2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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Pathway/Course

FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Hands-On Workshop, Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom, STEM

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
8 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Lone Wolf: A Darwinian Speculative Thought Experiment

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W186a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Come join us as we participate in a Darwinian speculation reimagined as a Thought Experiment. This is a classic STEAM approach.

TAKEAWAYS:
See how to integrate the arts into STEM = STEAM.

SPEAKERS:
Christina Derusha (Science Teacher: , IL), Vito Dipinto (National Louis University at Wheeling: Wheeling, IL)

GMOs what do you know breakout

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Participants will organize in groups and receive clues and puzzles to learn about genetic modification then be tasked to “break out” unlocking BreakoutEDU boxes. Puzzles include myths and facts; GMO or not?; Misleading label; and general terms related to genetics, and recombinant DNA. This activity could be used as review of genetics concepts or as a way to engage learners in research about genetically modified organisms. Free curriculum is available from grownextgen.org.

TAKEAWAYS:
Dispelling many of the myths about genetically engineered crops. An engaging way to involve every student in the process of problem-solving. Introduction to more resources about the connection between agriculture and science concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Jane Hunt (Nourish the Future - Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

Science in Action: Updating the Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project Educators’ Guide

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W181a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Guide to NOAAs MDMAP for Educators (DRAFT ONLY)
Presentation Slides

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Marine debris is a widespread pollution problem in our ocean and waterways. It can harm wildlife, habitats, and our economy. This issue is human-caused, but it also has human solutions. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Debris Program is dedicated to better understanding and preventing marine debris and its impacts on our environment. One of the best tools we have to combat marine debris is understanding the distribution, abundance, and types of debris in the marine environment. The Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project (MDMAP) is a NOAA citizen science initiative to survey and record marine debris on shorelines. By participating in the MDMAP, students can generate critical data on marine debris for use by community organizations, policymakers, researchers, and NOAA. MDMAP data can also support student-generated action projects, providing opportunities to plan and implement authentic changemaking efforts. The NOAA Marine Debris Program plans to demonstrate and solicit feedback on an updated tool to support implementation of the MDMAP protocols with students: The MDMAP Educators’ Guide (Guide). We will introduce the updated protocols, provide a demonstration of activities in the Guide, and engage in a discussion with educators about implementation, suggested extensions (including action projects), and feedback.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees at this session will learn about the updated Marine Debris Monitoring & Assessment Project Educators’ Guide: a refreshed citizen science tool for monitoring shoreline marine debris available from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, including planning and conducting protocols with students, working with survey data, and creating authentic, meaningful action projects for students based on their experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Alexandria Brake (NOAA Office of Education: Silver Spring, MD), Tanya Kea-Marie Torres (California Sea Grant Marine Debris Extension Fellow: , CA)

Uncovering Student Misconceptions About Mathematical Models

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W194a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Uncovering Student Misconceptions About Mathematical Models (1).pdf

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Students come into a science classroom with varying or little to no background knowledge. Mathematical modeling in the science classroom is a critical piece of any three-dimensional lesson. Come learn how one science teacher uses real-world student-collected data to make modeling fun and inclusive of all students!

TAKEAWAYS:
Equity in the science/math classroom; data collection and analysis; and mathematical modeling.

SPEAKERS:
Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Crash Science Inquiry: Investigating Distracted Driving Dangers

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Complete a distracted driving simulation and discover free award-winning videos, STEM activities, and real-world applications exploring science, engineering, and vehicle crashworthiness. Free lesson plans included.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how scientific and engineering principles can be modeled in classrooms using crash science–related videos and activities to promote safer personal behaviors when riding in or driving a vehicle.

SPEAKERS:
Griff Jones (University of Florida: No City, No State), Pini Kalnite (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Highway Loss Data Institute: Arlington, VA)

Transformative Science Education: Enrich Your Students’ Lives with Science

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W193a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Unfortunately, the Las Vegas slogan “What Happens Here Stays Here” applies all too well to science classrooms. Science learning that takes place in the classroom often stays in the classroom and fails to transform students’ perceiving and experiencing of the world. This gap between school learning and everyday experience is one of the key barriers to developing active scientific literacy. This workshop on the Teaching for Transformative Experiences in Science (TTES) model will help teachers address this problem by enacting transformative teaching. The TTES model is a research-based pedagogy for fostering transformative experiences; that is, experiences in which students use science content to enrich and expand their everyday lives. The workshop will train teachers in the application of three core design principles: (a) artistic selection and crafting of content, (b) experiential apprenticeship, and (c) doing and undergoing. The workshop will be conducted by one of the pioneers and lead researchers of transformative experience theory. It will include authentic classroom vignettes illustrating the design principles in action, application templates and guidelines, and exercises that will help participants master the design principles. The workshop is appropriate for science educators at all levels as the design principles are adaptable to all ages.

