimensional science learning, as students make sense of their findings and use them to develop and evaluate competing models and explanations. But how do we help students grow in sophistication in this practice over time? This presentation will provide an overview of the learning progression, tasks, and scaffolding used to help students refine and assess their arguments in the OpenSciEd middle school program, focus is on the support and growth embedded within a 7th grade chemistry unit. Participants will have opportunities to analyze curriculum supports, students’ written work, and video of discussions of students engaged in this practice using classroom artifacts from implementations of the OpenSciEd Bath Bomb unit.

Takeaways: Participants will learn what the practice of arguing from evidence can look like in middle school classrooms, tools that can support scaffolding practice, and how teachers can use it to assess where students are at in their sense-making.

Speakers

Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Brian Reiser (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA 2022 - Supporting students in arguing from evidence.pdf

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Bringing 3D Learning Home and Back to School Again

McCormick Place - W181a

Using CCCs can help organize and focus learning in a variety of settings. Out of necessity, we taught teachers to think deeply about connections to content and practices within the context of something they observed that was interesting to them while they were working from home. Examples learners chose that were relevant to them helped to connect personal experiences and interests with ordinary spaces and their science learning, and thus supported equitable engagement. Making these connections allowed teachers to recognize a multitude of science ideas and practices that could be connected to science standards at their instructional level, therefore developing new ideas. We refined this process and recognized that its flexibility can be taken back to the classroom and used settings that are seemingly science content deserts, to help students begin to see science in places they never thought of before. This session will take participants through this process and have them apply these ideas first to the setting of the conference and then to their own teaching situations.

Takeaways: Leveraging CCCs to connect students’ observations of ordinary, relevant contexts provides more equitable opportunities to deeply engage with DCIs and SEPs.

Speakers

Ana Houseal (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY), Clare Gunshenan (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

3D Prompts_PPT_NSTA Chicago2022.pdf
Bringing 3D Learning Home(2).pdf

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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"Are These Materials Designed for NGSS?" Understanding the EdReports Review Process (Grades K-8)

McCormick Place - W183a

EdReports science review is a by educator, for educator process that involves K-8 educators in the review of full year K-8 instructional materials that claim alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). This session will open by sharing research on the challenges educators face in finding quality materials and detail how EdReports aims to address those challenges. Participants will receive an overview of the science review tools, their creation, and components for both grades K-5 and 6-8 and examine characteristics of alignment to the NGSS and usability. They will engage in large group, small group, and pair share conversations to reflect on local priorities and to inform their own local adoption efforts. Educators will also learn about opportunities to engage as an EdReports reviewer in upcoming reviews, which includes NGSS training, an extended learning community, and a paid stipend for participation.

Takeaways: Attendees will build an understanding of the challenges educators face in finding quality materials and how EdReports supports educators to address those challenges, through resources supporting smart adoption processes and opportunities to participate in educator-led review teams.

Speakers

Shannon Wachowski (EdReports.org: Fort Collins, CO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Chicago 2022 K-8 V2.pdf

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Exploring OpenSciEd from Carolina

McCormick Place - W471a

Sponsoring Company: Carolina Biological Supply Co.

Come experience a model lesson from OpenSciEd for Middle School and see how the new Carolina Certified Edition makes these high-quality instructional materials even better!

Takeaways: 1. Experience the pedagogy of OpenSciEd through a model lesson; 2. Learn ways to encourage equitable classroom discourse; and 3. Create a Driving Question Board to explore real-world phenomena.

Speakers

Cory Ort (Carolina Biological Supply Co.: Burlington, NC)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way of doing the right thing

McCormick Place - W175c

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way to engage the community in STEM. Participants will hear from educators that have won money for their school and communities to implement STEM action projects.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how they can receive cash awards and acknowledge for STEM action projects.

Speakers

John Anderson (Toshiba America Foundation: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Transforming Teaching Through Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Carnegie Corporation of New York released a challenge paper calling on the education field to transform teaching and learning through the elements and essentials of curriculum-based professional learning. Learn how schools and systems are helping teachers experience the instruction their students experience to help change instructional practices, leading to better student outcomes.

Takeaways: 1. Explore the rationale for a challenge paper dedicated solely to the issue of curriculum-based professional learning; 2. Discover the 10 elements and three essentials of professional learning critical to effective implementation of high-quality science instructional materials; and 3. Consider implications of the roles and responsibilities for putting into action the elements of curriculum-based professional learning.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Using Three-dimensional Assessment Prompts to Drive Student Sense-making

McCormick Place - W175c

The Vision set forth by A Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards emphasize science as the integration of practices (SEPs), content (DCIs), and big ideas (CCCs). By using all three dimensions, students are able to make sense of phenomena while learning science concepts and processes. However, this way of thinking and learning takes practice and guidance. Teachers play a pivotal role in helping their students to engage with this kind of science learning. Therefore, they must find ways to explicitly integrate and embed all three dimensions in activities, lessons, and assessments. This participatory presentation will explore how teachers can explicitly embed SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs into prompts (questions and guiding statements) to promote more integrated opportunities for student sense-making. By generating prompts that include SEPs, DCIs, and CCCs, teachers can guide students to think in a more three-dimensional way and gain the skills to do so outside of the classroom. Attendees will identify strategies for posing integrated prompts, consider the benefits of multi-dimensional prompts for students, practice asking and improving prompts, and apply these strategies to use in their own classroom context.

Takeaways: Creating prompts (questions and guiding statements) that explicitly promote the three dimensions can drive more integrated, equitable student learning

Speakers

Ana Houseal (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY), Clare Gunshenan (University of Wyoming: Laramie, WY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Guide Writing Coherent 3-D Prompts
3D Prompts_PPT_NSTA Chicago2022.pdf

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Classroom Communities that Thrive through Camaraderie and Connection

McCormick Place - W185a