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2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 42 results

Wednesday, July 20
11:45 AM - 12:45 PM
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Lunch: Elements of Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Regency Ballroom

By Invitation Only

Shifting from traditional professional development to curriculum-based professional learning is a simple concept but complex to design and execute well. At its core, it means teachers experience the same kind of inquiry-based learning we expect them to provide their students. Learn more about a Carnegie Corporation of New York report, The Elements, which identifies a core set of research-based actions, approaches, and enabling conditions that effective schools and systems have put in place to reinforce and amplify the power of high-quality curriculum and skillful teaching.

Takeaways: 1. Examine beliefs and assumptions regarding the relationship between high-quality instructional materials, curriculum-based professional learning and student success 2. Gain understanding of the foundation for The Elements, a challenge paper from Carnegie Corporation of New York 3. Learn from science practitioners whose successful curriculum implementation efforts are grounded in the elements and essentials.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a Brand New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

Since its release, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the NGSS has become an essential tool for many educators across the country. A new version titled the Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimension has been developed to not only support teachers in all states that have standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education. This new version of the Quick-Reference Guide still contains the most useful features of the original, including descriptions of the practices and the crosscutting concepts from the Framework of K-12 Science Education and K-12 progressions of the elements of all three dimensions. In addition, the new Quick-Reference Guide contains several new features that should make it even more helpful. For example, every element now has a unique code (based on the codes in the NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions) that makes it much easier to reference a particular element. In addition, there is an entire chapter devoted to the Performance Expectations. Finally, the guide also contains a number of tools for working with standards. This session will outline all of the features of the guide through the process of unpacking the crosscutting concepts to better understand how to make curriculum, instruction, and assessment more three-dimensional.

Takeaways: A deeper understanding of the Crosscutting Concepts and how a well-designed reference guide can make it easier to unpack the three dimensions for work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

Speakers

Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Engaging with Data using CODAP in InquiryHub 3D Storylined Biology

McCormick Place - W196a

Analyzing and interpreting data and using mathematical and computational reasoning are complex at the high school level, which requires students to employ correlational and causational thinking while manipulating visualizations using tools. CODAP, a product of the Concord Consortium, is designed to give students access to these powerful practices with minimal software requirements and with a mission to make data literacy accessible for all students. InquiryHub uses CODAP to provide students with agency because they can determine the variables of interest, in which to create graphical representations from the same data set. In our free, open-source program, students can work with authentic datasets from the CODAP website, data they gather, or data from professional studies. Inside our storyline instructional sequences, inquiryHub leverages CODAP as students analyze the rainfall on the Serengeti and how it correlates to wildebeest populations. In the session, participants will try out CODAP by adding multiple variables of data to answer the question, “What’s happening to large animals on the Serengeti plain?” and how to apply CODAP in their classroom.

Takeaways: CODAP can be used in many different three-dimensional ways to have students analyze and interpret data to make sense of phenomena while providing student agency.

Speakers

Kerri Wingert (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Using Online Investigations with Digitized Specimens to Enhance Data Literacy and Scientific Reasoning

McCormick Place - W181c

Online investigations with digitized specimens offer broad opportunities for teachers to engage their students in authentic scientific research. EPIC Bioscience investigations are free, online, NGSS-aligned research investigations that guide students to participate in science practices: asking a question, collecting data, analyzing and interpreting findings, and communicating to others. Investigations use specimens from natural history collections in entomology, vertebrate zoology, mycology, and botany to provide fully-supported, online investigations centered on real phenomena and aligned to NGSS MSLS2-1 through NGSS MSLS2-4. These investigations offer key opportunities to enhance scientific literacy through effective sensemaking with student-collected data on compelling specimens. This session focuses on two key goals to help teachers support sensemaking during phenomena-based student investigations: (1) Identifying and remediating common student errors and confusion during data collection and analysis. (2) Practicing effective instructional strategies focused on enhancing students’ scientific reasoning and data interpretation. This session will involve hands-on experiences with student activities, as well as interactive discussion of classroom examples and evidence.

Takeaways: Identify common student errors and sources of confusion during data collection, analysis, and interpretation and deploy strategies designed to enhance student sensemaking from data.

Speakers

Kirsten Butcher (The University of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT), Madlyn Larson (Natural History Museum of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

EPIC Bioscience - Specimen Measurement Guide
A visual guide to measuring specimens, with examples and non-examples.
EPIC Bioscience - Data Interpretation Guide
Visual student guide to interpreting data patterns, with examples and non-examples.

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Did I really just flip this classroom?

