2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:Presentation, Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom, Life Science

 

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Lunch: Elements of Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Wednesday, July 20 • 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Regency Ballroom


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

By Invitation Only

Shifting from traditional professional development to curriculum-based professional learning is a simple concept but complex to design and execute well. At its core, it means teachers experience the same kind of inquiry-based learning we expect them to provide their students. Learn more about a Carnegie Corporation of New York report, The Elements, which identifies a core set of research-based actions, approaches, and enabling conditions that effective schools and systems have put in place to reinforce and amplify the power of high-quality curriculum and skillful teaching.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Examine beliefs and assumptions regarding the relationship between high-quality instructional materials, curriculum-based professional learning and student success 2. Gain understanding of the foundation for The Elements, a challenge paper from Carnegie Corporation of New York 3. Learn from science practitioners whose successful curriculum implementation efforts are grounded in the elements and essentials.

SPEAKERS:
Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a Brand New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Since its release, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the NGSS has become an essential tool for many educators across the country. A new version titled the Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimension has been developed to not only support teachers in all states that have standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education. This new version of the Quick-Reference Guide still contains the most useful features of the original, including descriptions of the practices and the crosscutting concepts from the Framework of K-12 Science Education and K-12 progressions of the elements of all three dimensions. In addition, the new Quick-Reference Guide contains several new features that should make it even more helpful. For example, every element now has a unique code (based on the codes in the NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions) that makes it much easier to reference a particular element. In addition, there is an entire chapter devoted to the Performance Expectations. Finally, the guide also contains a number of tools for working with standards. This session will outline all of the features of the guide through the process of unpacking the crosscutting concepts to better understand how to make curriculum, instruction, and assessment more three-dimensional.

TAKEAWAYS:
A deeper understanding of the Crosscutting Concepts and how a well-designed reference guide can make it easier to unpack the three dimensions for work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Everything You Always Wanted to Know about NGSS, But Were Afraid to Ask

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W175a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Everything you always wanted to know about NGSS_Handout.pdf
Everything you always wanted to know about NGSS_Presentation.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The NGSS is very complicated. The Institute for Quality Science Teaching at the Museum of Science and Industry provides professional learning opportunities for science teachers in Chicagoland and surrounding areas. Our approach is to ground everything we do in the NGSS and take a deep dive into all the elements of 3-dimensional learning. Professional learning programs at MSI are invested in helping teachers understand how to teach science effectively to meet these standards. Teachers in our programs learn science content in the context of 3-dimensional lessons, as instructors demonstrate instructional practices that enable NGSS-aligned teaching and learning. This presentation will review the basics of the NGSS, the 3 dimensions, how they’re combined in Performance Expectations, and the basics of enacting the NGSS in the classroom. If you need a refresher, just want a review, or still don’t have all those acronyms straight in your head, this is the presentation for you.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will leave with a basic understanding of the structures of the Next Generation Science Standards and how they inform 3-dimensional standards and 3-dimensional science teaching.

SPEAKERS:
Lauren Slanker (Museum of Science and Industry: Chicago, IL), Karin Klein (Museum of Science and Industry: Chicago, IL)

Lucy’s Legacy – Human Evolution for the 21st Century Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The 1974 discovery of the iconic Lucy fossil in Ethiopia changed our understanding of human origins. Almost everyone today knows of Lucy, but over the last 48 years the field of human origins has exploded thanks to new discoveries all over the world as well as critical new developments in the realm of molecular biology. Few biology classes address these advances. However, the tools and techniques students learn in STEM classes have a direct connection to the advances and changes that have shaped modern work with human origins. Attending this session will give you the chance to appreciate the revolution that has occurred since “Lucy” and offer you tools to bring new understanding to your students in ways you can weave into your curriculum in less controversial ways connected to evolution, fossils, DNA, proteomics, genealogy, biogeography, 3D printing, as well as topics related to more recent human evolution (skin color, lactose tolerance, and high-altitude adaptation). As a 32-year K-12 human evolution educator who has been fortunate to work with leaders in the field, I have had a front row seat to many of the milestones of human evolution in the 21st century and I’m eager to share them with you.

TAKEAWAYS:
Since the discovery of Lucy, our understanding of human origins has grown and changed thanks to new discoveries and technologies – participants will learn about these amazing changes and how to integrate these new discoveries into their biology curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
John Mead (St. Mark's School of Texas: Allen, TX)

Exploring a General-Education Science Class Designed to Teach Skills, Not Facts

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W186a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Teach Skills Not Facts Handout
Teach Skills, Not Facts Article

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

General-education science classes are often the last chance we have to empower students with the science literacy skills necessary to navigate today’s world. But what is science literacy? Memorizing facts and following recipe-like labs? Or is it understanding how the process of science learns about the world by testing explanations and critically scrutinizing the evidence? A good science education teaches students how, not what, to think. Science isn’t just what we know; it’s how we know. This presentation explores a novel course developed using a backward design approach designed to teach the essential skills of critical thinking, information literacy, and science literacy. By focusing on the process of science over content, students learn how to evaluate the evidence for claims to determine how we know something. Directly including pseudoscience (e.g. astrology, psychics, homeopathy, Bigfoot) and science denial (e.g. climate change, evolution, GMOs) increases engagement, addresses common misconceptions, and teaches students how to recognize the characteristics of good science. Assignments and activities in which students actively create misinformation inoculates them against the real thing. Finally, providing students with a structured toolkit to evaluate claims (with lots of opportunities to practice) helps students apply what they’re learning to the “real world.”

