2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

All sessions added to My Agenda prior to this notice have been exported to the mobile app and will be visible in your account when the app launches. Any sessions added now, will also have to be added in the app.
Grade Level


Topics




























Strands









Session Type












Pathway/Course

FILTERS APPLIED:Postsecondary, Presentation, Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom, General Science

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
10 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

NSTA First-Timers Orientation Session

Thursday, July 21 • 7:30 AM - 8:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


Show Details

Feeling overwhelmed by all there is to see and do at an NSTA conference on science education? Join us for an interactive exploration through the conference app and NSTA’s social media. By the end of the session, you will know just how to get the most from your conference experience in addition to building new networks with your science colleagues.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Allan (University of Central Oklahoma: Edmond, OK)

Exploring a General-Education Science Class Designed to Teach Skills, Not Facts

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W186a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Teach Skills Not Facts Handout
Teach Skills, Not Facts Article

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

General-education science classes are often the last chance we have to empower students with the science literacy skills necessary to navigate today’s world. But what is science literacy? Memorizing facts and following recipe-like labs? Or is it understanding how the process of science learns about the world by testing explanations and critically scrutinizing the evidence? A good science education teaches students how, not what, to think. Science isn’t just what we know; it’s how we know. This presentation explores a novel course developed using a backward design approach designed to teach the essential skills of critical thinking, information literacy, and science literacy. By focusing on the process of science over content, students learn how to evaluate the evidence for claims to determine how we know something. Directly including pseudoscience (e.g. astrology, psychics, homeopathy, Bigfoot) and science denial (e.g. climate change, evolution, GMOs) increases engagement, addresses common misconceptions, and teaches students how to recognize the characteristics of good science. Assignments and activities in which students actively create misinformation inoculates them against the real thing. Finally, providing students with a structured toolkit to evaluate claims (with lots of opportunities to practice) helps students apply what they’re learning to the “real world.”

TAKEAWAYS:
The goal of general education science should not be memorizing facts, but learning the essential skills of critical thinking, information literacy, and science literacy.

SPEAKERS:
Melanie Trecek-King (Massasoit Community College)

Informal Science Share-a-Thon

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 3:40 PM

McCormick Place - W183c


Show Details

Informal science can be found every day in the world around us. Visit exhibitors at the Share-a-thon to learn about many of those incredible examples.

SPEAKERS:
Brian Kutsch (National Science Teaching Association, eCYBERMISSION)

A Model for Recruiting and Retaining Hispanic Students in STEM Fields

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W181b


Show Details

Hispanic students are a growing minority in school systems. However, the number of Hispanic students earning certificates and degrees in STEM fields at the post-secondary level is far below that of other students. To address this problem, Hispanic students and their families need to be introduced to STEM subjects (including hands-on activities) and STEM professionals (including professors and students majoring in STEM fields) beginning in elementary school. This communication and relationship building needs to continue in both middle school and high school. It then culminates with dual enrollment classes, mentorships, and internships at the community college level. In this presentation, you will be introduced to the RHiTA (recruiting Hispanics to achieve) program at Walters State Community College and the Hispanic STEM engagement pipeline. You will hear about the successes and the failures of this program and the plans for the future. You will be given tips and advice to create a similar program at your college.

TAKEAWAYS:
Develop and implement a pipeline from elementary school to community college in STEM subjects to engage Hispanic students.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Moore (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN), Elesha Goodfriend (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN)

Making Group Work Fair: The Potential Pitfalls of Student Peer Evaluations

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Although group projects have been shown to increase learning and cooperation, bullying can sneak into student peer evaluations. Examples and alternatives to ghosting presented.

TAKEAWAYS:
Science classrooms are a great place for group projects to enhance learning, but students may unwittingly be ghosted from their group, ultimately making them seem like they are not a team player. We as teachers must be diligent against bullying/ghosting.

SPEAKERS:
Diane Huelskamp (Wright State University-Lake Campus: Celina, OH)

Lessons Learned: Strategies to Address Invisible Illnesses and Health-Impairment Disabilities in STEM Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W179a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Resources and strategies to support P–12 and postsecondary students in STEM classrooms who have invisible illnesses/ health-impairment disabilities will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will get an overview of resources and strategies that address the need for safe and equitable learning environments for P–12 and postsecondary students with invisible disabilities/ health-impairment illnesses in STEM classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Grim-Hunter (Chicago State University: Chicago, IL)

Digging Deeper into the Data with an Adapted CER Framework

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

This session focuses on improved outcomes for students’ written science explanations when including data description prompts and instructional facilitation to adapt the CER framework.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn about the importance of a preliminary step of incorporating data descriptions when utilizing the CER framework to guide students’ written explanations and reasoning of data visualization.

SPEAKERS:
Andrea Drewes (Rider University: Lawrenceville, NJ)

Preservice Teacher Session: Science Teaching 101 - Building a Foundation for Effective Science Teaching

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W183a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Science Teaching 101 Building a Foundation for Effective Science Teaching
During this presentation, we modeled a 5E hands-on elementary science lesson for first grade on how to read a thermometer (Georgia Standards of Excellence) and engaged participants in figuring out the rationale behind the instruction. We shared findings from the Frameworks for K-12 Science Education, as well as how that research led to the development of 3D instruction. Sensemaking was introduced through the lens of social constructivism and how it promotes equitable science instruction practic

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Science teaching has evolved. What worked in the 20th century doesn’t work today. Schools are different, students are different, and most importantly, classrooms are different. Instruction is guided by standards, and research drives pedagogy. Teachers entering the profession can’t expect to teach “the way they were taught” and be effective. In this session, we plan to share the basics in research with preservice and new teachers about what makes for effective instruction and how to effectively integrate science across the curriculum. Findings from the Frameworks for K-12 Science Education will be shared, as well as how that research led to the development of 3D instruction. Sensemaking through the lens of social constructivism will guide the session to help our newest colleagues teach using 21st-century pedagogy. Activities will model instructional practice and explain the why for instructional practice.

TAKEAWAYS:
An overview of research-based practices in teaching science for the beginner and resources for research-based instructional practices.

SPEAKERS:
Lorraine Ramirez Villarin (University of North Georgia: Dahlonega, GA), Donna Governor (University of North Georgia: Dahlonega, GA)

Preservice Teacher Session: What to expect as a novice science teacher - A guide to student teaching and your first year

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W183a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Student teaching and the first year of teaching can be unsettling experiences for preservice teachers. They have a million concerns and even more questions! This session brings together a panel of newly graduated seniors and new teachers to talk about their experiences and allow attendees to ask questions. A similar session was included at the Spring Engage conference in 2021 and it was highly attended, leading us to understand the importance of these types of dialogues for preservice teachers.

TAKEAWAYS:
Preservice teachers can be better prepared to student teach and begin their first jobs from new teachers who have just experienced interning or been through their first year.

SPEAKERS:
Natalie Johnson (Chestatee Academy), Lizz Holtz (Glenn C. Jones Middle School: Buford, GA)

Engaging Preservice Elementary Teachers in Making Sense of Sensemaking in Science

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W179a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Engaging Preservice Teachers in Making Sense of Sensemaking Presentation Folder

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Strategies from a teacher educator that foster sensemaking and three-dimensional learning with preservice elementary teachers using immersive content experiences highlighting instructional methods and metacognition.

TAKEAWAYS:
When preservice teachers/teachers are given the opportunity to experience and analyze sensemaking in the context of grade-level learning experiences, they are better prepared to foster sensemaking in their classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS)

Back to Top