2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom, Sensemaking

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
8 results
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Now I see it! Now I get it!

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W184d


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Without out a doubt the recent pandemic has demonstrated that, the efforts in the science classroom towards scientific literacy are more relevant than ever. In this session participants will learn simple effective visual literacy tools and strategies that make learning science visible to all students, supporting diversity and reinforcing scientific literacy skills that help students make sense of the world. The strategies and tools used in this presentation will highlight the need to incorporate visual literacy as current brain research shows that around 60% of information we process every day comes in visual form. Sometimes chunking content to smaller learning bites can lower the understanding of concepts and ideas, especially if these concepts are abstract in nature; learning how to maximize the use of visuals both student and teacher made supports deeper understanding not just on a particular concept but of how they are connected making sense of the world. These strategies support cultural competency as they support learner diversity while working on scientific literacy skills such as use of evidence/data, pose questions, find answers. By having a common visual as point of reference along with strategy and tools not only closes the gap on background knowledge and makes accessible to all students but also helps student and teachers have meaningful discourse highlighting students strengths to solve real world problems.

TAKEAWAYS:
In this session participants will learn simple effective visual literacy tools and strategies that make learning science visible to all students, supporting diversity and reinforcing scientific literacy skills that help students make sense of the world.

SPEAKERS:
Marjorie Miles Dozier (Polk County Public Schools: Bartow, FL)

Matter and Energy Learning Progressions in OpenSciEd High School Chemistry

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W196c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA Chicago 2022 Chemistry Progressions.pdf

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

The forthcoming OpenSciEd High School chemistry course combines physical science and Earth and space science NGSS performance expectations as a way to engage students in developing understandings around energy and matter. Learn about the focus of the five units that make up this course and their associated performance expectation bundles to see how the three dimensions are used as a way to authentically engage students in making sense of both physical science and earth and space science related phenomena and design solutions. In the session, we will highlight how anchoring phenomena of the first unit, typically associated with earth and space science, helps students make sense of the particulate nature of matter, energy transfers in earth systems, feedback loops, and human interactions with their environment. An in-depth examination of the performance expectation bundles for the following four units will help illustrate the learning progressions students will follow to develop progressively more complex models of the particle nature of matter, its properties, and its interactions using the lenses of all crosscutting concepts, in particular, patterns, energy and matter, structure and function, and stability and change.

TAKEAWAYS:
Incorporation of earth and space science NGSS performance expectations within a chemistry curriculum supports student engagement in and sensemaking of chemistry concepts around properties and interactions of matter and energy.

SPEAKERS:
Nicole Vick (Northwestern University), Dan Voss (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Tara McGill (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL)

Using the Scientific Process to Conquer Smallpox

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W196a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

We can examine natural phenomena and address wicked problems using the scientific process. The smallpox virus emerged approximately 10,000 years ago, and the virus's global spread devastated civilizations. Thanks to the scientific thinking of a Buddhist nun, a milkmaid, and Edward Jenner, smallpox was declared eradicated in 1979 by the World Health Organization. To support the understanding of the nature of science in the NGSS (Appendix H), session participants will engage in activities that demonstrate how science is used to answer questions about the natural world through a process that is consistent, observational, natural, predictable, tentative, and testable. Additionally, participants will examine various media sources to learn how to identify scientific misinformation and the tactics used to make misinformation appear credible. The National Center for Science Education supports science teachers through free professional development and curriculum to recognize and address science misconceptions using the three dimensions of the NGSS. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
This session introduces participants to a basic understanding of the scientific process, how our knowledge of the natural world evolves with new evidence, and that science cannot answer questions that do not pertain to natural processes. Attendees will take a deep dive into an NGSS storyline sequence developed to help students understand that science is an ongoing process that must be supported by multiple lines of evidence to be accepted by the scientific community.

SPEAKERS:
Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), DeeDee Wright (Colorado State University: Fort Collins, CO), Cari Herndon (National Center for Science Education: No City, No State), Ayesha Alirahi (Science Teacher), Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Rise of the Mutant Weed: Using DNA Analysis Tools to Identify Mutations that create Superweeds.

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 9


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

This workshop demystifies bioinformatics using free online tools. The activity explains the mechanisms behind herbicide resistance and genetic changes that help weeds avoid chemical control.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will see a real-world example of artificial selection in action, while also increasing the awareness of free bioinformatics tools available for everyone to compare and analyze DNA sequences.