McCormick Place - W185a

The purpose of the presentation is to model how to flip a classroom from the traditional methods to more innovative methods to engage students. The participants will be able to create a deck by the end of the session. Participants will be given the background and research based strategies that Pear Deck uses to ensure that equity and inclusion are met while ensuring the seamless integration of the platform. Participants will be given the pedagogy of why this tool is needed in their classroom. Participants will be introduced to EdPuzzle and Screencastify to highlight how these tools can be used as well to flip their classrooms. A Pear Deck interactive slide will be presented to the audience. The audience will log in with the given code. As I present the audience will have my screen on their device. The audience will participate in a series of interactive activities designed to immerse them platform and give them the experience that students will have. The presentation is highly interactive with the first half of the presentation be using to interact with the platforms and the second half given for participants to explore and ask questions. The audience will be engaged with device-based activities from the beginning to the end of the presentation. The presentation style will be catch and release. I will capture their attention for some time and then I will release them to navigate through the platforms while I offer support. Attendees will learn how to create a Pear Deck, a screencastify recording and how to navigate through EdPuzzle to either create or utilize existing videos. Attendees will learn how to take the materials they are already using to flip them into a more blended learning model. The attendees will walk away with a Deck that can be used immediately in their classroom and my information to reach out to me if they have any questions during implementation.

Takeaways: Participants will walk away with the basic knowledge of how to flip their classroom and be able to implement the strategies immediately into their classroom so that they are able to increase equity and inclusion.

Speakers

Cecelia Gillam (Hahnville High School: Boutee, LA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation note taking worksheet

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

One of the key features of the NGSS and other standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education is the idea that a “a progression of knowledge occurs from grade band to grade band that gives students the opportunity to learn more complex material, leading to an overall understanding of science by the end of high school.” (NGSS Appendix A, p. 2) The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions has a set of 62 maps that illustrate the how the elements of the three dimensions build on each other and connect to one another. Each map focuses on a particular topic and shows the progression students are expected to make in that topic from one grade-span to the next. Arrows connecting individual elements on a map indicate that competency in one element is useful in learning to achieve the other element. Educators can use maps to deepen their understanding of the standards to plan or improve curriculum, instruction, and assessment. This session will provide participants guidance on how to read the maps in the Atlas and use this powerful tool to deepen their understanding of elements of the standards.

Takeaways: A careful review of the connections between elements of the three dimensions can provide a clearer understanding of science standards and important guidance in planning instructional sequences to support three-dimensional teaching and learning.

Speakers

Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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The STEM of PBL

McCormick Place - W179b

Participants will understand how to develop and effectively implement STEM curriculum units that include project based activities and performance based assessments. Participants will learn to help students answer complex questions and develop solutions for challenges and real-world problems. They will also assist students with extending and refining their acquired knowledge to routinely analyze and solve problems. By the end of this session: 1) Participants will gain a clear and coherent understanding of what a STEM PBL is and how it works. 2) Participants will be able to identify and create effective essential questions. 3) Participants will be able to identify and apply the components of a STEM PBL. 4) Understand how STEM PBL’s will impact instruction for participants and students. Agenda: What is PBL? Why is it important? How does a STEM PBL Work? How to effectively integrate journal reflections. Ways to Implement STEM PBL’s

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to effectively implement STEM PBL’s (Project Based Learning) by integrating the components of STEM and PBL in order to grow students' capacity for creativity, fun, and back-loaded learning in a STEM context.

Speakers

Adero Carter (Clayton County Public Schools: Jonesboro, GA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

What Is PBL_ARTICLE.pdf
Why Is PBL Important_ARTICLE.pdf
Projects VS PBL.docx
_Main_Course.pdf
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HyFVEpZyEY
STEM PBL in action
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1c38TeuqPSC-vS8GLiVXQH9GzI7g0sjbx/view?usp=sharing
STEM PBL in action
http://bit.ly/STEMPBLQA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
Guiding questions
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
The Engineering Design Process/Journal Reflections

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Creating Digital Works with iPad in the Science Classroom

McCormick Place - W186b

From cartoon strips to mini documentaries, students can create digital works that show their science understanding. Having an all in one tool like the iPad allows students to show growth in their understanding with exciting, creative projects. Capturing videos, sounds and photos begins the student journey in learning. This session will begin with the why and move into the how. Sharing free apps for creation, the presenter will demonstrate the power of student creation. We will also highlight the various ways to assess and publish these student projects.

Takeaways: Attendees will leave this session with ready to go ideas for digital creation using iPad in the science classroom. Student samples from an 8th grade science classroom will be shared.

Speakers

Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Leah LaCrosse NSTA Bulb Page
This page will give access to presentations in pdf and original files.

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Executive Function Supports for Creating Inclusive Science Classrooms

McCormick Place - W179a

Come learn about simple, applicable strategies to support your students' executive function skills in the science classroom, with an emphasis on project planning, organization, flexible thinking, and time management.

Takeaways: Attendees will identify the educational impact of the 11 main executive functions, as well as learn concrete strategies for supporting their students in both general and special education settings.

Speakers

Krista Northcutt (New Way Academy: Phoenix, AZ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Presentation 7_21 (1).pdf
EF Supports for Inclusive Science Classrooms Presentation PDF
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1TUPMxotRYq0ZsboPp7i1jxMVKthb0vnv?usp=sharing

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Expanding Participation and Success in STEM Teaching Through Partnerships

McCormick Place - W181a

Ideas and concrete strategies for building collaborative, generative partnerships with community groups, nonprofits, preK–12 schools, museums, and community colleges in order to transform the STEM ecosystem and preservice teachers' futures will be shared.

