2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

All sessions added to My Agenda prior to this notice have been exported to the mobile app and will be visible in your account when the app launches. Any sessions added now, will also have to be added in the app.
Grade Level


Topics




























Strands









Session Type












Pathway/Course

FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Hands-On Workshop, Coping in Resilience in Science and STEM Teaching, STEM

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
25 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Lone Wolf: A Darwinian Speculative Thought Experiment

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W186a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Come join us as we participate in a Darwinian speculation reimagined as a Thought Experiment. This is a classic STEAM approach.

TAKEAWAYS:
See how to integrate the arts into STEM = STEAM.

SPEAKERS:
Christina Derusha (Science Teacher: , IL), Vito Dipinto (National Louis University at Wheeling: Wheeling, IL)

GMOs what do you know breakout

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Participants will organize in groups and receive clues and puzzles to learn about genetic modification then be tasked to “break out” unlocking BreakoutEDU boxes. Puzzles include myths and facts; GMO or not?; Misleading label; and general terms related to genetics, and recombinant DNA. This activity could be used as review of genetics concepts or as a way to engage learners in research about genetically modified organisms. Free curriculum is available from grownextgen.org.

TAKEAWAYS:
Dispelling many of the myths about genetically engineered crops. An engaging way to involve every student in the process of problem-solving. Introduction to more resources about the connection between agriculture and science concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Jane Hunt (Nourish the Future - Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

DCI, CCC, and SEPs, Oh My! Sweet and Salty Investigations with a 3-D Twist!

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
DCI, CCC, and SEPs Oh My! (2).pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Discover how to implement three-dimensional learning into any science curriculum, all while engaging learners to become phenomenal!

TAKEAWAYS:
How to use SEPs to drive student instruction and molecular-level modeling of processes using data to support claim.

SPEAKERS:
Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Chickenology: Food Delivery Challenge

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Lesson
Chickenology Food Delivery Challenge Slide Deck
Chickenology Student Rubric

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Participants will use sensemaking and the engineering design process to solve a real world food production problem in a small scale format. This lesson introduces the Food Delivery Challenge, in which participants must design a gravity feeder to carry food (chicken feed) to twelve hungry chickens for over 24 hours. To accomplish the task students must design and build a model of an efficient gravity feeder using the materials available to them. The scenario presented to the class: One of the feeders in your uncle’s barn has broken down, and a new one will not arrive until next month. You must create a gravity feeder to satisfy 12 chickens for 24 hours consistently to ensure the health of your flock. Participants will research, design, build and test their design before presenting to the group for feedback, Participants will then use the feedback to redesign for an improved feeder.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Use the engineering design process to collaborate, design and build a gravitational feeder system that will feed 10 pounds of feed over a 24 hour period. 2. Present your design plan, and final product to the class for feedback. 3. Provide feedback to the design team for design improvement.

SPEAKERS:
Leah LaCrosse (McCormick Junior High School: Huron, OH), Heather Bryan (Nourish the Future - Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Dumpster Dive with STEM

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dumpster Dive With STEM Participant Folder

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Connect the human impact of trash pollution to engineering design. Get your students thinking critically and creatively as they collaborate in real-world problem-solving. The global real-world issue of human-generated trash polluting local bodies of water is the main focus of this hands-on session. Using our partnership with the Howard County Conservancy, our students learn about their local watersheds and contribute to a Watershed Report Card. Students see how trash that is often found on our local schoolyards can affect our watershed, and they design a working model for trash removal in a local tributary. Basic coding will be used to design programs that will control sensors and motors through a microcontroller, thus removing the trash from the water source. The model will utilize solar and water power to move the trash into a separate receptacle. Various sensors will also be used to monitor water levels and determine the outcome of the program. This session will allow participants to find ways to increase the environmental stewardship of their students while incorporating engineering design into the science classroom. This project allows authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Design a project that enhances STEM skills in students such as collaboration, curiosity and creative problem solving.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Educational Consultant: Voorhees, NJ), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Using scientific data and data collection to make sense of real world phenomena!

