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2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 13 results

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Supporting Civically Engaged Argument Writing in Science and Technology Classrooms

McCormick Place - W178b

Participants will use a graphic organizer to record their thinking as I describe a unit I taught in which students in grades 9-12 explored issues related to artificial intelligence. Students crafted op-Eds advocating for what we should do in our community about emerging technologies like driverless cars and facial recognition. As I describe the unit, I will highlight how I (1) kicked off the unit with a phenomenon that raised questions about convenience, safety, security, equity, and justice; (2) layered on texts and encouraged students to grapple with multiple perspectives on AI-related issues; (3) used routines and mentor texts to support students in crafting claims and connecting evidence to their claims; and (4) engaged students in processes of revision. Then, participants will work in self-selected groups to explore science/technology/society text sets on topics like lab grown meat and space debris. As they explore the text set, they will engage with a classroom routine to develop a compelling, debatable, defensible, and nuanced claim. Participants will share what they discovered as they explored the text set and wrote claims in their group and will reflect on how these text sets and routines might become part of their classroom practice.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about freely available text sets and classroom routines developed by teachers for supporting civically engaged argument writing about science and technology issues in society.

Speakers

John Smith (Chester A Arthur School: Philadelphia, PA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Guided Session Notes and Resources

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Matter and Energy Learning Progressions in OpenSciEd High School Chemistry

McCormick Place - W196c

The forthcoming OpenSciEd High School chemistry course combines physical science and Earth and space science NGSS performance expectations as a way to engage students in developing understandings around energy and matter. Learn about the focus of the five units that make up this course and their associated performance expectation bundles to see how the three dimensions are used as a way to authentically engage students in making sense of both physical science and earth and space science related phenomena and design solutions. In the session, we will highlight how anchoring phenomena of the first unit, typically associated with earth and space science, helps students make sense of the particulate nature of matter, energy transfers in earth systems, feedback loops, and human interactions with their environment. An in-depth examination of the performance expectation bundles for the following four units will help illustrate the learning progressions students will follow to develop progressively more complex models of the particle nature of matter, its properties, and its interactions using the lenses of all crosscutting concepts, in particular, patterns, energy and matter, structure and function, and stability and change.

Takeaways: Incorporation of earth and space science NGSS performance expectations within a chemistry curriculum supports student engagement in and sensemaking of chemistry concepts around properties and interactions of matter and energy.

Speakers

Nicole Vick (Northwestern University: No City, No State), Dan Voss (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Tara McGill (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Chicago 2022 Chemistry Progressions.pdf

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

McCormick Place - W185d

Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

Takeaways: Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

Speakers

Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Installation Science Exhibits as Assessment Options

McCormick Place - W187c

To help develop more scientifically curious and literate students, we use scientific literature or documentaries to engage students in developing the NGSS science practices. Students find an interesting topic, generate a question, collect and analyze data and then develop a Science Installation that communicates their learning to the greater community. Our most recent class project had students study how to grow food in a simulated Mars environment with the conditions controlled by student programmed raspberry pis. High school students organized 6th graders to do hands on data collection. They created a 10x12 foot exhibit that looked like a Martian landscape and highlighted the equipment they used with the plants still growing. The display included QR codes to communicate data and research using student-created videos, infographics, and data tables. Other installations include a monochromatic yellow room where everything looks grey and allowed observers to learn about the properties of light and the ways light energy is used in photosynthesis, the way it can be used to promote electrons, and the way it produces color. Other exhibits include sound waves and a history or music and musical instruments, the chemistry of color, and an environmental study of our use of carbon.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to guide students in the reading of scientific literature or the watching of documentaries in order to generate an authentic question and project. (How can we develop the capacity to farm on Mars? How does yellow monochromatic light produce the absence of color (an episode of Abstract, What can we learn about pollen structure from 3D printed files from Bayer’s agricultural division?) Participants will review a process to take the question and generate an authentic study that transcends a single class, grade, or discipline. (Students in 11th grade worked with students in 6th grade to test growing plants under controlled conditions that simulated Mars. Students in art and physics classes explored the properties of light and created a light-based art exhibit with science lessons on QR codes) Participants will explore a template for guiding students through the creation of an installation/exhibit that creatively shows the question, their experiment, their analysis, and potential solutions or conclusions in a creative and community-informing way. The exhibit is similar to an art installation with QR codes and experiment/study artifacts presented in a museum like scenario.

