2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom, Literacy

 

15 results

Increasing Scientific Literacy: Strategies, Free Activities, and Resources That Work!

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W178a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Participants will learn strategies and receive numerous resources that increase students’ scientific literacy. The hands-on approach has participants engaged in the activities, games, and more.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will: 1. learn new strategies for incorporating scientific literacy into their lessons; and 2. receive numerous activities, templates, games, and other resources to help with doing this. These resources can be used “as is” or modified to allow for differentiation based on the needs of the learners. Strategies and resources will include ones effective with ELL and EC students.

SPEAKERS:
Iris Mudd (Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools: Winston Salem, NC)

Supporting Civically Engaged Argument Writing in Science and Technology Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W178b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Guided Session Notes and Resources

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Participants will use a graphic organizer to record their thinking as I describe a unit I taught in which students in grades 9-12 explored issues related to artificial intelligence. Students crafted op-Eds advocating for what we should do in our community about emerging technologies like driverless cars and facial recognition. As I describe the unit, I will highlight how I (1) kicked off the unit with a phenomenon that raised questions about convenience, safety, security, equity, and justice; (2) layered on texts and encouraged students to grapple with multiple perspectives on AI-related issues; (3) used routines and mentor texts to support students in crafting claims and connecting evidence to their claims; and (4) engaged students in processes of revision. Then, participants will work in self-selected groups to explore science/technology/society text sets on topics like lab grown meat and space debris. As they explore the text set, they will engage with a classroom routine to develop a compelling, debatable, defensible, and nuanced claim. Participants will share what they discovered as they explored the text set and wrote claims in their group and will reflect on how these text sets and routines might become part of their classroom practice.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about freely available text sets and classroom routines developed by teachers for supporting civically engaged argument writing about science and technology issues in society.

SPEAKERS:
John Smith (Chester A Arthur School: Philadelphia, PA)

Using Online Investigations with Digitized Specimens to Enhance Data Literacy and Scientific Reasoning

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
EPIC Bioscience - Data Interpretation Guide
Visual student guide to interpreting data patterns, with examples and non-examples.
EPIC Bioscience - Specimen Measurement Guide
A visual guide to measuring specimens, with examples and non-examples.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Online investigations with digitized specimens offer broad opportunities for teachers to engage their students in authentic scientific research. EPIC Bioscience investigations are free, online, NGSS-aligned research investigations that guide students to participate in science practices: asking a question, collecting data, analyzing and interpreting findings, and communicating to others. Investigations use specimens from natural history collections in entomology, vertebrate zoology, mycology, and botany to provide fully-supported, online investigations centered on real phenomena and aligned to NGSS MSLS2-1 through NGSS MSLS2-4. These investigations offer key opportunities to enhance scientific literacy through effective sensemaking with student-collected data on compelling specimens. This session focuses on two key goals to help teachers support sensemaking during phenomena-based student investigations: (1) Identifying and remediating common student errors and confusion during data collection and analysis. (2) Practicing effective instructional strategies focused on enhancing students’ scientific reasoning and data interpretation. This session will involve hands-on experiences with student activities, as well as interactive discussion of classroom examples and evidence.

TAKEAWAYS:
Identify common student errors and sources of confusion during data collection, analysis, and interpretation and deploy strategies designed to enhance student sensemaking from data.

SPEAKERS:
Kirsten Butcher (The University of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT), Madlyn Larson (Natural History Museum of Utah: Salt Lake City, UT)

Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

Using Climate Science Storylines to Anchor a High School Chemistry Class

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Come explore creative storylines for integrating up-to-date, research-driven climate science into high school Chemistry courses.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Climate-related storylines provide powerful frameworks for students to learn fundamental chemistry core ideas and reinforce understandings of crosscutting concepts and science and engineering practices; 2. The wealth of Earth-orbiting NASA satellite data now available in real time provides us with an unprecedented understanding of the science of climate change and also provides many opportunities for student experiential learning; and The latest advances in climate modeling can allow all students to both see the inequitable impacts that humans are currently having on Earth systems and build a sense of hope in how future changes in human practices can reverse current impact trends.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Wysession (Washington University in St. Louis: Saint Louis, MO)