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W176a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Chicago Packet.pdf
Copy of Opening (1).pptx

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Using data collection , participants will learn how to actively engage students in a conversation about data and the phenomena that it explains. Participants will learn how to create and/or modify old lessons, labs, and activities into opportunities for discussion , inquiry, and discovery using calculators, Nspire, and labquests.

TAKEAWAYS:
Create a dynamic lesson for use in the science classroom using data collection.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Coker (Camden Fairview High School: Camden, AR)

Engaging students in problem-based learning through environmental innovation challenges

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

The Innovate to Mitigate (I2M) project empowers teachers to employ a problem-based learning approach to incorporate climate change education in their classrooms. Teachers, regardless of whether they teach language arts, science, engineering, or math, work with students to identify potential causes of climate change and to develop a prototype as a potential solution. Collaborative student teams, utilizing the various strengths and interests that they bring from diverse backgrounds, design and develop their projects and finally create a competition pitch. I2M provides a structure for teaching climate change throughout the school year, supports students to discuss their developing mitigation ideas with peers across the nation, and provides an outside incentive for them to work towards an end goal. We propose a mini-simulation of the competition experience where teachers, acting as students, participate in the sensemaking promoted by the competition. Teachers read a short article about an aspect of climate change, brainstorm in small groups to propose a solution that mitigates the problem, and discuss mitigation ideas with other workshop attendees. Facilitators present ideas for collaboration among their students and across the hall with other teachers, identify key NGSS integration opportunities, provide examples of student projects, and help teachers think about integrating such a project into their own classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn how to identify entry points for climate change education that capitalize on student desires to make a difference about climate change, support collaboration, and incorporate three-dimensional sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Santiago Gasca (TERC: Cambridge, MA), Natalie Stapert (Master Reading Coordinator: Potomac, MD)

Science in Action: Updating the Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project Educators’ Guide

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W181a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Guide to NOAAs MDMAP for Educators (DRAFT ONLY)
Presentation Slides

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Marine debris is a widespread pollution problem in our ocean and waterways. It can harm wildlife, habitats, and our economy. This issue is human-caused, but it also has human solutions. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Debris Program is dedicated to better understanding and preventing marine debris and its impacts on our environment. One of the best tools we have to combat marine debris is understanding the distribution, abundance, and types of debris in the marine environment. The Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project (MDMAP) is a NOAA citizen science initiative to survey and record marine debris on shorelines. By participating in the MDMAP, students can generate critical data on marine debris for use by community organizations, policymakers, researchers, and NOAA. MDMAP data can also support student-generated action projects, providing opportunities to plan and implement authentic changemaking efforts. The NOAA Marine Debris Program plans to demonstrate and solicit feedback on an updated tool to support implementation of the MDMAP protocols with students: The MDMAP Educators’ Guide (Guide). We will introduce the updated protocols, provide a demonstration of activities in the Guide, and engage in a discussion with educators about implementation, suggested extensions (including action projects), and feedback.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees at this session will learn about the updated Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project Educators’ Guide: a refreshed citizen science tool for monitoring shoreline marine debris available from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, including planning and conducting protocols with students, working with survey data, and creating authentic, meaningful action projects for students based on their experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Alexandria Brake (NOAA Office of Education: Silver Spring, MD), Tanya Kea-Marie Torres (California Sea Grant Marine Debris Extension Fellow: , CA)

Putting the A into STEM

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The main goal of this presentation is to help teachers enhance curriculum choices that enrich students lives by integrating the visual arts with environmental science and conservation concerns that allow students to make real world global connections. Leonardo DiVinici is best know for painting the Mona Lisa, but did you know that he also kept nearly 13,000 pages of notes that fuse together art, nature and the physical universe? This professional development session will be centered around how you can incroporate conservation education practices as well as different art techniques into your science lessons that will engage all students.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will take away easy art techniques that can be incorporated in science lessons as well has how to add conservation education into their curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
Jackie Halsey (Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium: Omaha, NE)

Uncovering Student Misconceptions About Mathematical Models

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W194a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Uncovering Student Misconceptions About Mathematical Models (1).pdf

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Students come into a science classroom with varying or little to no background knowledge. Mathematical modeling in the science classroom is a critical piece of any three-dimensional lesson. Come learn how one science teacher uses real-world student-collected data to make modeling fun and inclusive of all students!