Takeaways: Participants will: 1. hear from different partners about the generative ways we have collaborated to increase diversity in our STEM teacher preparation program; 2. engage in discussion and planning next steps for reaching out to a potential collaborative partner; and 3. learn about the ways in which preservice STEM Noyce Scholars have strengthened their STEM Identity and have been prepared to design culturally sustaining curricula and classrooms that integrate sensemaking.

Speakers

Sydney Worthen-Jenkins (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Nicole Hebert (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Bonnie Maur (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Kristin Rainville (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Using GeoSpatial Data to Teach Climate Justice

McCormick Place - W176a

Let's discuss the expansion and availability of geospatial data (arcGIS, EJScreen, CalAdapt) to examine environmental justice issues in their own community and create climate resilience action plans for an authentic audience (city council, school district, state lawmakers).

Takeaways: Attendees will explore strategies for using geospatial data to examine, interpret, and act on place-based environmental justice issues in their communities.

Speakers

Nancy Metzger-Carter (Sonoma Academy: Santa Rosa, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation
Resources, curriculum, lesson plans, sample case studies of student advocacy
Link to Schools for Climate Action Campaign
Free resources for student advocacy for climate justice on local, state and federal level.

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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A Model for Recruiting and Retaining Hispanic Students in STEM Fields

McCormick Place - W181b

Learn how to create a pipeline, beginning in elementary school, to engage Hispanic students in STEM fields.

Takeaways: Develop and implement a pipeline from elementary school to community college in STEM subjects to engage Hispanic students.

Speakers

Kelly Moore-Roberts (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN), Elesha Goodfriend (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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That doesn't look like a science fair!

McCormick Place - W179a

This session is designed to help teachers deepen their understanding of the effective and practical strategies needed to facilitate a successful science fair competition or symposium in either a face-to-face or hybrid environment. Participants will be provided with a variety of instructional strategies and free curriculum materials to ensure that all students have access to a social learning platform that will encourage opportunities to collaborate with peers and mentors through intentional planning. The instructional strategies used in this presentation will promote student engagement, differentiation, and scientific understanding to help form a more inclusive learning environment within the classroom and within the district community.

Takeaways: --Participants will experience a variety of impactful instructional strategies that promote authentic scientific research and presentation to promote access to equitable future opportunities for students regarding college and/or career endeavors

Speakers

Angela McMurry (The Ohio Academy of Science: Dublin, OH)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Incorporating the 3 Rs of Animal Use in High School Science Classes

McCormick Place - W175a

A cross-disciplinary team of teachers, subject matter experts, and curriculum developers have designed resources and materials to facilitate teaching students about the use of animals in scientific research in the United States, as well as Russell and Burch’s 3 Rs principles of replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal use. The materials, which are aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, are geared toward high school science students. The modules can be taught separately or in combination, giving educators flexibility to choose specific content areas to share and explore with their students. During the session, we will present two learning plans: one that introduces students to the 3 Rs principles and how animals are used in scientific research, and another that covers the 3 Rs principles in more depth. We will share information, including teaching plans, learning materials, and performance assessment tasks associated with the curriculum, with session attendees.

Takeaways: Attendees will have an opportunity to learn more about the content and activities covered in two lesson plans focused on the use of animals in scientific research in the United States and the 3 Rs principles. Sample lesson plans and associated learning materials, including presentations, articles, and worksheets, will be shared with attendees.

Speakers

Pam Osenkowski (National Anti-Vivisection Society: Chicago, IL)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Planning More Accessible Science Lessons with Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

McCormick Place - W184d

In this presentation we will start with an existing basic physical science lesson that uses disciplinary core ideas on electricity, the engineering practice of making a model by constructing a basic electrical circuit, and the cross-cutting concept of cause and effect (closing the circuit starts current flow and turns on the light). We will then modify it using Universal Design for Learning (UDL) so it is more accessible, especially for students with disabilities. UDL encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson and gives students several ways to acquire the lesson knowledge, Multiple means of expression allows the students several choices in how they can “show what they know” and multiple means of engagement offers learners offers appropriate challenges to get students interested and motivated. Planning or modifying lessons using UDL not only makes lessons more accessible, but it also makes lessons more engaging for all students in inclusive classrooms.

Takeaways: 1) Universal Design for Learning (UDL) encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson. Use of UDL makes lessons more engaging for all students. 2) Applying UDL (Universal Design for Learning) will make the lesson more accessible, especially for students with special needs. 3) You may start with a lesson you already have. It is not necessary to develop a lesson from scratch when using UDL.

Speakers

Mary Ellen O'Donnell (The Help Group: Los Angeles, CA), Gargi Adhikari (Holland Brook School: Whitehouse Station, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pdf
Final Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pptx
Speaking like a scientist.pdf - Inv. Part 1.pdf
Claims and evidence.jpg
Debate.jpg

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Promoting Equity for Girls Through Purposeful STEM Clubs

McCormick Place - W187b

Learn how to assist educators in facilitating purposeful STEM clubs for elementary girls, focusing on strategies promoting female student achievement, confidence, and interest in science.

