OpenSciEd - Carolina (P-U from March)
 

2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 16 results

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Increasing Scientific Literacy: Strategies, Free Activities, and Resources That Work!

McCormick Place - W178a

Participants will learn strategies and receive numerous resources that increase students’ scientific literacy. The hands-on approach has participants engaged in the activities, games, and more.

Takeaways: Attendees will: 1. learn new strategies for incorporating scientific literacy into their lessons; and 2. receive numerous activities, templates, games, and other resources to help with doing this. These resources can be used “as is” or modified to allow for differentiation based on the needs of the learners. Strategies and resources will include ones effective with ELL and EC students.

Speakers

Iris Mudd (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools: Winston Salem, NC)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Strategies to Elevate Students Scientific Literacy with Real-World Data

McCormick Place - W181b

Science literacy is essential to be informed and engaged citizens in the 21st century. Data are what we use to do science. Thus, reading and making sense of real-world data are fundamental skills to being scientifically literate and a fun way to engage learners with science. However, how do we incorporate data into K-8 science without feeling overburdened with yet another thing to teach? By integrating it into what we are already doing! Join us to explore the connections between data, science, and literacy. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. The goal is to increase our data toolkit of strategies and resources to increase science literacy and relevance for students. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better helps students do and communicate science. Working with and learning from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ literacy skills. Let’s set our students up for success now and in the future!

Takeaways: Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into K-8 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

Speakers

Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, Rutgers University: Princeton, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document of links and the slide deck from the workshop.

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Changing Climate and Food Production - How can we sequester carbon and feed our growing population?

McCormick Place - W176c

How can a change in human action impact carbon sequestration, biodiversity and soil health? In this hands-on investigation teachers will look for patterns in ecosystem diversity to determine cause and effect relationships for the services provided for by those ecosystems. We will capture mesofauna and calculate its species richness and relative abundance using Simpson’s Index of Diversity. Then, we will investigate soil structure to compare the species diversity to soil health. Is there a connection? How can improved soil health help to mitigate climate change? This investigation will spotlight how human impact has altered natural ecosystem services and discuss how this change has reduced carbon sequestration. How can we use symbiotic relationships and biogeochemical cycles to reverse this trend? Teachers will: - Investigate soil ecosystems - Calculate Simpson’s Index of Diversity - Determine cause and effect relationships between human impact and ecosystem services - Use foldscopes to identify organisms and collect data - Talk to industry experts in food production to connect science and technology to their classrooms. Free professional development and curriculum available from Nourishthefuture.org.

Takeaways: Investigate patterns in biodiversity, soil health, and carbon sequestration to determine human impact on ecosystem services and changing climate.

Speakers

Heather Bryan (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Changing Climate and Food Production Slide Deck
Mesofauna Teacher Document
Mesofauna Student Lesson
Mesofauna samples

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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How Did the Elk Cross the Road?

McCormick Place - W178b

By the end of this session, participants will be able to: - Explain the impact of roads on wildlife - Analyze data to design wildlife-friendly crossing structures - Use hands-on tools to teach STEM concepts The majority of this session will focus on real world data analysis and problem solving. Working in small groups, participants will propose solutions to a number of related scenarios. First, they’ll analyze data to determine if highways pose a significant threat to wildlife. Relevant vocabulary will be introduced – including fragmentation, migratory barriers, porosity and passage rates – as we explore the need for ways to move animals across highways without impacting humans. Once a need is determined, they’ll continue their exploration by looking at potential crossing structure solutions. They’ll identify structure location and wildlife-friendly designs to ensure the highest use. They’ll be asked to either create a model or blueprint of their design. Finally, participants will discuss ways to determine the crossing structure effectiveness. This will include a cost/benefit analysis. Additional resources to expand learning will be shared, including links, books, videos, contacts and professional development.

Takeaways: Science and Engineering Practices are used by wildlife biologists to help manage wildlife populations and those same skills can be developed in students.

Speakers

Eric Proctor (Arizona Game and Fish Department: Phoenix, AZ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Slide Deck
Notes Handout
Elk Crossing Graph
Highway Map Crossing Locations
Crossing Structure Videos
AZGFD K-12 Education Resources (Focus Wild)
How did the Elk Cross the Road
program

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Half-Earth Project Inclusive Mapping Design Challenge and Hummingbird Guided Inquiry

McCormick Place - W196a

The Half-Earth Project team-based Mapping Design Challenge engages students in authentic teamwork to use digital mapping to design their own biodiversity conservation choices.

Takeaways: Digital mapping motivated by exploring charismatic species draws diverse students into the multidisciplinary science of conservation decision-making where species, human impacts, and stakeholders have to be considered.