TAKEAWAYS:
Equity in the science/math classroom; data collection and analysis; and mathematical modeling.

SPEAKERS:
Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Solving Environmental Issues Through Civic Action, Invention and Primary Sources

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W194a


Show Details

Identifying problems, and complaining about them, is a talent many might claim. Identifying a problem and creating a solution is much less common but remains a core scientific principle needed to help students change the world. Finding a solution, however, is not enough; there must be an implementation plan as well. Scientific literacy teaches students to pinpoint and explore problems, but they must also take civic action--beginning in their own backyards. This session will introduce primary source-based inquiry learning tools by PBS NewsHour Classroom and Indiana University’s Center on Representative Government to help teachers meet this need. The workshop will consist of two NGSS-aligned activities on the connection between the environment and civic action.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to engage students in identifying environmental phenomena in their own backyards and how to take action to address it.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Osborn (Indiana University Bloomington: Bloomington, IN), Victoria Pasquantonio (PBS NewsHour: Arlington, VA)

The Egg Drop Meets 2020

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Participants will design and test a vessel that will land an egg dropped from a substantial heights without breaking the egg. Participants will use a variety of materials to provide the softest landing possible. Participants will employ technology to assist them in designing their vessels and shape their final methods.

TAKEAWAYS:
Design and test an egg vessel with real time data. Analyze live data to better design a successful egg drop vessel. Experience the engineering design process. - Using technology to test prototypes. -employing the engineering design process. -applying modern technology to past challenges.

SPEAKERS:
Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY), Todd Graba (Crystal Lake South High School: Crystal Lake, IL)

3-D Learning for a Sustainable World

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W196a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Three-dimensional learning, as outlined by NGSS, allows students to view science as an interrelated world of inquiry. Today’s environmental challenges require a 3-D approach to understand the phenomena and data and how our landscapes and ecosystems have changed as human population has doubled in the past 50 years. In this hands-on session, the presenter will lead participants in hands-on activities (problem-solving challenges, simulations and modeling) that use real-world data sets and 3-D learning in a variety of formats to analyze and think critically about some of the key ecological topics in Biology and Environmental Science courses (including AP) – population trends, climate change, land use, biodiversity, and ecosystem health. Presented activities emphasize students’ ability to collect, analyze and interpret data as central to developing and using models, identifying patterns and designing solutions. The presenter will also share interactive digital tools for engaging students remotely. The presenter will discuss how to implement these activities as part of broadening students’ understanding of the NGSS topics “Human Sustainability” and “Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems. Participants will receive lesson plans (including assessment ideas) and background materials in an electronic format.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will come away with cross-disciplinary ideas to incorporate 3-D learning strategies into hands-on activities around the NGSS topic of Human Sustainability.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Ruder (J.I. Case High School: Racine, WI)

Modeling Investigation of How Quarks Obtain Mass Through the Interaction of the Higgs Boson

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Each attendee will receive materials and instructions to construct a Higgs Boson. Dice and investigative procedure are included to determine the mass of six quarks.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. How to take an abstract concept and create concrete hands-on investigations; 2. Suggestions to go from teacher-centered to a student centered-curriculum; and 3. The importance of looking for trends, patterns, and regularities for modeling.