TAKEAWAYS:
The goal of general education science should not be memorizing facts, but learning the essential skills of critical thinking, information literacy, and science literacy.

SPEAKERS:
Melanie Trecek-King (Massasoit Community College)

The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

One of the key features of the NGSS and other standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education is the idea that a “a progression of knowledge occurs from grade band to grade band that gives students the opportunity to learn more complex material, leading to an overall understanding of science by the end of high school.” (NGSS Appendix A, p. 2) The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions has a set of 62 maps that illustrate the how the elements of the three dimensions build on each other and connect to one another. Each map focuses on a particular topic and shows the progression students are expected to make in that topic from one grade-span to the next. Arrows connecting individual elements on a map indicate that competency in one element is useful in learning to achieve the other element. Educators can use maps to deepen their understanding of the standards to plan or improve curriculum, instruction, and assessment. This session will provide participants guidance on how to read the maps in the Atlas and use this powerful tool to deepen their understanding of elements of the standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
A careful review of the connections between elements of the three dimensions can provide a clearer understanding of science standards and important guidance in planning instructional sequences to support three-dimensional teaching and learning.

SPEAKERS:
Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Crash Science: When Physics Meets Biology

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Use innovative video-assisted STEM activities, demonstrations, award-winning videos, and behind-the-crash-tests tours to teach the science of car crashes. Visit classroom.iihs.org for more information.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants learn how to incorporate culminating STEM design challenges (Project Pedestrian Sensors and Egg-Carrying Paper Car Crash) into their curriculum to promote student awareness and understanding of how engineering and technology are used to build safer vehicles.

SPEAKERS:
Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

Including Teachers in Developing Large-Scale Assessments for Science

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Learn about the novel approach taken by Illinois to include teacher voice in developing a statewide three-dimensional science assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about the process of developing a state-wide assessment written by local educators.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Harvey Henson (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL), ANGELA BOX (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: CARTERVILLE, IL)

The STEM of PBL

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
_Main_Course.pdf
http://bit.ly/STEMPBLQA
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1c38TeuqPSC-vS8GLiVXQH9GzI7g0sjbx/view?usp=sharing
STEM PBL in action
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HyFVEpZyEY
STEM PBL in action
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
Guiding questions
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a487rcwqsLc
The Engineering Design Process/Journal Reflections
Projects VS PBL.docx
What Is PBL_ARTICLE.pdf
Why Is PBL Important_ARTICLE.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Participants will understand how to develop and effectively implement STEM curriculum units that include project based activities and performance based assessments. Participants will learn to help students answer complex questions and develop solutions for challenges and real-world problems. They will also assist students with extending and refining their acquired knowledge to routinely analyze and solve problems. By the end of this session: 1) Participants will gain a clear and coherent understanding of what a STEM PBL is and how it works. 2) Participants will be able to identify and create effective essential questions. 3) Participants will be able to identify and apply the components of a STEM PBL. 4) Understand how STEM PBL’s will impact instruction for participants and students. Agenda: What is PBL? Why is it important? How does a STEM PBL Work? How to effectively integrate journal reflections. Ways to Implement STEM PBL’s

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to effectively implement STEM PBL’s (Project Based Learning) by integrating the components of STEM and PBL in order to grow students' capacity for creativity, fun, and back-loaded learning in a STEM context.

SPEAKERS:
Adero Carter (Clayton County Public Schools: Jonesboro, GA)

A Rubric Design for Making Sense of Elementary Students’ 3D Knowledge and Understanding.

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W186c


STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

This session explores two key challenges faced by elementary school teachers for promoting 3D learning as outlined by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). These are: (1) how to make sense of 3D proficiency based on student responses to assessment tasks, and (2) how to use student responses to inform next steps in instruction. We will address these challenges by guiding participants as they explore a set of 3D assessment tasks that are freely available online. These tasks have been developed in collaboration with teachers for performance expectations in physical science, life science, and earth and space science. During the session, we will highlight how the tasks help elicit what students know and can do. Participants will then learn about the features of the associated rubrics and practice applying rubrics to make sense of student responses. We will also share how information from rubric use can inform next steps in instruction and engage participants in a discussion about instructional decision making. Through this process, participants will learn about rubric features that will inform their own creations and adaptations of rubrics. Furthermore, participants will learn about various resources that are freely available.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn about the features of a new rubric that has been designed based on feedback from elementary school teachers. Through examples and discussions, attendees will learn how the rubric can help them evaluate student responses in a timely manner and provide detailed information about what students know and can do. This information can be valuable in linking student responses to 3D proficiencies and in determining instructional next-steps for teachers.

SPEAKERS:
Sania Zaidi (Education Development Center, Inc.: Waltham, MA), Samuel Arnold (Research Assistant: Chicago, IL)

Strategies to Improve Communications in Inclusive Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W181c


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Improve inclusive classroom dynamics between teachers, families, and students by reflecting on disability model perspectives, identifying barriers to collaboration, and determining effective avenues of communication.