Speakers

Dennis Liu (E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation: Durham, NC)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

McCormick Place - W185d

Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

Takeaways: Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

Speakers

Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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GMOs what do you know breakout

McCormick Place - W195

Participants will organize in groups and receive clues and puzzles to learn about genetic modification then be tasked to “break out” unlocking BreakoutEDU boxes. Puzzles include myths and facts; GMO or not?; Misleading label; and general terms related to genetics, and recombinant DNA. This activity could be used as review of genetics concepts or as a way to engage learners in research about genetically modified organisms. Free curriculum is available from grownextgen.org.

Takeaways: Dispelling many of the myths about genetically engineered crops. An engaging way to involve every student in the process of problem-solving. Introduction to more resources about the connection between agriculture and science concepts.

Speakers

Jane Hunt (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Teaching Grey Water Reuse and Water Recycling

McCormick Place - W181a

Water: It’s constantly in use all around us, but did you know that you can recycle water just like paper or plastic? Droughts and water scarcity are becoming an increasingly common phenomenon, and it is estimated that nearly 6 billion people will suffer from clean water scarcity by 2050. Yet, every year, Americans throw 11 trillion gallons of reusable water, also known as grey water, down the drain. In this series of lessons, students will learn about where their water comes from, the human water cycle, the three types of water and the connection between droughts and climate change. These lessons will also tie into the broader themes of sustainability and climate science and incorporate hands-on STEM activities and career connections. The lessons are primarily for elementary students but can be adapted for older audiences. They will be free for all teachers to use in their classrooms and are developed by Shreya Ramachandran, founder of The Grey Water Project in concert with educators. Join us for the presentation to learn more about grey water, why teaching about grey water and water conservation is important and how you can bring this to your classroom!

Takeaways: Session participants will learn about grey water reuse and water recycling and how they can be effective drought solutions.

Speakers

Shreya Ramachandran (Stanford University: Stanford, CA)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Science in Action: Updating the Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project Educators’ Guide

McCormick Place - W181a

Marine debris is a widespread pollution problem in our ocean and waterways. It can harm wildlife, habitats, and our economy. This issue is human-caused, but it also has human solutions. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Debris Program is dedicated to better understanding and preventing marine debris and its impacts on our environment. One of the best tools we have to combat marine debris is understanding the distribution, abundance, and types of debris in the marine environment. The Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project (MDMAP) is a NOAA citizen science initiative to survey and record marine debris on shorelines. By participating in the MDMAP, students can generate critical data on marine debris for use by community organizations, policymakers, researchers, and NOAA. MDMAP data can also support student-generated action projects, providing opportunities to plan and implement authentic changemaking efforts. The NOAA Marine Debris Program plans to demonstrate and solicit feedback on an updated tool to support implementation of the MDMAP protocols with students: The MDMAP Educators’ Guide (Guide). We will introduce the updated protocols, provide a demonstration of activities in the Guide, and engage in a discussion with educators about implementation, suggested extensions (including action projects), and feedback.

Takeaways: Attendees at this session will learn about the updated Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project Educators’ Guide: a refreshed citizen science tool for monitoring shoreline marine debris available from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, including planning and conducting protocols with students, working with survey data, and creating authentic, meaningful action projects for students based on their experiences.

Speakers

Alexandria Brake (NOAA Office of Education: Silver Spring, MD), Tanya Kea-Marie Torres (California Sea Grant Marine Debris Extension Fellow: , CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation Slides
Guide to NOAAs MDMAP for Educators (DRAFT ONLY)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Engage in teacher developed activities that will allow your students to experience

McCormick Place - W184d

In this session, the participants will explore some lessons developed by teachers in the National Space Biomedical Research Institute-Teacher Academy Project (NSBRI-TAP). These are interactive, physical and focus on spatial disorientation and the musculoskeletal system as affected by microgravity. The teachers will engage in the activities and collect sample data as they would with students and interpret the results. These are both educational and fun as we need to desperately restore enthusiasm for science studies. The presenter has anecdotal stories from many astronauts of their physiological reaction to microgravity conditions that he will share. Teachers will be provided lesson plans and worksheets for use with their students. Sample activities: Title: IN-FLIGHT EXERCISES Grade Level: 5-8 Content Area: Life Science and Health National Science Content Standards: Standard A. Science as Inquiry (Grades 5-8 & 9-12) • Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry • Understandings about scientific inquiry Standard C. Life Science (Grades 5-8) • Structure and function in living systems • Regulation and behavior Standard F. Science in Personal and Social Perspectives (Grades 5-8 & 9-12) • Personal health Title: SHIFTY EYES Grade Level: 5-8 Content Area: Space/Life Science National Science Content Standards: Unifying Concepts and Processes (Grades 5-8) Models Standard C. Life Science (Grades 5-8) Structure and function in living systems Regulation and behavior Diversity and adaptations of organisms Dr. Wilson also participated in two experiments on NASA’s KC-135 (Vomit Comet): 1) testing a resistance exercise machine to fly in space designed at The Cleveland Clinic and 2) an experiment where the corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea) was subjected to microgravity while a control group of worms was grown by elementary students in Las Cruces, NM. He will explain and share the results of these experiments and of one flown by teachers from Miami-Dade School District in Florida involved in his Future Scientists Program.