SPEAKERS:
Gary Schiltz (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Naperville, IL)

The Quantitative and Qualitative Modeling of the Doppler Effect

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The first 50 attendees will be be given the materials (circluar rings, rulers, and paper) to model the Doppler effect. Attendees will need a calculator for the quantitative portion of the workshop.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. How to take an abstract concept and create a concrete hands-on investigation; 2. Suggestions to go from teacher-centered to a student centered-curriculum; and 3. The importance of looking for trends, patterns, and regularities for modeling.

SPEAKERS:
Gary Schiltz (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Naperville, IL)

Crash Science Inquiry: Investigating Distracted Driving Dangers

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Complete a distracted driving simulation and discover free award-winning videos, STEM activities, and real-world applications exploring science, engineering, and vehicle crashworthiness. Free lesson plans included.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how scientific and engineering principles can be modeled in classrooms using crash science–related videos and activities to promote safer personal behaviors when riding in or driving a vehicle.

SPEAKERS:
Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

Nourish the Future: Energy and Biofuels

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Nourish the Future Energy Biofuels slide deck
Nourish the Future Fermentation Factories Student Lesson
Nourish the Future Fermentation Factories Teacher Document

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Students utilize different components (enzymes, yeast, feed stocks, and water) to produce ethanol and carbon dioxide through the process of fermentation. Students will develop a model of fermentation and explain how ethanol is made to answer the focus question "How can fermentation produce a renewable fuel source?" Students will develop experimental models to generate data in order to construct explanations about the relationships between the components of the fermentation process and to predict how those relationships can be manipulated to produce carbon dioxide. Students will design solutions to make the fermentation process as efficient as possible and generate the maximum amount of ethanol in a small bag environment Attendees will participate in hands-on activities centered around biofuel. Participants are going to prepare and compare different amounts of fermentation occurring in four different mixtures which will allow observations of production rates. A second activity focuses on a way to make a qualitative or quantitative explanation regarding the relationship between feed stock and glucose availability for ethanol production. Participants will deconstruct a model of starch to examine enzyme and starch reactions to determine how starches change into smaller molecules. Three additional hands-on activities that can be included in your classroom curriculum will be discussed.

TAKEAWAYS:
Nourish the Future is a national education initiative developed by science teachers for science teachers to connect students to modern agriculture and provide sound science based resources that meet teacher and student needs in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Tiska Rodgers (Clarkton High School: Clarkton, MO), Leanne Thele (Perryville High School: , MO)

Transformative Science Education: Enrich Your Students’ Lives with Science

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W193a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Unfortunately, the Las Vegas slogan “What Happens Here Stays Here” applies all too well to science classrooms. Science learning that takes place in the classroom often stays in the classroom and fails to transform students’ perceiving and experiencing of the world. This gap between school learning and everyday experience is one of the key barriers to developing active scientific literacy. This workshop on the Teaching for Transformative Experiences in Science (TTES) model will help teachers address this problem by enacting transformative teaching. The TTES model is a research-based pedagogy for fostering transformative experiences; that is, experiences in which students use science content to enrich and expand their everyday lives. The workshop will train teachers in the application of three core design principles: (a) artistic selection and crafting of content, (b) experiential apprenticeship, and (c) doing and undergoing. The workshop will be conducted by one of the pioneers and lead researchers of transformative experience theory. It will include authentic classroom vignettes illustrating the design principles in action, application templates and guidelines, and exercises that will help participants master the design principles. The workshop is appropriate for science educators at all levels as the design principles are adaptable to all ages.

TAKEAWAYS:
Workshop participants will receive hands-on training in research-based strategies effective at fostering transformative experiences; that is, experiences in which students use their in-school learning to enrich and expand their everyday, out-of-school lives.