Installation Science Exhibits as Assessment Options

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W187c


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

To help develop more scientifically curious and literate students, we use scientific literature or documentaries to engage students in developing the NGSS science practices. Students find an interesting topic, generate a question, collect and analyze data and then develop a Science Installation that communicates their learning to the greater community. Our most recent class project had students study how to grow food in a simulated Mars environment with the conditions controlled by student programmed raspberry pis. High school students organized 6th graders to do hands on data collection. They created a 10x12 foot exhibit that looked like a Martian landscape and highlighted the equipment they used with the plants still growing. The display included QR codes to communicate data and research using student-created videos, infographics, and data tables. Other installations include a monochromatic yellow room where everything looks grey and allowed observers to learn about the properties of light and the ways light energy is used in photosynthesis, the way it can be used to promote electrons, and the way it produces color. Other exhibits include sound waves and a history or music and musical instruments, the chemistry of color, and an environmental study of our use of carbon.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to guide students in the reading of scientific literature or the watching of documentaries in order to generate an authentic question and project. (How can we develop the capacity to farm on Mars? How does yellow monochromatic light produce the absence of color (an episode of Abstract, What can we learn about pollen structure from 3D printed files from Bayer’s agricultural division?) Participants will review a process to take the question and generate an authentic study that transcends a single class, grade, or discipline. (Students in 11th grade worked with students in 6th grade to test growing plants under controlled conditions that simulated Mars. Students in art and physics classes explored the properties of light and created a light-based art exhibit with science lessons on QR codes) Participants will explore a template for guiding students through the creation of an installation/exhibit that creatively shows the question, their experiment, their analysis, and potential solutions or conclusions in a creative and community-informing way. The exhibit is similar to an art installation with QR codes and experiment/study artifacts presented in a museum like scenario.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Helfant (Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School: Saint Louis, MO)

Exploring Energy Forms and Transformations in the Real World

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W185a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

NEED’s Science of Energy stations provide a hands-on approach to experimenting with objects used in student’s daily lives while incorporating scientific processing skills such as making observations, measuring, recording results, compare and contrast, categorize, make predictions, analyze and graph results, and draw conclusions. Workshop participants will rotate through six stations just as their students would in the classroom or OST Program, to learn about the different forms of energy and energy transformations using objects such as a toy car, apple, yo-yo, compass, bouncy ball, glow stick, etc. Using the same materials, the station guides can be easily differentiated for elementary, intermediate, and secondary levels. Each station includes a "What's Happening" article that provides additional informational text on the energy transformation that took place at the station and ties to more real-life examples for further visualization and understanding. The station guides have been correlated to each state’s individual science and math standards, as well as effectively support Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Workshop participants will engage in hands-on experiments just as their students would, using items we encounter in our daily lives that demonstrate energy forms and their transformations and applications to real-life examples for further visualization and understanding.

SPEAKERS:
Cori Nelson (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA)

Using the Scientific Process to Conquer Smallpox

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W196a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

We can examine natural phenomena and address wicked problems using the scientific process. The smallpox virus emerged approximately 10,000 years ago, and the virus's global spread devastated civilizations. Thanks to the scientific thinking of a Buddhist nun, a milkmaid, and Edward Jenner, smallpox was declared eradicated in 1979 by the World Health Organization. To support the understanding of the nature of science in the NGSS (Appendix H), session participants will engage in activities that demonstrate how science is used to answer questions about the natural world through a process that is consistent, observational, natural, predictable, tentative, and testable. Additionally, participants will examine various media sources to learn how to identify scientific misinformation and the tactics used to make misinformation appear credible. The National Center for Science Education supports science teachers through free professional development and curriculum to recognize and address science misconceptions using the three dimensions of the NGSS. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
This session introduces participants to a basic understanding of the scientific process, how our knowledge of the natural world evolves with new evidence, and that science cannot answer questions that do not pertain to natural processes. Attendees will take a deep dive into an NGSS storyline sequence developed to help students understand that science is an ongoing process that must be supported by multiple lines of evidence to be accepted by the scientific community.

SPEAKERS:
Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), DeeDee Wright (Colorado State University: Fort Collins, CO), Cari Herndon (National Center for Science Education: No City, No State), Ayesha Alirahi (Science Teacher: , 0), Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Why Are They Not Curious Anymore?

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Why Are They Not Curious Anymore.pptx
PowerPoint slides presented during the conference, with speaker notes.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Sagan said that when kids are young, they cannot stop asking questions. By high school, they stop asking. This needs to change.

TAKEAWAYS:
Ways we can help students learn and retain science concepts, critical-thinking skills, and inquisitiveness using alternative approaches to teaching.

SPEAKERS:
Juan Bacigalupi (Eagle Hill School: Hardwick, MA)

Inoculating Against Science Denial

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Too many students fall for disinformation. Learning facts is not enough. New research shows students need more critical-thinking skills, and supplemental curriculum helps.

