2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:6 - 8, Hands-On Workshop, Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom, Life Science

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
14 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Increasing Scientific Literacy: Strategies, Free Activities, and Resources That Work!

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W178a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Participants will learn strategies and receive numerous resources that increase students’ scientific literacy. The hands-on approach has participants engaged in the activities, games, and more.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will: 1. learn new strategies for incorporating scientific literacy into their lessons; and 2. receive numerous activities, templates, games, and other resources to help with doing this. These resources can be used “as is” or modified to allow for differentiation based on the needs of the learners. Strategies and resources will include ones effective with ELL and EC students.

SPEAKERS:
Iris Mudd (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools: Winston Salem, NC)

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) - An Effective Approach to Ensuring an Inclusive Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines are a tool that can be used to design learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners (CAST, 2018). Instructional designers and teachers can use these principles to create learning environments that reduce barriers to access for all students, while keeping in mind the learning goals of the lesson. The three guiding principles of UDL are engagement, representation, and action and expression. In this session educators will be provided with examples of these principles in action in sample materials from OpenSciEd and classroom videos. In these examples, participating will identify how the materials have been purposefully designed with multiple avenues for engagement, representation, and action and expression. Additionally, they will identify the built-in supports for teachers to highlight student assets and to address potential barriers to learning for their local student population. Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Carlos, CA)

Broaden Science Participation: Unpack “Analyze & Interpret” to Teach Data As an Equalizer

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document and a slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

We live in a data-driven world, and our students will be working in a data-driven workforce. Therefore, it is critical that our Pre-K-12 students learn foundational data literacy skills. However, currently these skills are too often only taught in upper-level classes. All students need these skills and all students, down to our little Pre-Kers, can work with and make sense of science data. Let’s make sure data is an equalizer, rather than another divider in our educational system and society! Join us as we explore what perception and learning science tell us about how our brains process data. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources to build science knowledge and self-efficacy through data. Finally, we will explore ways to adapt our existing curriculum activities and data visualizations to help our students more equitably access science. Through hands-on activities and group discussions, participants will leave more empowered to leverage data and data visualizations into their science content in purposeful ways for all learners. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall 21st century skills. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century for all students and ways to adjust existing curriculum to leverage data as entry points into science inquiry, sensemaking, and knowledge for all learners to see themselves in STEM.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, LLC: No City, No State)

How Did the Elk Cross the Road?

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W178b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
AZGFD K-12 Education Resources (Focus Wild)
Crossing Structure Videos
Elk Crossing Graph
Highway Map Crossing Locations
How did the Elk Cross the Road
program
Notes Handout
Slide Deck

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

By the end of this session, participants will be able to: - Explain the impact of roads on wildlife - Analyze data to design wildlife-friendly crossing structures - Use hands-on tools to teach STEM concepts The majority of this session will focus on real world data analysis and problem solving. Working in small groups, participants will propose solutions to a number of related scenarios. First, they’ll analyze data to determine if highways pose a significant threat to wildlife. Relevant vocabulary will be introduced – including fragmentation, migratory barriers, porosity and passage rates – as we explore the need for ways to move animals across highways without impacting humans. Once a need is determined, they’ll continue their exploration by looking at potential crossing structure solutions. They’ll identify structure location and wildlife-friendly designs to ensure the highest use. They’ll be asked to either create a model or blueprint of their design. Finally, participants will discuss ways to determine the crossing structure effectiveness. This will include a cost/benefit analysis. Additional resources to expand learning will be shared, including links, books, videos, contacts and professional development.

TAKEAWAYS:
Science and Engineering Practices are used by wildlife biologists to help manage wildlife populations and those same skills can be developed in students.

SPEAKERS:
Eric Proctor (Arizona Game and Fish Department: Phoenix, AZ)

Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

Evolution Game: Demystifying Speciation

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W195



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Evolution Game slide show
These slides will be used in the workshop to introduce and explain using the Evolution Game as a teaching tool. The game clarifies how species evolve through mutations, natural selection, and just plain luck. Students "evolve" their creatures, use their artistic abilities to draw mutations, and have fun while learning.

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

This session will start with an overview of the challenges involved in teaching the theory of evolution, including common student misconceptions. Participants will then spend 30 minutes playing the Evolution Game, developed by the speaker, in which players evolve and sketch the changes to their species. The game is really fun and involves, student inquiry, collaboration, problem solving, and touches on the engineering of species that is inherent in evolution. The session will end with a discussion of concepts learned, a copy of an assessment sheet will be shared, and all participants will leave with an electronic copy of the game.