SPEAKERS:
Kevin Pugh (University of Northern Colorado: Greeley, CO)

Inclusivity through Evidence in High School Physics Courses

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

What is it about how students engage with physics that perpetuates inequities in physics courses and in the field of physics more broadly? In this interactive workshop, participants will consider tents of inclusive physics instruction and contribute to a broader conversation about power structures and pedagogy that facilitate inclusivity. By analyzing videos of students working in a learning environment where they engage in science practices as a way of inducing physics principles (in alignment with the three dimensions of the Next Generation Science Standards), participants will consider how both the structure of the lessons and teacher moves can cultivate more equitable environments. We suggest that this learning environment disrupts traditional power structures that exist in classrooms, enhancing students’ voice both in authoring ideas and sanctioning ideas. Participants will consider what counts as success in a physics class and when and how people are recognized and rewarded. In the workshop, I’ll share discussion protocols and some of the student-facing physics lessons I’ve used that support this work.

TAKEAWAYS:
How can student-collected evidence and consensus building serve to make high school physics courses equitable and inclusive?

SPEAKERS:
Shelly Belleau (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

How to create a simple bioinformatics activity that connects to your current science curricula.

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W193b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Bringing bioinformatics into the science classroom.pdf
Electronic version of the worksheet used during the Workshop Session
How to Create a Simple Bioinformatics Activity - NSTA Chicago 22.pdf
Presentation Slides for the Workshop Session on Creating a Simple Bioinformatics Acitivity

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Advances in biotechnology, particularly DNA sequencing, has led to a surge in genetic data and large online databases. Interpreting these data, using the interdisciplinary field of bioinformatics, is in high demand because genome sequencing is becoming increasingly cheaper and faster. In science classrooms, there are many opportunities to incorporate bioinformatics, but this can be a daunting task for teachers who do not know where to begin. This hands-on activity starts by introducing participants to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) website. Presenters will provide a brief overview of the database to guide participants on: 1) how to use the search functions of the database, 2) interpret information on sequence pages, and 3) how to download DNA, RNA or amino acid sequences. Following the guided tour, small groups will be provided discussion questions to discover potential areas within their curricula that could be reinforced or enhanced with a brief bioinformatics activity. Participants will be provided worksheets to help document relevant sequence information (accession numbers) for the biological phenomenon or topic that inspired the activity. The participants will leave with a basic understanding of sequence capture from NCBI and a rudimentary activity to expose students to sequence data analysis.

TAKEAWAYS:
An understanding of the genetic code and basic internet browsing skills are all that are needed to explore bioinformatics and use them in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Zack Bateson (National Agricultural Genotyping Center: Fargo, ND), Jane Hunt (Nourish the Future - Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

A Unique and Challenging Ice Core Investigation that Integrates the Three Dimensions of NGSS & STEM

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
A JS9 Image Analysis Analysis Investigation
This JS9 investigation is an excellent extension for the Ice Core Activity to help determine the date of the Cas A supernova event.
Ice Core Records Investigation Student Handout
Ice Core Records Presentation
Ice Core Records.pdf
Ice Core Webinar for Educators
Jamboard Online Version of Ice Core Records
This version makes it easier for groups to work together individually and in a group to share their progress.
The Ice Core Records Investigation from the Earth Scientist Magazine
This article provides an overview of the Ice Core Materials for Educators.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

The GISP2 H-Core was collected in 1992 adjacent to the Greenland Ice Sheet Project Two (GISP2) drill site. The GISP2-H 125.6-meter firm and ice core is a record of 430 years of liquid electrical conductivity and nitrate concentrations. The liquid electrical conductivity sequence contains signals from a number of known volcanic eruptions that provide a dating system at specific locations along the core. The terrestrial and solar background nitrate records show seasonal and annual variations – as well as unique events. Several major nitrate anomalies within the record do not correspond to any known terrestrial or solar events, and there is compelling evidence that some nitrate anomalies within the GISP2 H-Core could possibly be a record of supernova events. This investigation provides participants with a better understanding of the scientific process of analyzing data and developing models to construct knowledge, and defending the results. Sometimes there is no answer key, only possible solutions from analyzing and constructing knowledge from multiple sources that cross traditional disciplines. The materials focus on NGSS scientific practices, crosscutting concepts and the Earth and space sciences core disciplinary ideas – including analyzing and interpreting data, patterns, cycles of energy and matter, Earth systems and Earth and human activity.