TAKEAWAYS:
Critical-thinking curriculum is available to help “inoculate” students against disinformation and science denial.

SPEAKERS:
David Hundsness (Critical Thinking Project: PACIFICA, CA)

Digging Deeper into the Data with an Adapted CER Framework

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

This session focuses on improved outcomes for students’ written science explanations when including data description prompts and instructional facilitation to adapt the CER framework.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn about the importance of a preliminary step of incorporating data descriptions when utilizing the CER framework to guide students’ written explanations and reasoning of data visualization.

SPEAKERS:
Andrea Drewes (Rider University: Lawrenceville, NJ)

Using Earth and Space Science Storylines to Anchor a High School Physics Class

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Let's explore creative storylines for integrating up-to-date, research-driven Earth and space science into high school physics courses.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Earth and space science storylines provide engaging avenues for students to learn fundamental physics core ideas and reinforce understandings of both crosscutting concepts and science and engineering practices; 2. Most of the classical physics curriculum originated within fields of Earth and space science, so aspects of geophysics integrate naturally within a modern high school physics curriculum; and 3. For most high schools, aligning a high school curriculum with the NGSS requires the addition of a substantial amount of Earth and space science, and integrating relevant geophysical content into a high school course can help do this.

SPEAKERS:
Michael Wysession (Washington University in St. Louis: Saint Louis, MO)

Climate, COVID, Conspiracy, and Classrooms: Supporting scientific literacy by fighting science denialism

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W186b


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Science denial, anti-intellectualism, and conspiracy theories have long, sordid histories. Today, rampant science denialism threatens personal and public health, economic sustainability, and prosperity. Globally, it poses existential threats to humanity. How has the situation deteriorated so far? How can so many people deny, not only the reality of climate change - a slow-moving and invisible enemy - but also the reality of a global pandemic and the effectiveness of simple protective/preventive strategies? The explanation is straightforward. Widespread scientific illiteracy enables moneyed and/or politically powerful interests to manipulate a credulous public in ways that undermine understanding of science and generate distrust of the scientific community. Campaigns often waged on unregulated social media are disturbingly effective. When disinformation, willful ignorance, and belligerence strike, who's on call? Right now, almost nobody ... and that's a problem for all of us who, as science educators, understand and value the role of science in general, and STEM topics and approaches more specifically. We will then explore a variety of online resources and discuss individualized teaching strategies that educators can deploy to overcome these challenges in our classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
This workshop will briefly review the history, driving forces behind, and current status of science denialism, to clarify what we are up against. We will then explore online resources and individualized teaching strategies that can overcome these challenges in our classrooms. No single "magic bullet" (or magic YouTube video) can rescue us. We need a full-court press by all of us in education, focusing on cultivating in our students a true understanding of the nature of science, appreciation for the value of expertise in STEM fields, and a willingness to engage on a personal level with disturbingly cult-like beliefs.

SPEAKERS:
Joseph Levine (Science Writer and Producer: Concord, MA)

Science Education in an Age of Misinformation

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W184d


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

We are living in an Age of Misinformation. Developing the capabilities to evaluate scientific information is a key goal of scientific literacy. Moreover, “obtaining, evaluating and communicating information” is a core practice of NGSS. The NGSS standards, however, were developed a decade ago before misinformation became so pervasive and were not developed to address this threat. Much of this misinformation is scientific. Therefore, this session will present a set of ideas and materials about how to address this challenge. These have emerged from a report developed at Stanford University drawing on the expertise of an international group of science educators, scientists and psychologists entitled “Science Education in an Age of Misinformation”. In this session, we will present the main arguments and recommendations of the report. Using a set of practical, web-based classroom examples, participants will work in small groups to trial and discuss the suggested teaching approaches and materials we have developed. Opportunities will be provided for feedback, questions and discussion in a final plenary. What we will present will empower teachers of science with ways they can support their students to avoid being misled by the purveyors of misinformation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn what are the challenges posed by misinformation and what they can do to help science education address this challenge using practical examples of exercises and ionnovative teaching materials.

SPEAKERS:
Daniel Pimentel (Stanford University: Stanford, CA)

Building Science Literacy Skills Using Primary Sources

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Explore the use of primary sources to support three-dimensional science learning during an interactive presentation of examples, resources, and ideas for your own lesson plan.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn what primary sources are in science, why primary sources support acquisition of science literacy skills, and how to integrate primary sources into science and STEM lessons.

SPEAKERS:
Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ), Donna Governor (University of North Georgia: Dahlonega, GA), Kathy Biernat (Educational Consultant: Franklin, WI)