TAKEAWAYS:
Workshop participants will receive hands-on training in research-based strategies effective at fostering transformative experiences; that is, experiences in which students use their in-school learning to enrich and expand their everyday, out-of-school lives.

SPEAKERS:
Kevin Pugh (University of Northern Colorado: Greeley, CO)

How to create a simple bioinformatics activity that connects to your current science curricula.

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W193b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Bringing bioinformatics into the science classroom.pdf
Electronic version of the worksheet used during the Workshop Session
How to Create a Simple Bioinformatics Activity - NSTA Chicago 22.pdf
Presentation Slides for the Workshop Session on Creating a Simple Bioinformatics Acitivity

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Advances in biotechnology, particularly DNA sequencing, has led to a surge in genetic data and large online databases. Interpreting these data, using the interdisciplinary field of bioinformatics, is in high demand because genome sequencing is becoming increasingly cheaper and faster. In science classrooms, there are many opportunities to incorporate bioinformatics, but this can be a daunting task for teachers who do not know where to begin. This hands-on activity starts by introducing participants to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) website. Presenters will provide a brief overview of the database to guide participants on: 1) how to use the search functions of the database, 2) interpret information on sequence pages, and 3) how to download DNA, RNA or amino acid sequences. Following the guided tour, small groups will be provided discussion questions to discover potential areas within their curricula that could be reinforced or enhanced with a brief bioinformatics activity. Participants will be provided worksheets to help document relevant sequence information (accession numbers) for the biological phenomenon or topic that inspired the activity. The participants will leave with a basic understanding of sequence capture from NCBI and a rudimentary activity to expose students to sequence data analysis.

TAKEAWAYS:
An understanding of the genetic code and basic internet browsing skills are all that are needed to explore bioinformatics and use them in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Zack Bateson (National Agricultural Genotyping Center: Fargo, ND), Jane Hunt (Nourish the Future - Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH)

A Unique and Challenging Ice Core Investigation that Integrates the Three Dimensions of NGSS & STEM

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
A JS9 Image Analysis Analysis Investigation
This JS9 investigation is an excellent extension for the Ice Core Activity to help determine the date of the Cas A supernova event.
Ice Core Records Investigation Student Handout
Ice Core Records Presentation
Ice Core Records.pdf
Ice Core Webinar for Educators
Jamboard Online Version of Ice Core Records
This version makes it easier for groups to work together individually and in a group to share their progress.
The Ice Core Records Investigation from the Earth Scientist Magazine
This article provides an overview of the Ice Core Materials for Educators.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

The GISP2 H-Core was collected in 1992 adjacent to the Greenland Ice Sheet Project Two (GISP2) drill site. The GISP2-H 125.6-meter firm and ice core is a record of 430 years of liquid electrical conductivity and nitrate concentrations. The liquid electrical conductivity sequence contains signals from a number of known volcanic eruptions that provide a dating system at specific locations along the core. The terrestrial and solar background nitrate records show seasonal and annual variations – as well as unique events. Several major nitrate anomalies within the record do not correspond to any known terrestrial or solar events, and there is compelling evidence that some nitrate anomalies within the GISP2 H-Core could possibly be a record of supernova events. This investigation provides participants with a better understanding of the scientific process of analyzing data and developing models to construct knowledge, and defending the results. Sometimes there is no answer key, only possible solutions from analyzing and constructing knowledge from multiple sources that cross traditional disciplines. The materials focus on NGSS scientific practices, crosscutting concepts and the Earth and space sciences core disciplinary ideas – including analyzing and interpreting data, patterns, cycles of energy and matter, Earth systems and Earth and human activity.

TAKEAWAYS:
In constructing new knowledge, sometimes there is no definitive answer, only plausible conclusions based on constructing, analyzing, and comparing data and research from multiple disciplines.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Young (NASA/NSO/UoL Program Manager: Laughlin, NV)

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