Speakers

Elizabeth Helfant (Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School: Saint Louis, MO)

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Data and Storylines: The key to helping all students become STEM literate

McCormick Place - W176c

News bulletins on social media and news sites contain topics that students need to understand now so that they can make informed decisions for their world today and tomorrow. STEM literacy is crucial to learners struggling to understand the multitude of information bombarding them through television, social media and the internet. Students in K-12 must become STEM literate so that they can identify, understand and solve problems in the world around them. STEM Literacy promotes innovative thinking and creativity as well as collaboration, problem solving, and most importantly, critical thinking. Today’s challenges need answers from our students but first they need to understand issues including climate change, space travel, robotics. By using real-world applications of scientific data and storylines, students become critical consumers, problem-solvers, and change-makers. Students who are STEM literate will be able to think critically and act responsibly about issues that impact them. In this session, lessons and strategies will be shared with teachers to inspire and to support their students as they develop STEM literacy skills. These lessons will encourage students to explore, explain and develop solutions to real phenomena and solve real problems.

Takeaways: Three Takeaways: 1) Teachers will become familiar with technology, literacy and adaptive learning for middle school and high school students. 2) Teachers will be introduced to the free materials available that align with NGSS standards. 3) Teachers will be given ideas on how to incorporate these lessons in class

Speakers

Diane Ripollone (Cardinal Gibbons High School: Raleigh, NC), Kathy Biernat (Educational Consultant: Franklin, WI)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Data and Storylines
Resources for Teachers
Resource Folder
Resource Folder

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Studying the Wright Brothers and Testing Airfoils: Bringing STEM into the History Classroom

McCormick Place - W184a

As a high school Engineering teacher, I'm passionate about the effects project-based learning can have on students' ability to engage with classroom material. I don't believe that hands-on STEM work needs to be limited to the science classroom and want to share a project that has been done in a freshman History class and could be adapted to incorporate other topics. Using online 3D modeling software, a 3D printer, and a wind generator, students studying the Wright brothers drew their own historically significant airfoils (like The Spirit of St. Louis and the Enola Gay), 3D printed them, and tested them. Students learned airfoil terminology, like camber and chord, and used airfoil ratios to create their scale models. While testing, we discussed the variations of the wings and why engineers might value payload capacity over speed based on the plane's use. My hope is that this presentation can encourage teachers to bring STEM concepts into other curricular departments as a way to demonstrate the types of connections students can make when they're working hands-on. This presentation will detail the steps of the project, materials needed, and highlight the challenges and lessons we've learned over the four years we've run this unit.

Takeaways: Attendees will see an example of how a STEM teacher brought project based learning into a freshman History class and how that project has evolved and expanded over four years. We will present the curriculum and materials needed for this week-long project for others to employ at their own schools.

Speakers

Abigail Mills (Woodberry Forest School: Woodberry Forest, VA)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Photovoltaic Array Use in Earth Science Classes

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 3

Teacher describes installation of two solar arrays, and how students use the arrays to investigate alternative energy and effect of array angle on electricity production.

Takeaways: Solar arrays allow students to interact with a real world technology changing sunlight into usable electricity. Two solar arrays that tilt independently allow students to evaluate data from a controlled experiment. Solar energy is part of response our society needs to respond to the challenge of global warming and our need for energy.

Speakers

Bruce Rose (Greenbrier East High School: Lewisburg, WV)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

GEHS Solar Website
This is a website with teaching materials related to two solar arrays installed at Greenbrier East High School to aid in teaching Earth Science classes.

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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STEM + Empathy in Use in the Design of an Improved Bionic Arm

McCormick Place - W185d

Empathic engineering design can help develop students’ cultural competence as well as inform the design of more useful innovations for people with limb differences.

Takeaways: School-based activities that are oriented toward improving community members’ lives can simultaneously support the development of students’ cultural competence and integrated STEM literacy.