TAKEAWAYS:
The triangle of inclusion presents pathways that can be used by administrators and teachers to recognize and overcome barriers faced within the inclusive classroom and includes strategies such as early open communications, student advocacy, professional learning opportunities, and mentorships.

SPEAKERS:
Nicole Wack (East Penn School District: Emmaus, PA)

AP Biology Science Exploration: How to Engage AP Students After the Exam and Increase Community Involvement in STEM

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W187a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
elementary_name_tags.pdf
elementary_science_explorations_instructions.pdf
Science Explorations_NSTA_2022.pdf
student ideas.pdf
student_grading_sheet.doc

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This presentation will include a proven model for allowing elementary students to explore and experience AP Biology content (at their level).

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will take with them a protocol and resources for the successful implementation of an idea of what to do after the AP Biology exam. This allows AP students to explore a topic of interest and share that topic with elementary students.

SPEAKERS:
Scott VanderVeen (Valley Christian High School: San Jose, CA)

Teaching Critical-Thinking Skills to Reluctant Teenagers

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W181b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Teaching Critical Thinking skills to reluctant teenagers.pptx

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Learn how to overcome the apathy of teenagers, understand their motivations for not asking questions, and get them to be curious again!

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will take away multiple strategies to implement in their classroom to spark the curiosity of teens they teach.

SPEAKERS:
Jamye Carr (Cedar Ridge High School: Hillsborough, NC)

Inspiring the Next Generation of Zoologists through a High School and Informal Science Partnership

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W180


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

A partnership between University Prep Science and Math High school and the Detroit Zoological Society is providing students with opportunities to explore careers in zoology and conservation. Hands-on learning in the classroom with highly qualified teachers is complemented with regular visits to the Detroit Zoo, local green spaces, and the Belle Isle Aquarium, where students participate in facilitated programming, collect data for individual projects, and engage with content area experts. Over the four years in the Zoology Pathway program, students build their conceptual understanding of science skills through authentic learning experiences and explore topics of their personal interest in depth. This program has the potential to support students from groups who are historically underrepresented in STEM fields, including life sciences, and provide them an advantage as they pursue post-secondary opportunities and future careers with an already established professional network.

TAKEAWAYS:
Partnerships between schools and informal science organizations can support underrepresented students in pursuing post-secondary STEM opportunities. Pairing informal and formal science learning can build interest in STEM content, especially for students who are historically underrepresented in STEM fields. Co-collaboration of learning experiences leads to more robust, long-term partnerships.

SPEAKERS:
Claire Lannoye-Hall (Detroit Zoological Society: Royal Oak, MI)

Join Us for the Elementary STEM Showcase!

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W183a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Exploring Energy Transfer in Ecosystems with SageModeler
Mars Mission Specialist.pdf
Mindfulness Jar recipe
Touch-Talk-Text Practices that support reading and science instruction

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Wander your way through 30 different STEM stations to learn about resources, lessons, and teaching strategies to incorporate more STEM into your school and classroom. This farmer's market–type event brings together educators, authors, researchers, and leaders in early childhood through fifth-grade STEM education. Leave with a mindful of great ideas and be inspired!

TAKEAWAYS:
Pick up great ideas and be inspired during this farmer's market–type event.

SPEAKERS:
Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Heather Pacheco-Guffrey (Bridgewater State University: Bridgewater, MA), Lauren Burrow (Stephen F. Austin State University: Nacogdoches, TX), Susan Erickson (Country School: Weston, MA), Sara Nelson (Iowa State University: Ames, IA), Constance Beecher (Iowa State University: Ames, IA), Elizabeth Dethloff (Robert R. Shaw Center for STEAM: Katy, TX), Christine Preston (The University of Sydney: Sydney, 0), Catherine Scott (Coastal Carolina University: Conway, SC), Kristin Cook (Bellarmine University: Louisville, KY), Richard Cox, Jr. (Atrium Health), Annette Venegas (Kent School District: Kent, WA), Juliette Guarino Berg (The Town School: New York, NY), Katie Morrison (University Child Development School: Seattle, WA), Wendi Laurence (Education Specialist: Park City, UT), Katrina Kmak (Park City Library: Park City, UT), Brittnie Hecht (Park City Library: Park City, UT), Diana Lockwood (Author & Executive Director), Godwyn Morris (Dazzling Discoveries / Skill Mill NYC: New York, NY), Bridget Miller (University of South Carolina: Columbia, SC), Christie Martin (University of South Carolina: Columbia, SC), Rebecca Kurson (Collegiate School: New York, NY), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Shelly Counsell (Self Employed Consultant: No City, No State), Belle Akers (Convent & Stuart Hall's Schools of the Sacred Heart: San Francisco, CA), Kathleen Tate (American Public University System: Charles Town, WV), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS), Bill Burton (Tatnall School: Wilmington, DE), Barbara Bromley (Hazelwood Elementary School: Lynnwood, WA), Kim Stilwell (BIOZONE Corp.: Parker, CO), Nancy McIntyre (Robotics Education & Competition Foundation: Greenville, TX), Shari Haug (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL), Jane Savatski (Janet Berry Elementary School: Appleton, WI), Katrina Pavlik (Deputy Executive Director: Oakbrook Terrace, IL), Mitchell Rosenberg (Kinderlab Robotics, Inc.: Waltham, MA), Tiffany Leones (Digital Promise: Washington, DC), Beth Dykstra VanMeeteren (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA), Danielle Scharen (North Carolina State University: Raleigh, NC), Frances Hamilton (The University of Alabama in Huntsville: Huntsville, AL), Jennifer Williams (Isidore Newman School: New Orleans, LA), Anne Lowry (Aleph Academy: Reno, NV)