TAKEAWAYS:
Demystifying how good, bad, and benign mutations can make a species survive, evolve, or become extinct through an interactive, fun board game.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Faulkner (East Granby Middle School: East Granby, CT)

Data, Tables, Graphs, Oh My! Strategies to Get All Students Doing & Speaking Science

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Access to Resource Document
Complete the Google Form to gain access to the Resource Document and slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

We are naturally curious, prone to ask why? How? What? Unfortunately, somewhere along the way students lose the trust in their voices to ask questions of and from data. But data are what we use to do science and it permeates all aspects of society today. What should we do? Stop teaching the vocabulary of science and data first, and instead leverage classroom-ready strategies to empower students to lead with their innate curiosity to practice critical 21st century data literacy skills and master the science content. Join us to explore connections between our science content, inquiry-based activities, and data skills. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy and student empowerment. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better help students do and communicate science. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall self-identity as a scientist. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century, how students can do a lot more with data than we often think or presume from their science vocabulary alone, and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into 6-12 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, LLC: No City, No State)

Let's Get Middle School Students Interested in Climate Change!

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

What causes seasons on Earth? How is permafrost affected by climate change? What can we learn from ice cores about climate? These questions are answered through a series of NGSS aligned, hands-on activities. Students design an experiment to test the effect of Earth’s tilt on seasons, explore the effect of climate change on structures built on permafrost, and more! The eesmarts climate change curriculum is composed of adapted lessons surrounding natural cycles that occur on Earth and in our solar system, including the carbon cycle and sunspot activity, how these cycles affect populations, and how humans may affect natural cycles. Activities examine evidence from the past through proxies such as tree rings, cherry tree blossoms, and ice core data. Additional topics include climate and ecosystems, the impact of invasive species, and how to minimize the effect of human activity. The lessons are part of the eesmarts K-12 curriculum, an energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy learning initiative funded by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund. They are written in the 5-E Instructional Model and include presentation Google Slides and handouts. Select digital resources will be provided to participants. The complete eesmarts program is free and available to all Connecticut educators.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore activities involving natural cycles including the sun cycle, the carbon cycle, and seasons, as well as a variety of proxies and what they can tell us about Earth’s climate past and present.

SPEAKERS:
Kathleen Brooks (CREC: No City, No State), Karin Jakubowski (eesmarts: No City, No State)

Meet Me in the Middle, Lite: A Share-a-Thon

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
UIC Teacher Fellows Info
Informational Flyer on Teacher Fellows program to develop classroom learning companion robots

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Engage in a variety of activities, collect information and resources, and network with middle level leaders. Discover new ideas and materials that you can use next week.

TAKEAWAYS:
The participants will network with other middle level science educators and leaders to discover and engage in activities that will expand their knowledge and be usable in all aspects of their work.

SPEAKERS:
Mary Lou Lipscomb (National Middle Level Science Teachers Association: Naperville, IL), Alison Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Carey Dieleman (National Science Teaching Association: No City, No State), Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ), Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA), Suzanne Cunningham (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN), Katy Garvey (The Source for Learning, Inc.: Reston, VA), Nicole Green (Animalearn: Jenkintown, PA), Joseph Michaelis (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Kim Nagle (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Anne Schoeffler (Seton Catholic School: Hudson, OH), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Alison Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Corydon Strawser (Lake Nona Middle School: Orlando, FL), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA), Barbara Phillips-Bredlow (Northeast Nodaway School District: Ravenwood, MO), Dawn Konieczny (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Erin Towns (Edward Little High School: Auburn, ME)

NGSS-Focused Summative Classroom Assessments of Three-Dimensional Learning

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NGSS Summative Assessments_NSTA_Chicago_2022.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Explore classroom-tested benchmark assessments and scoring guides you can use to assess students’ three-dimensional learning related to middle school performance expectations.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn about a comprehensive set of free, summative benchmark 3-D assessments designed to be used in any NGSS-focused middle school classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Maia Binding (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA), Wendy Jackson (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA)