Speakers

Susan Meabh Kelly (University of Connecticut: Storrs Mansfield, CT), Brittany Klimowicz (NYC iSchool: New York, NY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Slides
Session slides with links to all resources and contact information

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Science Education in an Age of Misinformation

McCormick Place - W184d

We are living in an Age of Misinformation. Developing the capabilities to evaluate scientific information is a key goal of scientific literacy. Moreover, “obtaining, evaluating and communicating information” is a core practice of NGSS. The NGSS standards, however, were developed a decade ago before misinformation became so pervasive and were not developed to address this threat. Much of this misinformation is scientific. Therefore, this session will present a set of ideas and materials about how to address this challenge. These have emerged from a report developed at Stanford University drawing on the expertise of an international group of science educators, scientists and psychologists entitled “Science Education in an Age of Misinformation”. In this session, we will present the main arguments and recommendations of the report. Using a set of practical, web-based classroom examples, participants will work in small groups to trial and discuss the suggested teaching approaches and materials we have developed. Opportunities will be provided for feedback, questions and discussion in a final plenary. What we will present will empower teachers of science with ways they can support their students to avoid being misled by the purveyors of misinformation.

Takeaways: Participants will learn what are the challenges posed by misinformation and what they can do to help science education address this challenge using practical examples of exercises and ionnovative teaching materials.

Speakers

Daniel Pimentel (Stanford University: Stanford, CA)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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Lights-Camera-CRASH: Exploring Crash Science with Griff Jones and the IIHS’s Vehicle Research Center

McCormick Place - W180

Go behind the scenes of a crash-test center and use award-winning videos, paper car crashes, and egg drop cushions to teach motion and energy. Everything free at classroom.iihs.org.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how to use inquiry-based, NGSS-focused activities and video-supported engineering design experiences integrating STEM concepts with vehicle crashworthiness and crash avoidance technologies to promote students' safer decision-making when riding in or driving a vehicle.

Speakers

Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Crash Science Inquiry: Investigating Distracted Driving Dangers

McCormick Place - W181a

Complete a distracted driving simulation and discover free award-winning videos, STEM activities, and real-world applications exploring science, engineering, and vehicle crashworthiness. Free lesson plans included.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how scientific and engineering principles can be modeled in classrooms using crash science–related videos and activities to promote safer personal behaviors when riding in or driving a vehicle.

Speakers

Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Maker-Centered Learning in the Early Years

McCormick Place - W175c

Research shows many benefits of a maker-centered learning environment, however many teachers do not consider their classroom “maker classrooms” In this hands-on workshop, participants will see many different categories of making in an early years class, which allows participants to begin to reframe their view of their own classes. Through hands-on activities, participants experience a range of maker-centered learning activities which showcases how these activities can be used to develop problem solving and sensemaking for students, with built in modifications support MLL and students with special rights. Literacy development and formative assessments are also continuous threads in maker-centered learning as students learn and use language in the making process. Through observation and discussion of maker-made artifacts, and the processes leading to these artifacts, teachers can assess student understanding Furthermore, with many maker-centered activities, family and community connections are strengthened as students observe their own community, ask questions, and involve others outside of school in their making activities. Conference activities will be limited to portable, lightweight materials, with discussions and examples of different materials in action

Takeaways: 1) Discover new making opportunities to support sensemaking in your class while developing student skills in communication, collaboration as well as identifying and solving problems 2) Identify ways of integrating maker centered opportunities in your class planning, with specific attention to the early years 3) Observe different ways of bringing family’s funds of knowledge into a maker centered classroom

Speakers

Anne Lowry (Aleph Academy: Reno, NV)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Resources for Maker Centered Learning in the Early Years.docx
Maker Centered Learning screen 072322.pptx

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Using CERs and CEJs to Develop Student Discourse and Discussion

McCormick Place - W176a

Come learn how to teach in three dimensions and advance students’ scientific literacy by strategically applying the use of CERs and CEJs in your classroom.

Takeaways: After this session, participants will be able to identify opportunities for using CERs and CEJs to facilitate student discourse and discussion and apply what they have learned to their own classroom.

Speakers

McKenna Serowka (Lake Zurich High School: Lake Zurich, IL)