Genome: Unlocking Life's Code - Genetics Resources from NSTA and NIH

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W184b-c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Genome: Unlocking Life's Code Collection

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

In this session, participants will be given an overview of the Food Allergy Storyline, a High School Unit that addresses LS1.A and LS3.A. The anchoring phenomenon for the unit is something familiar yet still mysterious to this generation of students - bans on certain foods in their cafeterias and classrooms. Students will probably be able to connect the bans to food allergies but might not be able to explain why a person has food allergies. The first day of the unit allows students to consider what they do and don't know about food allergies and what they want to find out. This gives them a reason for investigating the biological mechanism behind food allergies and intolerances. In doing so, they will make sense of Disciplinary Core Ideas related to genetics and genomics.

TAKEAWAYS:
The Food Allergy Storyline provides an opportunity for students to make sense of Disciplinary Core Ideas related to genetics and genomics.

SPEAKERS:
Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Scaffolding Students’ Progression Through CCCs and SEPs Using Resources from the OpenSciEd Toolkit

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W186c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://www.openscied.org/teacher-resources/
NSTA 2022 Chicago - SEP and CCC Toolkit Slides.pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

See how tools developed within OpenSciEd units can support students’ progression of and engagement in SEPs and CCCs across a variety of unit contexts.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave with practical tools such as graphic organizers, general rubrics, and self- and peer-assessments that can be used to support students in incrementally building SEPs and CCCs in a variety of units.

SPEAKERS:
Dawn Novak (Science Educator: Grayslake, IL), Gail Housman (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Jamie Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse: A 5E Instructional Unit on the Human Body

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

The provided instructional unit will elicit students’ prior knowledge, as well as foster their individual and collective understandings of the human body.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be encouraged to utilize facet-based assessments and classroom argumentation throughout lessons framed with the 5E instructional model.

SPEAKERS:
Alicia Herrera, Ph.D. (Whitney Elementary School: No City, No State)

Preparing Teachers to Address Challenging Scientific and Environmental Topics through Research, Dialogue, and Experiential Learning

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W181c


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Ongoing findings from NSF Project: #1950232. Graduate students at an HBCU complete a 14-month accelerated pathway that leads to both a masters degree in biology and teacher certification while being supported with a $20,000.00 scholarship. Project offers unique professional development opportunities and academic interventions that aim to enhance teacher conceptual understanding and efficacy to teach challenging and controversial scientific and environmental topics such as climate change and evolution. Paper presentation will first focus on comparing teacher profiles of the project participants versus the average state graduate of traditional teacher preparation programs. Initially, project data on beginning teacher demographics and diversity will be compared to state and national averages. Here we will show project utility in recruiting diverse candidates into high school science teaching positions. Next, the session will present findings on GPA, and discipline specific content hours at the graduate and undergraduate level along with performance on licensure exams to compare aptitude in biological concepts in project participants vs other beginning teachers. This will demonstrate project impact on recruiting, training and producing science educators with strong content backgrounds. Prior research has shown that in general students that had high school teachers that were had strong content knowledge and high levels of efficacy positively impacted future STEM career and academic success (Adelman, 1999). Lastly, paper presentation will share results on a pre/post assessment of educator efficacy of teaching perceived controversial scientific topics such as evolution, climate change and vaccines. Project participants were pretested upon starting their academic program and post-tested upon completion. These results are compared to a control group of recent graduates from a secondary science traditional teacher preparation program. Findings show impact of program participation on growth of efficacy to teach controversial topics and project utility compared to traditional teacher preparation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Session participants will: 1. Develop an understanding on how to recruit diverse individuals into the profession of secondary science teaching 2. Understand the complexity of the STEM pipeline in regards to K-16 teaching and eventual student career and academic pursuits 3. Appreciate the need for scholarships, incentives, pay and ongoing professional for secondary science educators 4. Understand how content knowledge, academic preparation and experiences associated with research and professional development impact teacher effectiveness and student achievement 5. Realize the importance of teacher efficacy and the need for training at both the in-service and pre-service levels to foster its growth.

SPEAKERS:
Timothy Goodale (Elizabeth City State University: Elizabeth City, NC)

Providing actionable feedback to build students’ self-reflection skills

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W181a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Actionable Feedback.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

How many teacher comments on student work are left unread? Or, even if they are read, how useful are they to the student? Can the student positively internalize the feedback and use it to improve their work? Chances are the answer is no! But it doesn’t have to be this way! During this session, participants will learn more effective strategies for giving actionable feedback and methods to help their students utilize feedback to improve their work. First we’ll learn how to ask questions in student feedback and how differently questions are internalized by the student. For example, consider the difference between, “I don’t understand what you mean here,” and “Can you explain in more detail what you meant in this statement?” Then we’ll discover how to make sure teachers' feedback is read and used by students to improve their work. By making self reflection a formalized step in the learning process, teachers provide students opportunities to practice this important skill! Participants will receive a worksheet with feedback tips and tricks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Several methods that can be applied immediately in the classroom, providing feedback encouraging students to be self reflective of their own work.