Takeaways: 1. Strategies to establish and facilitate STEM clubs that are fun, develop collaboration, actively combat stereotypes, and provide students with female role models in the STEM community; 2. An exploration of options for club formats and in-class applications, possible equity protocols, as well as a discussion of potential barriers and possible solutions for educators; and 3. Tools and resources for further research and strategies.

Speakers

David Rosengrant (University of South Florida St. Petersburg: St. Petersburg, FL), Nicole Caltabellotta (Mt. Vernon Elementary: St. Petersburg, FL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Chicago Presentation.pptx

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Energizing Students for Greater Energy Savings

McCormick Place - W175c

Energy is the second largest expenditure in American schools. Managing energy use in a school setting is difficult without having students, faculty, and staff engaged and actively participating in a management program. This presentation will serve as the steppingstone for how to conduct one’s own educational energy audit in their classroom and school building. The hands-on investigations turn the school building into a living laboratory to explore energy efficiency, monitor energy use, and decide on the best behavioral changes based on data collected. The lessons introduce students to the concepts of energy, energy consumption, economic and environmental effects of the energy industry and its consumers, and the difference between conservation and efficiency. Activities encourage the development of cooperative learning, math, science, comparison and contrast, public speaking, and critical thinking skills. By engaging students in an energy management program, you have hundreds of enthusiastic mini energy managers ready to help identify things like broken water fountains, leaky doors or windows, inappropriate lighting use, vampire loads, and unwanted temperature variations within their own building. Students take ownership of their school and take better care of it while leading their peers to be conscientious users of energy. They learn these skills to bring back to their home and community.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn hands-on activities that introduce students to the ways in which we use energy in the home and at school while helping teach students to take ownership and lead their peers to be conscientious users of energy.

Speakers

Cori Nelson (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA)

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Build a K–12 STEAM Pipeline Through Family STEAM Night

McCormick Place - W180

Engage students, families, and the community in STEAM through Family STEAM Nights in order to equitably build understanding and interest in STEAM.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to create, recruit, and implement a Family STEAM Night to engage students, families, and the community in STEAM.

Speakers

McKenna Serowka (Lake Zurich High School: Lake Zurich, IL)

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Digging Deeper into the Data with an Adapted CER Framework

McCormick Place - W185b-c

This session focuses on improved outcomes for students’ written science explanations when including data description prompts and instructional facilitation to adapt the CER framework.

Takeaways: Learn about the importance of a preliminary step of incorporating data descriptions when utilizing the CER framework to guide students’ written explanations and reasoning of data visualization.

Speakers

Andrea Drewes (Rider University: Lawrenceville, NJ)

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Building a Better ADI Understanding: Using Student-Created Avatars to Explain Past Scientist Experiences with ADI

McCormick Place - W176a

This presentation reviews students researching and presenting on past ADI events in science through the creation of scientist avatars.

Takeaways: 1. This session highlights the use of a classroom-tested assignment where students are asked to create a personal avatar where they are pretending to be the actual scientist; and 2. The assignment works well to show actual ADI events that explain how science changes over time.

Speakers

William Sumrall (The University of Mississippi: University, MS)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Robots in Science! Integrating robotics and computational thinking into middle school science classrooms

McCormick Place - W181b

Robotics activities can be an engaging and innovative way to help students learn core science concepts, while also introducing engineering design and computer programming. In this session, participants will learn about three robotics activities that help students engage with physical science concepts. Educators will hear about: (1) an activity involving speed and acceleration. Through a combination of activities students explored and calculated speed. After walking and running at intervals, students built vehicles to show speed and acceleration, ultimately graphing data to compare constant speed and acceleration; (2) ways in which students applied knowledge and skills learned during a PLTW Design and Modeling class as they designed and built a prototype toy for use in therapy with children with Cerebral Palsy or other disabilities; (3) how students used robots to explain a concept from a light and sound unit to peers and students from younger grades. Students selected one of the concepts from a light and sound unit, made a display, built a robot, and prepared a presentation to explain their concept and how it works in the world outside our classroom.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how using robotics activities in science and engineering classes can support and enhance students’ learning of physical science concepts, while also engaging students in problem solving and engineering design processes.

Speakers

Richard Shroyer (Logos Lab School: Richmond, IN), Tiauna Washington (Hibberd Intermediate School: Richmond, IN), Debra Bernstein (TERC: Cambridge, MA), McCall Emerick (Acmetonia Elementary School: Cheswick, PA)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Formative Fundamentals - Designing meaningful assessment opportunities in an inclusive science curriculum

McCormick Place - W181c

In this session, we will look at current research on the purpose and method of formative assessment. We will then pair the research with student work samples to examine different methods of providing meaningful and actionable feedback to encourage student growth. We will also reflect on our assessment practices through the lens of creating equitable classrooms to ensure that all of our students learn at their potential. This session’s formative assessment focus will also extend to designing science storylines with an emphasis on universal design for learning. We will highlight tools that all students can use in order to have access to content. We will examine opportunities for incorporating social-emotional learning in meaningful ways as we strive to encourage all students to think like scientists. We will culminate the session with a discussion on intentionally cultivating student agency. Join this interactive session to elevate how you are using formative assessment to drive student learning.