Problem Centered Teaching by Tomorrow

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation Link

STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Problem centered instruction is a great way to engage students, integrate content, inspire learning, and naturally incorporate all three dimensions of the NRC Framework. However, true problem centered instruction requires a major shift in both teaching and learning, requiring the one thing teachers don't have: time--the last thing teachers need is another pedagogical strategy that disrupts their entire routine. Teachers will have the opportunity to voice their concerns and discuss some barriers of problem centered teaching and learning, while also addressing the benefits for both teachers and students. Considering the benefits, there are some immediate changes that teachers can use to help shift to a problem centered environment. Recalling that problem centered learning should be complex, meaningful, and open-ended, the four strategies are: 1) Make the Content Relatable, 2) Structure: Less is More, 3) Be a Resource, Not an Answer Key, and 4) Use a Problem to Introduce a Topic. Teachers will then have an opportunity to put the strategies to immediate use by picking a lesson or topic and work with others to transform it into a three-dimensional, problem centered lesson.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will explore four strategies that promote three-dimensional learning through the process of problem centered instruction that is complex, meaningful, and open-ended. They will discuss benefits and barriers to the problem centered approach from the perspective of both the instructor and the learner. Teachers will have an opportunity to brainstorm and work collaboratively on transforming a lesson or topic of their choice into a problem centered, reality based scenario that seamlessly integrates the Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Cassandra Armstrong (Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy: Aurora, IL)

Reasoning is Reachable: New Tools for Supporting Scientific Argumentation in Amplify Science Units

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W187c


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Engaging in argument from evidence is often the culminating scientific practice for units focused on sensemaking. High-quality units present students with a driving question about a meaningful, complex phenomenon and engage them in a variety of practices to investigate the driving question. A significant challenge that students face in an extended unit is keeping track of the evidence they are collecting and connecting that evidence to the key scientific concepts. Over the last four years, researchers at The Learning Partnership and Northern Illinois University have been collaborating with middle school science teachers at two Chicago elementary schools to co-design tools for supporting students in developing scientific arguments. (1) The Investigation Steps chart uses the NGSS storyline structure to highlight how students will use scientific practices to conduct their investigations and then record what was figured out each day. (2) The Evidence Sorter provides a structure for organizing and weighing evidence and connecting that evidence to reasoning as a precursor to writing their argument. Prior research shows the importance of connecting evidence to key concepts throughout a unit. The tools provide a means for teachers to monitor how students are making these connections and applying those connections in their final argument.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Introduction to tools for supporting students in connecting what is learned each day to the unit goal. 2. Introduction to tools for supporting students in synthesizing evidence and connecting reasoning to develop a scientific argument. 3. Research shows the importance of connecting evidence and key concepts throughout a unit

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Morales (John W. Garvy: Chicago, IL), Randi McGee-Tekula (The Learning Partnership: Western Springs, IL), Emily Dubicki (Mozart Elementary: Chicago, IL), Anne Britt (Dr.: Dekalb, IL), Steven McGee (The Learning Partnership: Western Springs, IL)

NESTA and SSSA: Know Soil, Know Life—Dig into the Connections!

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

More than just dirt, soil is vital to life on the planet. Join us as we explore the how’s and why’s of the soil-life connection.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn the fundamental linkages between soils and life while being immersed in numerous activities and demonstrations that support classroom integration of soil topics.

SPEAKERS:
Clay Robinson (CRC Consulting: No City, No State), Susan Chapman (Soil Science Society of America: Madison, WI)

Using Nonfiction Children's Books to Engage Students of All Ages in Biology Content

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W181c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Children's Book List NSTA.docx

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Nonfiction for children has changed over the years with a wide variety of types, formats, and writing styles with captivating photos, illustrations, and artwork that engages and informs students of all ages. This interactive session will allow participants to observe a large collection of nonfiction children’s books. These books cover a variety of biology topics, such as chemistry, cells, genetics, diversity of life, microbiology, evolution and ecology. They will also provide information on ecosystem organisms, chemical cycling, and soil background. Books that highlight the life and achievements of a variety of scientists will also be presented to participants. The session will explain how the children’s books are used in several introductory college biology courses to introduce/reinforce textbook content for public health, nursing, elementary education, and other non-science majors. This format can easily be transferred to grade 6-12 classrooms. In the elementary education courses, the books are used in the 5E model format. Students connect science standards, along with explore and expand activities, to the children’s books for a semester collection of elementary lessons. The book list can be used by elementary teachers for nonfiction literacy assignments, library resources, science club activities, and engaging content for science standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
This interactive session will allow participants to observe a large collection of nonfiction children’s books. These books will cover a variety of biology topics, provide ecosystem background information, and highlight the life and achievements of a variety of scientists. The session will explain how the children’s books are used in several introductory college biology and K-12 curriculums.

SPEAKERS:
Mary Gobbett (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN), Alicia Cecil (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

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