SPEAKERS:
Regina Borriello (Clifton High School: Edison, NJ)

Incorporating the 3 Rs of Animal Use in High School Science Classes

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

A cross-disciplinary team of teachers, subject matter experts, and curriculum developers have designed resources and materials to facilitate teaching students about the use of animals in scientific research in the United States, as well as Russell and Burch’s 3 Rs principles of replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal use. The materials, which are aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, are geared toward high school science students. The modules can be taught separately or in combination, giving educators flexibility to choose specific content areas to share and explore with their students. During the session, we will present two learning plans: one that introduces students to the 3 Rs principles and how animals are used in scientific research, and another that covers the 3 Rs principles in more depth. We will share information, including teaching plans, learning materials, and performance assessment tasks associated with the curriculum, with session attendees.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will have an opportunity to learn more about the content and activities covered in two lesson plans focused on the use of animals in scientific research in the United States and the 3 Rs principles. Sample lesson plans and associated learning materials, including presentations, articles, and worksheets, will be shared with attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Pam Osenkowski (National Anti-Vivisection Society - BioLEAP: Chicago, IL)

Integrating CS into Science Storylines

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W176c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Science teachers at Lindblom Math and Science Academy in Chicago Public Schools have worked with Northwestern University’s CT-STEM department to develop computational thinking in science units aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards. The goal is for students to understand and apply computational thinking practices in their science classrooms to help make sense of phenomena or problems, analyze data, use models and develop explanations. Units, built by teachers, are designed to cover core science concepts in physics, chemistry, and biology. This program allows teachers to work with CT-STEM members to develop new simulations or other CT activities that work best in the unit. This was developed based on teacher need, when simulations didn’t exist to address the big ideas. Integration of NetLogo models, SageModeler, NetTango, and other data analysis activities are used to help students make real world connections. These tools allow students to learn and apply basic computer science ideas and skills as well as the 3-D of NGSS. Developed unit topics include: stoichiometry, climate change, gas laws, and energy. These units are available for public use and can be easily modified on the CT-STEM platform for teachers to use.

TAKEAWAYS:
Overview of how teachers integrated Computational Thinking into science units and how to access units for Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Earth Science

SPEAKERS:
Carole Namowicz (Lindblom Math and Science Academy: Chicago, IL), Lauren Levites (Lindblom Math and Science Academy: Chicago, IL)

Getting at What Students Know Without Grading Taking Over Your Life

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W178b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
getting at what students know without grading taking over your life.pptx

STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Want to know what the students actually know, but don't want to spend all of your time grading? Adjust your assessment questions.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to adapt "typical" assessment questions into more meaningful questions in order to better understand what the students know without the endless hours of grading.

SPEAKERS:
Meredith Diehl (Northview High School: Sylvania, OH)

Making Group Work Fair: The Potential Pitfalls of Student Peer Evaluations

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Although group projects have been shown to increase learning and cooperation, bullying can sneak into student peer evaluations. Examples and alternatives to ghosting presented.

TAKEAWAYS:
Science classrooms are a great place for group projects to enhance learning, but students may unwittingly be ghosted from their group, ultimately making them seem like they are not a team player. We as teachers must be diligent against bullying/ghosting.

SPEAKERS:
Diane Huelskamp (Wright State University-Lake Campus: Celina, OH)

Lessons Learned: Strategies to Address Invisible Illnesses and Health-Impairment Disabilities in STEM Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W179a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Resources and strategies to support P–12 and postsecondary students in STEM classrooms who have invisible illnesses/ health-impairment disabilities will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will get an overview of resources and strategies that address the need for safe and equitable learning environments for P–12 and postsecondary students with invisible disabilities/ health-impairment illnesses in STEM classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Grim-Hunter (Chicago State University: Chicago, IL)

Science Education Leadership: Helping Administrators Build Knowledge and Skills to Support Quality Science Instruction

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W181c


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

This session will present attendees with an up-to-date literature review, as well as original research, regarding administrators knowledge and acceptance of evolution and evolution education law. After discussing the research, a virtual library of general resources will be shared with attendees that they bring back to their school and district administrators. Additionally, attendees will learn how to locate or create resources to add to this virtual library that are specific to their state standards, specific content areas, and local communities. The goal is that attendees will return to their schools and districts and be better able to participate directly or indirectly in Instructional Leadership Team roles in their communities in order to promote high quality science instruction for their students.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn about our current understanding of administrators' knowledge of evolution and evolution education law and walk away with a virtual toolbox of resources that can be shared with building and district level administrators to better support quality science instruction.

SPEAKERS:
Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Build a K–12 STEAM Pipeline Through Family STEAM Night

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W180


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Engage students, families, and the community in STEAM through Family STEAM Nights in order to equitably build understanding and interest in STEAM.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to create, recruit, and implement a Family STEAM Night to engage students, families, and the community in STEAM.