SPEAKERS:
Jane Hunt (Nourish the Future - Education Projects, LLC: Columbus, OH), Zack Bateson (National Agricultural Genotyping Center: Fargo, ND)

Understanding the Importance of Climate Modeling

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

A scientific model represents the cause and effect relationships between components of a system attempting to replicate the system in such a way as to be predictive. Models are necessary when the studied system is too complex to isolate each component and test variables and their impact on the whole system. Climate is a highly complex system, but modeling allows climate scientists to identify the variables within the system and study each of them independently and as a system. The evolution of video game graphics and consoles mirrors the evolution of models used to replicate Earth’s climate. To support the understanding of NGSS HS-ESS2: Earth’s Systems and HS-ESS3: Earth and Human Activity, session participants will analyze data from different factors affecting climate and average global temperatures. Ultimately, data shows the rapid increase of greenhouse gases due to human activity. Additionally, participants will examine various climate models focusing on the factors included in building the model and communicate their findings by creating their model. The National Center for Science Education supports science teachers through free professional development and curriculum to recognize and address science misconceptions using the three dimensions of the NGSS. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
Scientists use models to understand highly complex systems and make predictions about future outcomes. Climate scientists use multiple data sources to design and test comprehensive climate models to examine past climates and predict future trends. Attendees will learn about the history and evolution of climate modeling while examining evidence that supports their reliability for predicting future climate patterns.

SPEAKERS:
Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), DeeDee Wright (Colorado State University: Fort Collins, CO), Cari Herndon (National Center for Science Education: No City, No State), Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Good is Good Enough? Linking the Evolution of Horses and Environmental Change

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W196a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Horses have an extraordinary fossil record in North America, with specimens from the early Eocene (about 55 Ma) to just the last 10,000 years. The primary dietary strategy in horses changed from browsing –- like that of a giraffe –-to grazing –- like that of modern horses, as seen in the evolution of the higher-crowned teeth. The evolution of tooth structure strongly correlates to variations in the ecosystem due to a changing climate. To support the understanding of NGSS HS-LS4 Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity, session participants will engage in the analysis of hypsodonty -- the height of the tooth relative to its overall size -- of fossil replicas to track the evolution of dietary strategy in this lineage to construct an explanation based on evidence to support the claim that changes in environmental conditions may result in the emergence of new species over time. Additionally, participants will communicate their newly gained knowledge in analyzing how horse evolution is depicted in museum displays and design an accurate phylogenetic representation. The National Center for Science Education supports science teachers through free professional development and curriculum to recognize and address science misconceptions using the three dimensions of the NGSS. Resources: https://ncse.ngo/supporting-teachers/classroom-resources

TAKEAWAYS:
Natural selection acts on genetic variation within populations as individuals who are adapted to survive in the environment reproduce and pass on their genes. Attendees will have the opportunity to work hands-on with a variety of 3D-printed horse teeth dating back to the Eocene to understand how a changing climate played a role in the dietary evolution of horses.

SPEAKERS:
Lin Andrews (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA), DeeDee Wright (Colorado State University: Fort Collins, CO), Cari Herndon (National Center for Science Education: No City, No State), Blake Touchet (National Center for Science Education: Oakland, CA)

Science Practices in Action: Video Case Studies of Science Practices of Questioning and Modeling

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W180


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Our master teacher video case studies are used to facilitate discussion about the science practices of Asking Questions and Modeling with inservice and preservice teachers.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Using classroom video as a focus of discussion can provide teachers with an avenue for substantive conversations about their teaching practice; 2. Our case studies present real classroom settings where the teachers are having their students work on the practice of questioning and/ or modeling; and 3. Participants will view the videos and reflect on how the teachers are facilitating the use of science practices in their classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
David Henry (SUNY Buffalo State College: Buffalo, NY), Alayla Ende (University at Buffalo, SUNY: Buffalo, NY), Lisa Brosnick (SUNY Buffalo State College: Buffalo, NY), Alan Baczkiewicz (Sweet Home Middle School: Amherst, NY)

Budburst Community Science: Observing Plants in a Changing World

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Budburst Overview for Educators
Plants in A Changing World Presentation Slides
Using the Budburst Mobile App.pdf

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Budburst is a national community science project that brings together researchers, educators, gardeners, and community scientists to make careful observations of the timing of plant life cycle events, or phenophases. Changes over time can be used to illustrate how plants and ecosystems are being affected by human impacts on the environment, especially climate change. By joining Budburst, students can connect to nature wherever they live while participating in an authentic scientific investigation with real-world impacts. In this session educators will learn how they can use Budburst to engage their students in collecting and using real scientific data to examine local plant phenomena and address the NGSS. They will learn about the resources freely available to educators on the Budburst website, including tools allowing them to (1) create their own virtual classroom and set up student accounts, (2) collect and submit data with students, and (3) access existing data to help students ask and analyze their own questions about plants, ecosystems, and climate change. Finally, participants will learn how other educators have implemented Budburst in their classrooms and explore how they can use this flexible platform to scaffold their students’ participation in different stages of the scientific process.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn to engage students in local plant phenomena and real-world climate change science using Budburst resources.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Jones (Chicago Botanic Garden: Glencoe, IL), Rebecca Ammann (Chicago Botanic Garden: Glencoe, IL)

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