Takeaways: Attendees will leave with practical classroom strategies for elevating the importance of formative assessment and meaningful feedback to foster student inclusive science classrooms.

Speakers

Mike Jones (Illinois State University: Normal, IL)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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The Scoop on STEM Competitions Administered by NSTA

McCormick Place - W176a

Join us for a chance to learn more about  NSTA-administered competitions and awards from NSTA staff and past participants. NSTA-administered competitions include NSTA Teacher Awards, the Army Educational Outreach Program, Shell Science Lab Regional Challenge, and Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision competitions. This engaging hour will include discussion and tips on how to engage K–12 students in project-based learning opportunities that are no cost to participate.

Takeaways: 1. Engage with educators that have participated in NSTA-administered competitions and awards; 2. Learn more about opportunities to engage students in project-based learning; and 3. Share best practices and tips to foster inquiry-based learning and showcase ideas.

Speakers

Acacia McKenna (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Competitions_ presentation.pdf

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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STEM + Empathy in Use in the Design of an Improved Bionic Arm

McCormick Place - W185d

Empathic engineering design can help develop students’ cultural competence as well as inform the design of more useful innovations for people with limb differences.

Takeaways: School-based activities that are oriented toward improving community members’ lives can simultaneously support the development of students’ cultural competence and integrated STEM literacy.

Speakers

Susan Meabh Kelly (University of Connecticut: Storrs Mansfield, CT), Brittany Klimowicz (NYC iSchool: New York, NY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Slides
Session slides with links to all resources and contact information

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Creating K-6 STEM Classrooms That Embrace Science Inquiry: Helping Students Think and Work Like Scientists - Exploring, Asking Questions, and Seeking Sense-Making of Scientific Phenomena

McCormick Place - W178a

Science inquiry is a powerful process and learning environment that embraces exploration and sense-making, as students question phenomena and explore real world science/STEM. Inquiry is an “attitude” that seeks understanding and continually questions how our natural world works. Student achievement, engagement, and sense-making of phenomena, increase when students are taught in an instructional environment that embraces inquiry, where students are encouraged to ask questions, gather evidence, seek answers, and formulate explanations. Speaker will discuss the many varied ways that inquiry manifests itself in the elementary STEM classroom, including ways to increase participation of ELL’s. She will actively engage participants, as she shares strategies and lesson ideas that promote inquiry, and as she demonstrates effective questioning, modeling how to guide students in their own questioning and explorations, as they gather data, formulate their explanations, and draw conclusions. Speaker will emphasize the importance of ‘testing’ the ‘known’, as well as the ‘unknown’, so students can validate their processes and thinking. Creating environments of inclusivity, collaboration, cooperation, and sharing of ideas will be emphasized. Participants will embrace the power that inquiry offers: content, strategies, process, engagement, and the desire to ask, answer, and understand scientific phenomena. This session will help teachers establish effective classroom practices, guiding students in understanding the ways scientists think and study our natural world, as teachers nurture students’ sustained curiosity and love of science/STEM. Handouts.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to create STEM classroom environments that fully embrace and create the inquiry process: emphasizing explorations, the formulation of questions to guide student inquiry and their understanding of scientific phenomena, the importance of collaborative sense-making and assuring the inclusivity of ALL students, the importance of assisting ELL’s with language accessibility, and the fulfillment of learner curiosity as part of the sense-making process and as a trajectory for guiding their continual learning.

Speakers

Donna Knoell (Educational and Technology Consultant: Overland Park, KS)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Getting Carried Away: The UpLab

McCormick Place - W176a

Using the Dual Range Force Sensor, participants will determine how many helium balloons are needed to lift themselves and the house from Disney’s film Up.

Takeaways: 1. Using the phenomenon of the helium balloon lifted house from the movie "Up," attendees will leave with a lab using the Dual Range Force Sensor to determine the amount of balloons needed to lift themselves and the house; and 2. the session will show how this can be used for any level of student, and as a bonus will also incorporate how the data collection and analysis can be collected using Python coding.

Speakers

Todd Graba (Crystal Lake South High School: Crystal Lake, IL), Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Engaging with Your STEM Ecosystem Through After-School Programs: Lessons from Science Olympiad

McCormick Place - W179b

A challenge that STEM education presents to educators is how to stay current in an ever-evolving field to accurately represent and engage their students with new topics, activities, and careers. Too often STEM teachers become locked-in on a set of topics, activities, and careers because of the resources and opportunities to which they have access. After-school programs, and their ability to foster partnerships within a school’s larger STEM ecosystem, are one mechanism to open up STEM programs within schools to new topics, activities, and careers while offering avenues for professional growth and learning for the classroom teacher. By introducing the Science Olympiad program and the strategies used by our school participants for over three decades to build partnerships, connect to their STEM ecosystem, and expand learning we intend to help attendees draw parallels to their STEM ecosystems and their after-school programs. Building off of this information, attendees will analyze and discuss ways their STEM ecosystem can contribute to their STEM program, develop approaches for asking ecosystem members for support, and recognize opportunities to grow their STEM program through after-school programs. The session will close with a discussion of attendees’ specific challenges and issues ensuring attendees leave with actionable solutions.