SPEAKERS:
McKenna Serowka (Lake Zurich High School: Lake Zurich, IL)

Inspiration to Fruition

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Inspiration to Fruition

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Inspiration to Fruition provides any educator with a game plan on how to take an idea and available resources and create a project that enhances the student experience and skills.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. A template for designing a grassroots STEM or PBL project; 2. Top 10 tips on how to make managing the project actually manageable; and 3. Proof that trusting one's intuition to build a project based on an inspirational event can bring to fruition an amazing experience for students.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Hartings (Indian Hill Middle School: CINCINNATI, OH), Jessica Brown (Teacher: cincinnati, OH)

What do these numbers actually mean? Rethinking Student Grades and Scoring.

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W181b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Biology Assessment Standards.docx
What do these numbers actually mean.pptx

STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

A grading system based on total points does not accurately reflect the level of student understanding of science content. Students who demonstrate that they understand half of the content should not earn a failing score. Nor should students earn arbitrary points for doing non-science content related things. Student scores should reflect what a student understands and not how well the student can play the game we call school. We teachers are encouraged to do standards based grading, but not everyone knows how or where to start or even if it is worth putting forth the effort to make the change. Participants will be led through my journey in becoming a teacher who uses standards based grading. The struggles in changing my mindset about grades and the way I grade will be presented as well as the benefits of having a better understanding of what the students actually know, having student grades more accurately reflect what they know, having fewer students fail among other things. Basic strategies for assessing level of understanding will also be presented. Time will be given for questions and answers.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will be given strategies about changing their view of scoring students by the total number of points they got correct verses the student's level of understanding.

SPEAKERS:
Meredith Diehl (Northview High School: Sylvania, OH)

Overview of Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate Initiative, and Kikim Media

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W184b-c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate In

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

This session will introduce participants to Our Beautiful Planet,  a collection of classroom-ready films and lesson plans that highlight the science and engineering practices scientists use to explain the phenomenon of climate change. The collection of over 10 lessons brings Sensemaking to environmental science by cultivating student curiosity with engaging and eye-popping phenomena.

TAKEAWAYS:
Our Beautiful Planet is a series of compelling 5-7 minute science films and lessons highlighting the cutting-edge research that climate scientists are doing to solve some of the world’s most pressing issues.

SPEAKERS:
Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Approaches to Assessment and Grading that Support Student Sensemaking

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

As educators shift their teaching practice to align with the Framework for K-12 Science and the NGSS, they face various challenges and barriers. One pressing challenge is how to align their new approach to teaching and learning with existing assessment and grading systems. In this session, we will present provide examples of 3D assessments and associated scoring guidance. Participants will review student work for these sample assessments and identify evidence of understanding. They will collaborate with others in the session and determine how they would give grades based on set criteria. The second part of the session will highlight different approaches to grading based on local grading expectations (e.g., standards-based grading, daily grade requirements, or 100 point-based systems). Participants will leave the session with approaches to assessment and grading that support student sensemaking and honor the diverse resources students bring to the classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will leave the session with approaches to assessment and grading that support student sensemaking and honor the diverse resources students bring to the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Carlos, CA)

Phenomena to Questions: Practical Engagement Strategies for Student Sensemaking

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Phenomena to Questions .pdf

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Explore how to use phenomena to generate student questions that allow for further investigation to support student sensemaking.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to effectively use phenomena to allow for authentic student questioning and how to use those questions to increase student engagement and sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Nicole Vick (Northwestern University)

Self-Paced STEM and Equity for All Learners

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W181c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Self-Paced STEM and Equity for All Learners Slideshow

STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

Self-paced classrooms are a means to run a STEM class where the teacher becomes a facilitator of learning to their students. A self-paced classroom is one where the students will engage with the class material at a rate that is appropriate for them. Assignments are rated into different categories worth different point values so that students can make a choice each day in how they want to approach their learning. This kind of environment encourages development of executive functioning skills, cooperative learning skills, and other soft skills necessary to be successful as a 21st century learner, scientist, or engineer. It also meets the needs of both the highest and the lowest functioning learners. In this session, we will learn in more detail about self-paced classrooms, how to implement them, and how to develop different types of activities and locate resources that work well for this kind of environment, including interactive digital notebooks, pixel art, EdPuzzles, digital crossword puzzles, lab experiments, digital and live escape rooms, and more! Join me as we learn how we can make equity for all enjoyable for all the students.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to use various computer programs, specifically in the Google Suite, to create an equitable classroom environment.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Stewart-Miranda (Greater Lowell Technical High School: Tyngsboro, MA)

From CRISPR to 23 and Me: The Revolution in Human Genetics

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
From-23-and-Me-to-CRISPR
Slides from the presentation
Suggested Lesson Plans
Lesson Plans from the Presentation.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Techniques such as CRISPR, mitochondrial transfer, and mRNA therapeutics have opened up new possibilities for genetic manipulation, bringing new possibilities to energize the biology curriculum.

TAKEAWAYS:
We will explore the specifics of how these powerful genetic engineering techniques work and discuss ways to incorporate them into the curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
Kenneth Miller (Brown University: Providence, RI)

Energizing Your Achievement - Shell Teacher Awards

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Instructional Methods and Teaching Philosophy tips
Shell Awards Requirements
Shell Combined flyer 2022-23.pdf
Shell Programs presentation

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Come start your winning application for the Shell Science Teaching Award, or the Shell Urban Science Educators Development Award. We'll walk through the application step by step and you'll be able to begin your application or nomination form live.