Takeaways: The International Space Station (ISS) is a research platform and is helping scientists develop countermeasures to the adverse effects of long-duration spaceflight on the human body.

Speakers

Craig Wilson (Texas A&M University: College Station, TX)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA2022teacherinfo.docx
background information and simple worksheets to collect data

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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How to create a simple bioinformatics activity that connects to your current science curricula.

McCormick Place - W193b

Advances in biotechnology, particularly DNA sequencing, has led to a surge in genetic data and large online databases. Interpreting these data, using the interdisciplinary field of bioinformatics, is in high demand because genome sequencing is becoming increasingly cheaper and faster. In science classrooms, there are many opportunities to incorporate bioinformatics, but this can be a daunting task for teachers who do not know where to begin. This hands-on activity starts by introducing participants to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) website. Presenters will provide a brief overview of the database to guide participants on: 1) how to use the search functions of the database, 2) interpret information on sequence pages, and 3) how to download DNA, RNA or amino acid sequences. Following the guided tour, small groups will be provided discussion questions to discover potential areas within their curricula that could be reinforced or enhanced with a brief bioinformatics activity. Participants will be provided worksheets to help document relevant sequence information (accession numbers) for the biological phenomenon or topic that inspired the activity. The participants will leave with a basic understanding of sequence capture from NCBI and a rudimentary activity to expose students to sequence data analysis.

Takeaways: An understanding of the genetic code and basic internet browsing skills are all that are needed to explore bioinformatics and use them in the classroom.

Speakers

Zack Bateson (National Agricultural Genotyping Center: Fargo, ND), Jane Hunt (Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

How to Create a Simple Bioinformatics Activity - NSTA Chicago 22.pdf
Presentation Slides for the Workshop Session on Creating a Simple Bioinformatics Acitivity
Bringing bioinformatics into the science classroom.pdf
Electronic version of the worksheet used during the Workshop Session

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Understanding the Importance of Climate Modeling

McCormick Place - W195

A scientific model represents the cause and effect relationships between components of a system attempting to replicate the system in such a way as to be predictive. Models are necessary when the studied system is too complex to isolate each component and test variables and their impact on the whole system. Climate is a highly complex system, but modeling allows climate scientists to identify the variables within the system and study each of them independently and as a system. The evolution of video game graphics and consoles mirrors the evolution of models used to replicate Earth’s climate. To support the understanding of NGSS HS-ESS2: Earth’s Systems and HS-ESS3: Earth and Human Activity, session participants will analyze data from different factors affecting climate and average global temperatures. Ultimately, data shows the rapid increase of greenhouse gases due to human activity. Additionally, participants will examine various climate models focusing on the factors included in building the model and communicate their findings by creating their model. The National Center for Science Education supports science teachers through free professional development and curriculum to recognize and address science misconceptions using the three dimensions of the NGSS. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

Takeaways: Scientists use models to understand highly complex systems and make predictions about future outcomes. Climate scientists use multiple data sources to design and test comprehensive climate models to examine past climates and predict future trends. Attendees will learn about the history and evolution of climate modeling while examining evidence that supports their reliability for predicting future climate patterns.

Speakers

Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), DeeDee Wright (Colorado State University: Fort Collins, CO), Cari Herndon (District of Columbia Public Schools: Washington, DC), Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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A Unique and Challenging Ice Core Investigation that Integrates the Three Dimensions of NGSS & STEM

McCormick Place - W176c

The GISP2 H-Core was collected in 1992 adjacent to the Greenland Ice Sheet Project Two (GISP2) drill site. The GISP2-H 125.6-meter firm and ice core is a record of 430 years of liquid electrical conductivity and nitrate concentrations. The liquid electrical conductivity sequence contains signals from a number of known volcanic eruptions that provide a dating system at specific locations along the core. The terrestrial and solar background nitrate records show seasonal and annual variations – as well as unique events. Several major nitrate anomalies within the record do not correspond to any known terrestrial or solar events, and there is compelling evidence that some nitrate anomalies within the GISP2 H-Core could possibly be a record of supernova events. This investigation provides participants with a better understanding of the scientific process of analyzing data and developing models to construct knowledge, and defending the results. Sometimes there is no answer key, only possible solutions from analyzing and constructing knowledge from multiple sources that cross traditional disciplines. The materials focus on NGSS scientific practices, crosscutting concepts and the Earth and space sciences core disciplinary ideas – including analyzing and interpreting data, patterns, cycles of energy and matter, Earth systems and Earth and human activity.