Takeaways: The big takeaway from this session will attendees examining their STEM ecosystem to identify potential partners who align with their programming and can support student learning.

Speakers

John Loehr (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Making Quality Science and STEM Instruction Accessible and Equitable for ALL K-6 Students: Employing Differentiation Strategies and Resources to Advance Achievement, Engagement, Assure Inclusivity, and Meet the Unique Needs of ALL Learners

McCormick Place - W178a

Educators have a mandate to provide quality science/STEM instruction for ALL students, but making instruction accessible to every student presents enormous challenges. In order to teach students with broad ranging abilities and experiences, differentiating science/STEM instruction is imperative. We must differentiate instruction to accommodate the differences in readiness and background knowledge, fluency and facility with English, differences in learning styles, and the broad range of student interests that comprise our schools. Accessibility, inclusivity, and collaboration must be assured for special needs and ELL learners, whose instructional needs can definitely be accommodated with effective differentiation strategies and resources. When teachers differentiate, they enhance learning, creating environments where instruction and assessment are matched to student abilities and needs. Differentiation is an approach involving numerous strategies, while students all access the same curriculum. Content, process, and products can all be differentiated. Students who lack experience and background knowledge can have targeted instruction, to provide hands-on explorations and build knowledge. Likewise, gifted students can extend and expand their science/STEM experiences, keeping them challenged and interested. Presenter will offer strategies and exploration ideas, tiered assignments that increase levels of complexity, instructional grouping and collaboration techniques, and suggest a variety of resources, to enable teachers to advance and evaluate student learning for ALL children. Attendees will actively engage with discourse and exploration of hands-on resources.

Takeaways: 1. Attendees will learn differentiation strategies to engage all learners actively with hands-on explorations, assuring collaboration and accessibility for ALL, incorporating collaborative explorations where students of varying abilities share the learning experience, to advance learning and deepen conceptual understanding and sense-making for all K-6 students.

Speakers

Donna Knoell (Educational and Technology Consultant: Overland Park, KS)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way of doing the right thing

McCormick Place - W175c

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way to engage the community in STEM. Participants will hear from educators that have won money for their school and communities to implement STEM action projects.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how they can receive cash awards and acknowledge for STEM action projects.

Speakers

John Anderson (Toshiba America Foundation: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Transforming Teaching Through Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Carnegie Corporation of New York released a challenge paper calling on the education field to transform teaching and learning through the elements and essentials of curriculum-based professional learning. Learn how schools and systems are helping teachers experience the instruction their students experience to help change instructional practices, leading to better student outcomes.

Takeaways: 1. Explore the rationale for a challenge paper dedicated solely to the issue of curriculum-based professional learning; 2. Discover the 10 elements and three essentials of professional learning critical to effective implementation of high-quality science instructional materials; and 3. Consider implications of the roles and responsibilities for putting into action the elements of curriculum-based professional learning.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Classroom Communities that Thrive through Camaraderie and Connection

McCormick Place - W185a

It takes time and intentionality to build a community of learners who trust each other, respect differing perspectives, share ideas freely, and seek feedback from their peers. This session explores a variety of strategies that can be easily implemented to build this culture and community from day one. Strategies that foster this type of connection, collaboration, and camaraderie will be discussed using examples and tips to implement in the classroom, starting with some fresh ideas for getting to know students and helping them get to know their classmates. Many of these ideas combine strategies we already know and add a collaborative and inclusive spin to them. Allowing for multiple types of student interaction is important to ensure all voices are heard and valued, not just the loud and proud. Including time for students to process independently, in small groups, and in the large group is important to developing an inclusive community. A variety of strategies will be shared to support these levels of interaction in the classroom, making student thinking visible in individual, small group, and whole group displays.

Takeaways: Teachers can elevate their practices to include all students and develop a classroom culture that invites student interaction, increases student engagement, and fosters equitable experiences on a daily basis.

Speakers

Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Classroom Communities that Thrive through Camaraderie and Connection Folder

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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A River Story: Designing STEM Learning Experiences in an Equitable Context for Young Learners with Diverse Backgrounds

McCormick Place - W184b-c

Dive into (equitable) three-dimensional learning and promote STEM teaching and sensemaking strategies that place equity at the center of learning, making science connections to local context.

Takeaways: Explore how placing equity at the center of STEM education changed teacher attitudes about science teaching and learning, developed supportive networks for formal and informal educators to advance science education, created opportunities for teachers to design three-dimensional learning experiences, and provided equitable opportunities for students and families in an urban high-needs district.

Speakers

Elizabeth Nunez (New Brunswick Public Schools: New Brunswick, NJ), Sarah Sterling-Laldee (Paterson Public Schools: Paterson, NJ), Ashley Delgado-D'Amore (Lord Stirling Community School: New Brunswick, NJ), Grace Lugo (New Brunswick Public Schools: New Brunswick, NJ)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Let Me Upgrade Ya!- Science Pedagogy (The Hip Hop Edition)

McCormick Place - W181b

Let Me Upgrade Ya! This fun and engaging session is designed for science teachers, teacher leaders, instructional coaches, administrators, and anyone else who enjoys teaching. Participants will explore researched based strategies for engaging the brain and retaining information. Reviewing the research of these strategies will give validation for their classroom use. A demonstration of the strategy will create buy in and a reference point for all participants on how they can implement these strategies in their classroom. This session will engage participants to actively dance, sing, draw, reflect, and play games all while learning science. The researched based strategies that will be highlighted in this session promote the diversity of learners in every classroom and multi-learning styles.

