2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

Grade Level


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Pathway/Course

FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Presentation, Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom, General Science

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
4 results
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Data and Storylines: The key to helping all students become STEM literate

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Data and Storylines
Resources for Teachers
Resource Folder
Resource Folder

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

News bulletins on social media and news sites contain topics that students need to understand now so that they can make informed decisions for their world today and tomorrow. STEM literacy is crucial to learners struggling to understand the multitude of information bombarding them through television, social media and the internet. Students in K-12 must become STEM literate so that they can identify, understand and solve problems in the world around them. STEM Literacy promotes innovative thinking and creativity as well as collaboration, problem solving, and most importantly, critical thinking. Today’s challenges need answers from our students but first they need to understand issues including climate change, space travel, robotics. By using real-world applications of scientific data and storylines, students become critical consumers, problem-solvers, and change-makers. Students who are STEM literate will be able to think critically and act responsibly about issues that impact them. In this session, lessons and strategies will be shared with teachers to inspire and to support their students as they develop STEM literacy skills. These lessons will encourage students to explore, explain and develop solutions to real phenomena and solve real problems.

TAKEAWAYS:
Three Takeaways: 1) Teachers will become familiar with technology, literacy and adaptive learning for middle school and high school students. 2) Teachers will be introduced to the free materials available that align with NGSS standards. 3) Teachers will be given ideas on how to incorporate these lessons in class

SPEAKERS:
Diane Ripollone (Cardinal Gibbons High School: Raleigh, NC), Kathy Biernat (Zanilu Educational Services, LLC: No City, No State)

Inoculating Against Science Denial

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Too many students fall for disinformation. Learning facts is not enough. New research shows students need more critical-thinking skills, and supplemental curriculum helps.

TAKEAWAYS:
Critical-thinking curriculum is available to help “inoculate” students against disinformation and science denial.

SPEAKERS:
David Hundsness (Critical Thinking Project: PACIFICA, CA)

Science Education in an Age of Misinformation

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W184d


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

We are living in an Age of Misinformation. Developing the capabilities to evaluate scientific information is a key goal of scientific literacy. Moreover, “obtaining, evaluating and communicating information” is a core practice of NGSS. The NGSS standards, however, were developed a decade ago before misinformation became so pervasive and were not developed to address this threat. Much of this misinformation is scientific. Therefore, this session will present a set of ideas and materials about how to address this challenge. These have emerged from a report developed at Stanford University drawing on the expertise of an international group of science educators, scientists and psychologists entitled “Science Education in an Age of Misinformation”. In this session, we will present the main arguments and recommendations of the report. Using a set of practical, web-based classroom examples, participants will work in small groups to trial and discuss the suggested teaching approaches and materials we have developed. Opportunities will be provided for feedback, questions and discussion in a final plenary. What we will present will empower teachers of science with ways they can support their students to avoid being misled by the purveyors of misinformation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn what are the challenges posed by misinformation and what they can do to help science education address this challenge using practical examples of exercises and ionnovative teaching materials.

SPEAKERS:
Daniel Pimentel (Stanford University: Stanford, CA)

“With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility”: Using Pop Culture to Teach Science

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
“With great power comes great responsibility”- Using Pop Culture to Teach Science.pptx
“With great power comes great responsibility”- Using Pop Culture to Teach Science.pptx
The URL for the google slides has the embedded videos and links. The PPT videos may not work as well, but the links to all of the videos are in our sources section.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Can pop culture help better foster scientific habits and student engagement? A science educator and a pop culture scholar provide ideas and resources.

TAKEAWAYS:
Ideas for integrating pop culture and science teaching.

SPEAKERS:
Zachery Franks (Glenbrook North High School: Northbrook, IL), Vito Dipinto (National Louis University at Wheeling: Wheeling, IL)

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