TAKEAWAYS:
Collaborate with past winners and judges to learn how to start your winning application for the Shell Teaching Awards. We'll walk through the application step by step and you'll be able to begin your application or nomination form live.

SPEAKERS:
Amanda Upton (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Melissa Collins (John P. Freeman Optional School: Memphis, TN)

A Cancer Case Study Storyline and Research Lesson

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
A Cancer Storyline Landing Page
Quick access to resources.
A Cancer Storyline Slide Deck

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Enjoy conversation about our research lesson collaboration with the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center EYES (Educators and Youth Enjoy Science) teacher research experience.

TAKEAWAYS:
Authentic teacher research experiences can catalyze students' career interest, authentic classroom inquiry, curriculum development, and relevant professional learning.

SPEAKERS:
Steven Rogg (Notre Dame College Prep: Niles, IL), Pamela Wagner (George Westinghouse College Prep: Chicago, IL)

The Scoop on STEM Competitions Administered by NSTA

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W176a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA Competitions_ presentation.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Join us for a chance to learn more about  NSTA-administered competitions and awards from NSTA staff and past participants. NSTA-administered competitions include NSTA Teacher Awards, the Army Educational Outreach Program, Shell Science Lab Regional Challenge, and Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision competitions. This engaging hour will include discussion and tips on how to engage K–12 students in project-based learning opportunities that are no cost to participate.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Engage with educators that have participated in NSTA-administered competitions and awards; 2. Learn more about opportunities to engage students in project-based learning; and 3. Share best practices and tips to foster inquiry-based learning and showcase ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Acacia McKenna (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

#ScienceSaves: Lessons on how science has benefited humankind

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W183b


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

An introduction for teachers to free standards-based lessons focused on scientific breakthroughs and the positive role of science in our lives provided by #ScienceSaves.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Teachers will become familiar with free resources to teach how science has benefited human outcomes with lessons, including teacher notes with curriculum standards, student response sheets, rubrics, and lesson plans; 2. Lessons include a variety of topics from handwashing to CRISPR, and several are cross-curricular with Language Arts and Math; and 3. Various activities have students plot data, research topics such as medical inventions, design experiments, and design lifesaving inventions.

SPEAKERS:
Alison Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

Using Varied Assessments for Teaching Evolution

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

The Teacher Institute for Evolutionary Science (TIES) provides teachers with free and downloadable resources for an entire unit of instruction, including a variety of assessments.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. The units created by the Teacher Institute for Evolutionary Science (TIES) contain a variety of assessments, including online games, video questions, data analysis, puzzles, and formal assessments. The formal assessments include student response sheets and rubrics; 2. the TIES units can be easily downloaded for free and are focused on NGSS and state standards for evolution; and 3. the TIES units can be presented to a whole class or in small groups, or can be assigned to individual students. They can be teacher-guided or student-guided.

SPEAKERS:
Alison Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

Fueling Success for Students: Win Up to $15K for Your Students and School

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Shell Combined flyer 2022-23.pdf
Shell Science Lab Regional Challenge checklist
Shell Science Lab Regional Challenge w-awards - Chicago.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Do you impact your school and community with STEM? If you teach K–12, come learn how to apply to win up to $15K through this teacher competition.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to apply for the Shell-sponsored teacher competition and two Shell-sponsored teacher awards.

SPEAKERS:
Amanda Upton (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Ruth Ruud (Cleveland State University: Cleveland, OH)

NSTA/ISTA Session- Bridging the Gap: Connecting STEM/Science Learning in CTE

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Bridging the GAP

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Student understanding of how science and STEM ideas and concepts are applied within their chosen career pathway is a critical component of many Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs, but for a variety of reasons these connections are often overlooked. Some states even provide CTE courses and Career Pathway standards that seem to go against the three-dimensional and student-centered learning grain. Yet, to truly meet the vision of the K-12 Framework, students in CTE and Vocational Education pathways should also be provided opportunities to engage in three-dimensional sensemaking in the context of their CTE course. In this session, we explore explicit connections between three-dimensional science learning and Agricultural, Food and Natural Resources as just one example of how three-dimensional student learning and sensemaking can be incorporated into CTE. We then explore how similar strategies can be utilized in other pathways with the goal of bridging the gap between science learning and practical application for students in CTE.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn strategies for integrating scientific sensemaking into CTE courses to support their students' mastery of the scientific concepts they will apply in those fields.

SPEAKERS:
Bridina Lemmer (Illinois Science Teaching Association: Jacksonville, IL), Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)

Science Instruction in an Era of Accountability

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W187a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Activity Sheet
Jamboard

STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

An understanding of the structure of our educational system will allow us to better navigate this system in ways which promote social justice in the science classroom. Consequently, this session will start with a discussion of accountability reform initiatives (such as high-stakes testing) and the impact those mandates have had on science education. Thus, the first part of the session will focus on the interplay between reform initiatives and equity by examining how mandates worked to widen the achievement gap. The NGSS challenges states to make changes to their curricula and bring the focus back to science. We will then move to a discussion regarding how we can use the vision embodied in the NRC Framework to promote quality teaching practices in the science classroom and bring the focus to science instruction. Here we examine equity-driven practices that can work to promote social justice in the science classroom. Participants will identify components within the NCR Framework which promote equity by engaging all learners—specifically historically marginalized students—in the learning process.