Takeaways: Participants will learn high leverage strategies to engage students in science instruction.

Speakers

Jeremy Harden (Dallas ISD: Dallas, TX)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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STEM is LIT!

McCormick Place - W193a

Through the 2021-2022 school year, Pulaski County Special School District sought to scale inclusive STEM experiences throughout grades K-5. Considering the need for sense-making opportunities provided in an inclusive and culturally relevant environment, a new districtwide initiative was birthed- STEM is Lit! STEM is LIT! seeks to take culturally relevant literature as the framework for authentic STEM experiences through sense-making practices. The idea is simple. Find a culturally relevant and diverse piece of literature. Frame a STEM challenge experience around this piece of literature. Design authentic lesson plans and resources for teachers to implement these challenges in their schools. Organize your supplies. Support your teachers and students. By creating districtwide monthly STEM challenges for all students in grades K-5, PCSSD was able to integrate literacy with mathematical sense-making, scientific inquiry, and the engineering design process creating memories that will last a life time. In addition to monthly challenges, STEM is Lit! also became the driving bus behind the Deputy Superintendent's book club for all 4th graders throughout the district, where a special STEM challenge was added and performed at each elementary in the district. This presentation seeks to share those authentic practices that can be scaled in any district to expose broad elementary audiences to equitable STEM experiences and conversation.

Takeaways: How can districts expand STEM experiences through culturally relevant and inclusive practices in a large-scaled initiative?

Speakers

Justin Luttrell (Pulaski County Special School District: Little Rock, AR), Alesia Smith (Pulaski County Special School District: Littel Rock, AR)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

STEM is LIT!

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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What is Happening to the Rusty Patched Bumblebee?

McCormick Place - W195

Did you know that the Rusty Patched Bumblebee has lost 80% of its range in the last 20 years? Today, it is the first native pollinator to be put on the endangered species list. Why is this happening? And why should you care? Come explore a unit that guides students in using science and engineering practices to make sense of the functioning of the Rusty Patched Bumblebee’s ecosystem. From data on climate change to theories of pathogen spread, students grapple with all that science knows to date and create their own model for how changes to that system are impacting this keystone species. Learning is then extended beyond the walls of the classroom when students engage in intergenerational conversations and design actionable solutions to help this endangered native pollinator. Links to teacher guides and free printable and editable files will be shared with participants. This lesson will be shared through the perspective of a 7th grade life science teacher Amanda Mellenthin and her students, but is appropriate for grades 6-12. This unit is created by NFP: OnlyOneSky and information about the unit is found on skydayproject.com.

Takeaways: Participants will walk through a high quality NGSS lesson that they can adapt to their classroom and supportive teacher resources.

Speakers

Amanda Mellenthin (Carriel Junior High School: O Fallon, IL)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Creating a Science Classroom Podcast

McCormick Place - W187c

Marshall Escamilla, one of the co-hosts of the freely-available Tumble Science Podcast for Kids, will share some of the basics of creating a podcast with your class. Classroom podcasts are a great way for students to share their learning with the broader community, and can be used both as assessment and communication tools--and it's a lot easier to do than you'd think. Beginning with a brief description of what features make Tumble free and accessible, Marshall will walk educators through all the thing they'll need to consider when creating a podcast. We'll start by asking questions like: -Who is the intended audience for this podcast? -What is the overall topic for it? -How many episodes do we want to create, and how often do we want to release them? Then we'll move on to some of the technical elements. What are the requirements for creating a podcast studio in your classroom? What equipment do you need to buy? What software do students need to have access to? how do you ensure that students can have access to what they need in order to be successful? Finally, we will discuss some of the basic skills teachers will need to ensure student success: knowledge of best audio recording practices, and how to use a few easily-accessible software tools to make students' work sound its best.

Takeaways: Attendees at this ession will learn the very basics of how to create a classroom podcast from a professional podcaster.

Speakers

Marshall Escamilla (Tumble Media Production: Greenfield, MA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Podcasting NSTA Session Resources

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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4-H, STEM and Entrepreneurship...Oh My!

McCormick Place - W181b

Learn how Ohio 4-H and the Ohio Academy of Science have partnered to offer the a free STEM entrepreneurial program for junior high and high school students. Educators will participate in activities that will showcase student-centered learning experiences that allows them to explore entrepreneurship in the formal classroom, home-school classroom or 4-H SPIN Club. The curriculum teaches students how to commercialize solutions to problems by developing a STEM Commercialization Plan or STEM Business Plan. The goal of the program is to create a culture of innovation. This is accomplished by focusing on the practical application of STEM and related fields and the development of an entrepreneurial mindset and the critical thinking skills students will need in the future.