Takeaways: In constructing new knowledge, sometimes there is no definitive answer, only plausible conclusions based on constructing, analyzing, and comparing data and research from multiple disciplines.

Speakers

Donna Young (NASA/NSO/UoL Program Manager: Laughlin, NV)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Jamboard Online Version of Ice Core Records
This version makes it easier for groups to work together individually and in a group to share their progress.
Ice Core Records Presentation
Ice Core Records Investigation Student Handout
A JS9 Image Analysis Analysis Investigation
This JS9 investigation is an excellent extension for the Ice Core Activity to help determine the date of the Cas A supernova event.
Ice Core Webinar for Educators
The Ice Core Records Investigation from the Earth Scientist Magazine
This article provides an overview of the Ice Core Materials for Educators.
Ice Core Records.pdf

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Good is Good Enough? Linking the Evolution of Horses and Environmental Change

McCormick Place - W196a

Horses have an extraordinary fossil record in North America, with specimens from the early Eocene (about 55 Ma) to just the last 10,000 years. The primary dietary strategy in horses changed from browsing –- like that of a giraffe –-to grazing –- like that of modern horses, as seen in the evolution of the higher-crowned teeth. The evolution of tooth structure strongly correlates to variations in the ecosystem due to a changing climate. To support the understanding of NGSS HS-LS4 Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity, session participants will engage in the analysis of hypsodonty -- the height of the tooth relative to its overall size -- of fossil replicas to track the evolution of dietary strategy in this lineage to construct an explanation based on evidence to support the claim that changes in environmental conditions may result in the emergence of new species over time. Additionally, participants will communicate their newly gained knowledge in analyzing how horse evolution is depicted in museum displays and design an accurate phylogenetic representation. The National Center for Science Education supports science teachers through free professional development and curriculum to recognize and address science misconceptions using the three dimensions of the NGSS. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

Takeaways: Natural selection acts on genetic variation within populations as individuals who are adapted to survive in the environment reproduce and pass on their genes. Attendees will have the opportunity to work hands-on with a variety of 3D-printed horse teeth dating back to the Eocene to understand how a changing climate played a role in the dietary evolution of horses.

Speakers

Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), DeeDee Wright (Colorado State University: Fort Collins, CO), Cari Herndon (District of Columbia Public Schools: Washington, DC), Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Using CERs and CEJs to Develop Student Discourse and Discussion

McCormick Place - W176a

Come learn how to teach in three dimensions and advance students’ scientific literacy by strategically applying the use of CERs and CEJs in your classroom.

Takeaways: After this session, participants will be able to identify opportunities for using CERs and CEJs to facilitate student discourse and discussion and apply what they have learned to their own classroom.

Speakers

McKenna Serowka (Lake Zurich High School: Lake Zurich, IL)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Budburst Community Science: Observing Plants in a Changing World

McCormick Place - W176c

Budburst is a national community science project that brings together researchers, educators, gardeners, and community scientists to make careful observations of the timing of plant life cycle events, or phenophases. Changes over time can be used to illustrate how plants and ecosystems are being affected by human impacts on the environment, especially climate change. By joining Budburst, students can connect to nature wherever they live while participating in an authentic scientific investigation with real-world impacts. In this session educators will learn how they can use Budburst to engage their students in collecting and using real scientific data to examine local plant phenomena and address the NGSS. They will learn about the resources freely available to educators on the Budburst website, including tools allowing them to (1) create their own virtual classroom and set up student accounts, (2) collect and submit data with students, and (3) access existing data to help students ask and analyze their own questions about plants, ecosystems, and climate change. Finally, participants will learn how other educators have implemented Budburst in their classrooms and explore how they can use this flexible platform to scaffold their students’ participation in different stages of the scientific process.

Takeaways: Learn to engage students in local plant phenomena and real-world climate change science using Budburst resources.

Speakers

Sarah Jones (Chicago Botanic Garden: Glencoe, IL), Rebecca Ammann (Chicago Botanic Garden: Glencoe, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Budburst Overview for Educators
Using the Budburst Mobile App.pdf
Plants in A Changing World Presentation Slides