TAKEAWAYS:
Accountability mandates such as high-stakes testing are working to funnel time and resources away from science instruction, however, 3D learning and inclusive practices can mitigate the effects of those mandates by promoting sound pedagogical practices.

SPEAKERS:
Klodia Saad (Dearborn Public Schools: Dearborn, MI)

Science Education in an Age of Misinformation

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W184d


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

We are living in an Age of Misinformation. Developing the capabilities to evaluate scientific information is a key goal of scientific literacy. Moreover, “obtaining, evaluating and communicating information” is a core practice of NGSS. The NGSS standards, however, were developed a decade ago before misinformation became so pervasive and were not developed to address this threat. Much of this misinformation is scientific. Therefore, this session will present a set of ideas and materials about how to address this challenge. These have emerged from a report developed at Stanford University drawing on the expertise of an international group of science educators, scientists and psychologists entitled “Science Education in an Age of Misinformation”. In this session, we will present the main arguments and recommendations of the report. Using a set of practical, web-based classroom examples, participants will work in small groups to trial and discuss the suggested teaching approaches and materials we have developed. Opportunities will be provided for feedback, questions and discussion in a final plenary. What we will present will empower teachers of science with ways they can support their students to avoid being misled by the purveyors of misinformation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn what are the challenges posed by misinformation and what they can do to help science education address this challenge using practical examples of exercises and ionnovative teaching materials.

SPEAKERS:
Daniel Pimentel (Stanford University: Stanford, CA)

Engaging with Your STEM Ecosystem Through After-School Programs: Lessons from Science Olympiad

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W179b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

A challenge that STEM education presents to educators is how to stay current in an ever-evolving field to accurately represent and engage their students with new topics, activities, and careers. Too often STEM teachers become locked-in on a set of topics, activities, and careers because of the resources and opportunities to which they have access. After-school programs, and their ability to foster partnerships within a school’s larger STEM ecosystem, are one mechanism to open up STEM programs within schools to new topics, activities, and careers while offering avenues for professional growth and learning for the classroom teacher. By introducing the Science Olympiad program and the strategies used by our school participants for over three decades to build partnerships, connect to their STEM ecosystem, and expand learning we intend to help attendees draw parallels to their STEM ecosystems and their after-school programs. Building off of this information, attendees will analyze and discuss ways their STEM ecosystem can contribute to their STEM program, develop approaches for asking ecosystem members for support, and recognize opportunities to grow their STEM program through after-school programs. The session will close with a discussion of attendees’ specific challenges and issues ensuring attendees leave with actionable solutions.

TAKEAWAYS:
The big takeaway from this session will attendees examining their STEM ecosystem to identify potential partners who align with their programming and can support student learning.

SPEAKERS:
John Loehr (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL)

Teaching Biology in a Time of Conflict—Challenge, Opportunity, and Optimism

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W181c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Covid Lesson Plans
Suggestions for lesson plans built around the biology of Covid-19
Teaching Science in a time of Conflict
Slides from the Presentation

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

These might seem to be grim times in the science classroom, but I will suggest in many ways that these are actually the “Best of Times.”

TAKEAWAYS:
The challenges we face present unique opportunities to engage students with topics of interest that are deeply relevant to their everyday lives. As a result, the challenges can be used to enhance student interest and teaching effectiveness.

SPEAKERS:
Kenneth Miller (Brown University: Providence, RI)

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way of doing the right thing

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175c


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way to engage the community in STEM. Participants will hear from educators that have won money for their school and communities to implement STEM action projects.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how they can receive cash awards and acknowledge for STEM action projects.

SPEAKERS:
John Anderson (Toshiba America Foundation: Irvine, CA)

Transforming Teaching Through Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Carnegie Corporation of New York released a challenge paper calling on the education field to transform teaching and learning through the elements and essentials of curriculum-based professional learning. Learn how schools and systems are helping teachers experience the instruction their students experience to help change instructional practices, leading to better student outcomes.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Explore the rationale for a challenge paper dedicated solely to the issue of curriculum-based professional learning; 2. Discover the 10 elements and three essentials of professional learning critical to effective implementation of high-quality science instructional materials; and 3. Consider implications of the roles and responsibilities for putting into action the elements of curriculum-based professional learning.

SPEAKERS:
Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Lights-Camera-CRASH: Exploring Crash Science with Griff Jones and the IIHS’s Vehicle Research Center

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W180


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Go behind the scenes of a crash-test center and use award-winning videos, paper car crashes, and egg drop cushions to teach motion and energy. Everything free at classroom.iihs.org.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to use inquiry-based, NGSS-focused activities and video-supported engineering design experiences integrating STEM concepts with vehicle crashworthiness and crash avoidance technologies to promote students' safer decision-making when riding in or driving a vehicle.

SPEAKERS:
Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

A River Story: Designing STEM Learning Experiences in an Equitable Context for Young Learners with Diverse Backgrounds

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W184b-c


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Dive into (equitable) three-dimensional learning and promote STEM teaching and sensemaking strategies that place equity at the center of learning, making science connections to local context.

TAKEAWAYS:
Explore how placing equity at the center of STEM education changed teacher attitudes about science teaching and learning, developed supportive networks for formal and informal educators to advance science education, created opportunities for teachers to desi