Takeaways: This session will provide the tools needed to expand student participation in STEM by connecting classroom educators to the broad community of 4-H officers, leaders and facilitators.

Speakers

Angela McMurry (The Ohio Academy of Science: Dublin, OH), Mark Light (The Ohio State University: Columbus, OH)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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The Science of Student Engagement- How stress and the brain affect learning

McCormick Place - W181c

Students find science difficult or non-stimulating particularly when teachers do not consider cognitive, physiological, and socio-emotional disparities in students. Research has shown that engaging the appropriate parts of the brain helps students make a long-lasting, personalized connection to scientific concepts and practices. Studies show that discipline and learning problems in our classrooms may be associated with a lack of student engagement. Engaged students are less likely to be disruptive and are more likely to retain information longer. The focus of this presentation is to equip teachers with the pedagogical skills and strategies needed to drive student engagement and achievement by recognizing and addressing physiological, cognitive, and socio-emotional disparities in students based on an understanding of how a learner’s brain works. Participating teachers will explore the impact of emotions, storytelling, culturally relevant and hands-on learning on the forebrain and consequently on student engagement and comprehension. Teachers will learn to correctly harness the learning power of the forebrain, particularly, those of the hippocampus and amygdala, by appropriately employing suitable learning strategies. These will enhance student engagement, improve learning outcomes and increase academic achievement in the sciences.

Takeaways: Teachers will learn to correctly harness the learning power of the forebrain, particularly, those of the hippocampus and amygdala, by appropriately employing suitable learning strategies

Speakers

Chidi Duru (Prince George's County Public Schools: Upper Marlboro, MD)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Your Students Can Be the First to Annotate (Discover the Function of) a Gene in a Microorganism

McCormick Place - W195

This hands-on project guides students through discovering the function of a microorganism gene (whose function has not yet been determined), assigned uniquely to that student.

Takeaways: 1. Science is very exciting. Each student in the Geni-Act project will be the first person to discover the function of a gene in a microorganism. Results are entered into a national genome database; 2. The gene annotation process will be provided. Special tools or special knowledge are not required. There is no cost; and 3. Guidance for doing the annotation process with an inclusion class (a general education class with several special education students) will be provided.

Speakers

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Final NSTA Gene Annotation for Conference.pptx

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Using Audio to Enhance Science Learning

McCormick Place - W187c

In this panel discussion, we will discuss the ways that audio content like podcasts can be used in the classroom to increase student engagement. This discussion between several leaders in the field of audio education will share some of the ways that teachers can and should use audio content to enhance science learning at all grade levels.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to include audio in their lesson plans in ways that are effective, engaging, and inclusive.

Speakers

Marshall Escamilla (Tumble Media Production: Greenfield, MA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Podcasting NSTA Session Resources

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Lab Journals 2.0- Rethinking student-centered instructional practices

McCormick Place - W181a

Expectations on deeper learning and more rigor in our curriculums have led to increased demands on our students. As we collectively shifted from paper to digital, our access to tools improved but has our instruction kept pace? How do we prevent our curriculum from becoming simply a digital pencil with disconnected simulations and activities that fail to embrace high-quality scientific practices? In this session, we will examine how digital science journals can be used as a means for evidence collection and reflection on student learning. Together, we will focus on how students collect and analyze evidence in a variety of meaningful ways. Examples of primary sources will showcase how students can observe and categorize similarities to help answer a driving question. We will also examine best practices around using simulations to drive student inquiry. An emphasis on exploring data, from organization to manipulation will also be highlighted. Finally, we will showcase how AR and VR can be effectively used in the classroom to allow students to think and act like real scientists along with open-sourced 3D prints. Join me for an engaging session!

Takeaways: Attendees will be able to design educational opportunities focused on evidence collection and reflection to provide scientific arguments and explanations to a phenomenon.

Speakers

Mike Jones (Illinois State University: Normal, IL)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Get Real with School Gardens - Explore the Successes and Failures of the Carriel Garden in O'Fallon, IL

McCormick Place - W187c

The Carriel Garden is a space where students can explore and experiment in nature while learning about connections to society and citizenship. Starting from a school-wide lunch waste worm composting program, the Carriel Garden has flourished into problem-based learning experience for more than just science classes. This session focuses on the success and failures we have encountered along the way in creating a native pollinator patch, vegetable garden, and small school greenhouse at a junior high school in southern Illinois. The presenter, Mrs. Mellenthin, will share lessons she has experienced first hand with her 7th grade science students from learning the escape routines of monarch caterpillars, how to compost outside in Illinois winters, navigating the local farmers market to sell student grown plants, and techniques for running from gophers, deer, and other garden surprises. ;) Topics addressed in the session will include funding solutions, community connections, staff buy in, summer support, STEM connections, and many lessons learned. The session will end with an opportunity for participants to network with others, ask questions, and formulate solutions for their own school projects.

Takeaways: Attendees will gain practical examples of problem based learning in a school garden and gain ideas on how to set up or tackle issues in their own school garden spaces.

Speakers

Amanda Mellenthin (Carriel Junior High School: O Fallon, IL)