TAKEAWAYS:
In constructing new knowledge, sometimes there is no definitive answer, only plausible conclusions based on constructing, analyzing, and comparing data and research from multiple disciplines.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Young (NASA/NSO/UoL Program Manager: Laughlin, NV)

Alexa for Astronauts: Bring Space and Voice Artificial Intelligence to Life Science This Year!

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://my.nsta.org/collection/sCD3GL620v4_E

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session will introduce participants to the Alexa for Astronauts: Using AI to Monitor Health lesson set. We will explore how the instructional sequence exposes high school students to ideas about artificial intelligence (AI) and computer programming, using Amazon Alexa and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) App Inventor, while applying previously built life science ideas to begin to address the problem of monitoring astronauts’ physical health. Participants will gain experience using the Alexa-MIT App Inventor to program custom Alexa skills and learn how to sign up for access to the instructional materials. No accounts needed; bring a laptop or device to access the Alexa-MIT App Inventor.

TAKEAWAYS:
The Alexa-MIT App Inventor platform and teacher supports found in the lesson plans make it possible to incorporate computer science and artificial intelligence ideas in Biology class.

SPEAKERS:
Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Garrett Dorfman (Amazon Future Engineer: Nashville, TN), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Energize Your Climate Change Course for High School

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

How and why has Earth’s climate changed over time? How do we collect data about Earth’s natural history? How do Earth’s orbital variations affect climate? What role does phytoplankton play in the Carbon Cycle? These are all questions that are answered by exploring a series of hands-on activities that are NGSS aligned. Activities include: eccentricity, obliquity, precession, carbon and plants, the effect of carbon dioxide on temperature, ocean acidification, and more. The climate change curriculum, from the eesmarts K-12 curriculum, an energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy learning initiative funded by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, is made up of adapted lessons surrounding natural cycles that occur on Earth and how humans may affect natural cycles. Activities examine evidence from the past through proxies such as forams and ice core data. Additional topics include sea-level rise and vulnerability, the impact of single use plastics, and how the effect of human activity can be minimized. The lessons are written in the 5-E Instructional Model (Engage - Explore - Explain - Elaborate - Evaluate) and include teacher-presentation Google Slides and student handouts. Select digital resources will be provided to participants. The complete eesmarts program is free and available to all Connecticut educators.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore activities that demonstrate how and why Earth’s climate has changed over time.

SPEAKERS:
Karin Jakubowski (eesmarts: No City, No State), Kathleen Brooks (CREC: No City, No State)

Designing Escape Boxes

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

Going Beneath the Surface: Using socioscientific issues to help students engage in 3D learning.

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W185a


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Socioscientific issues are scientific topics that require students to engage in meaningful discussions (Zeidler & Nichols, 2009). Additionally, engaging students in socioscientific issues can promote equity, diversity, and help students question biases (Goldsmith et al., 2021). Importantly, these issues are often most likely to promote inclusivity if students have a connection with them. Considering we live in the Midwest, we often use socioscientific issues surrounding agricultural practices. We start with a phenomenon that introduces the example socioscientific issue by showing a video about tilling. We then ask, “Should farmers till the land?” To explore this question, we engage participants by jigsawing four different hands-on activities related to the soil. Participants will explore compact vs. loose soil, reducing water erosion, reducing erosion caused by wind and snow, and the effect of a heat lamp on the temperature of soil. Participants will use science and engineering practices such as planning and carrying out investigations and analyzing and interpreting data. We will debrief the activities and model how we help students make sense of the science ideas. We will finish the presentation by discussing how to find suitable socioscientific issues, include culturally responsive teaching practices, and provide some strategies for integrating with the NGSS.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about how to use socioscientific issues and culturally responsive practices to engage students with social issues that require scientific knowledge.

SPEAKERS:
Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Back to Top