2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

Grade Level


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Pathway/Course

FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Hands-On Workshop, No Strand

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
29 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Dog Mode Design Challenge

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dog Mode Slide Deck

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Introducing students to real-world engineering problems is a key component to engaging them in the science classroom. In this project, students solve the problem of saving pets from a hot car. Many students are aware of this issue and would have many ideas on how this could be achieved. This projects gives them the tools to help solve such a problem by building a model and finding a solution. Participants in this session will get to build the model themselves to see how information from sensors (input) can determine what should be done (output) through simple lines of code. No coding or engineering experience is needed, just imagination and logical thinking. Projects like these can expose students to STEM Careers. The exposure to coding and engineering design can also get them interested in doing more in the STEM field.

TAKEAWAYS:
Solve a real-work problem with coding and engineering design - no prior experience needed.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Engineering Severe Weather Solutions

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Sever Weather Slide Deck

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Human activities have caused changes in global temperature and weather patterns. This generation of students will need to understand climate science in order to adapt to this changing environment. In this session, participants will explore a project in which students incorporate engineering and basic coding - no experience necessary. We will use micro:bit technology to connect basic coding commands to collect authentic data using embedded sensors. Participants will use this collected data to modify design solutions based on human vulnerabilities to severe weather. Participants will find ways to expose their students to the engineering capabilities needed to solve problems. This project allows students to compare design solutions to identify which is best for the problem at hand and experience the interactive process of evaluating solutions. This project allows for the authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Use technology to expose students to coding and engineering design solutions for severe weather.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Hands-on with Climate Science!

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W175c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Students may commonly hear the terms carbon dioxide, greenhouse gases, global warming, and climate change. It is important to understand climate science and climate change, and how energy use and consumer choices impact our environment, economics, and standard of living. Session participants will learn hands-on activities to use with their students to develop a better understanding of climate science. They will first explore NEED’s Greenhouse in a Beaker to observe how greenhouse gases, like CO2, act in our atmosphere through the use of common lab equipment. Can I Really Fry and Egg on the Sidewalk uses an infrared thermometer to showcase how radiant energy is absorbed by various surfaces at different rates and be able to see how different surfaces and the spaces surrounding them can have elevated temperatures, leading to a heat island effect. Road Trip involves calculating the carbon impact of transportation choices to learn about their carbon footprint.

SPEAKERS:
Cori Nelson (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA), Sharon Bird (The NEED Project: Manassas, VA)

What Is Sensemaking? Exploration and Consensus-Building Tasks for Individuals and Teams

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Join us to learn what sensemaking is and how to use research-based resources to engage students in making sense of the world around them. Leave with a collection of resources to move your professional learning forward no matter where you are on the sensemaking continuum.

TAKEAWAYS:
Develop an understanding of what sensemaking is and how it can help build classrooms where students are able to make sense of the world around them. Leaders walk away with a consensus-building exercise for their team.

SPEAKERS:
Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Elizabeth Allan (University of Central Oklahoma: Edmond, OK)

Surfacing and Addressing the Challenges of Three-Dimensional Science through Transformational Coaching

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W181c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This hands-on workshop will showcase the transformational coaching method in order to shift science instructional practice by addressing the following questions: - What challenges do science teachers face when implementing NGSS? - How can we coach for change? - What tools do we use when coaching? - What does this look like in a coaching conversation? In this session, we will discuss common challenges faced by teachers when implementing NGSS and we will introduce Elena Aguilar’s transformational coaching model of coaching around teaching beliefs as a means to surface and address these challenges. Participants will learn about and discuss both coaching and NGSS tools that support the coaching process. Participants will then view a recording of a coaching session with a science teacher. While watching the video, they will use the tools discussed earlier in the session to determine how the coach surfaced the challenge and what tools were used to move the teacher toward successful practice. Then participants will have the opportunity to practice coaching each other in coaching triads using scenarios of NGSS implementation challenges. Lastly, participants will have an opportunity to reflect and debrief on the successes and difficulties they experienced in their coaching triads.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will walk away with specific strategies and tools on how to move science teachers forward on the NGSS three-dimensional continuum through transformational coaching.

SPEAKERS:
Anna Kraftson (Naperville North High School: Naperville, IL)

Dumpster Dive with STEM

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dumpster Dive With STEM Participant Folder

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Connect the human impact of trash pollution to engineering design. Get your students thinking critically and creatively as they collaborate in real-world problem-solving. The global real-world issue of human-generated trash polluting local bodies of water is the main focus of this hands-on session. Using our partnership with the Howard County Conservancy, our students learn about their local watersheds and contribute to a Watershed Report Card. Students see how trash that is often found on our local schoolyards can affect our watershed, and they design a working model for trash removal in a local tributary. Basic coding will be used to design programs that will control sensors and motors through a microcontroller, thus removing the trash from the water source. The model will utilize solar and water power to move the trash into a separate receptacle. Various sensors will also be used to monitor water levels and determine the outcome of the program. This session will allow participants to find ways to increase the environmental stewardship of their students while incorporating engineering design into the science classroom. This project allows authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Design a project that enhances STEM skills in students such as collaboration, curiosity and creative problem solving.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Meet Me in the Middle, Lite: A Share-a-Thon

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
UIC Teacher Fellows Info
Informational Flyer on Teacher Fellows program to develop classroom learning companion robots

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Engage in a variety of activities, collect information and resources, and network with middle level leaders. Discover new ideas and materials that you can use next week.

TAKEAWAYS:
The participants will network with other middle level science educators and leaders to discover and engage in activities that will expand their knowledge and be usable in all aspects of their work.

SPEAKERS:
Mary Lou Lipscomb (National Middle Level Science Teachers Association: Naperville, IL), Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Carey Dieleman (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ), Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA), Suzanne Cunningham (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN), Katy Garvey (The Source for Learning, Inc.: Reston, VA), Nicole Green (Animalearn: Jenkintown, PA), Joseph Michaelis (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Kim Nagle (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Anne Schoeffler (Seton Catholic School: Hudson, OH), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Corydon Strawser (Lake Nona Middle School: Orlando, FL), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA), Barbara Phillips-Bredlow (Northeast Nodaway School District: Ravenwood, MO), Dawn Konieczny (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Erin Towns (Edward Little High School: Auburn, ME)

Putting the A into STEM

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The main goal of this presentation is to help teachers enhance curriculum choices that enrich students lives by integrating the visual arts with environmental science and conservation concerns that allow students to make real world global connections. Leonardo DiVinici is best know for painting the Mona Lisa, but did you know that he also kept nearly 13,000 pages of notes that fuse together art, nature and the physical universe? This professional development session will be centered around how you can incroporate conservation education practices as well as different art techniques into your science lessons that will engage all students.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will take away easy art techniques that can be incorporated in science lessons as well has how to add conservation education into their curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
Jackie Halsey (Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium: Omaha, NE)

How Argument-Driven Inquiry Can Make Learning Experiences More Meaningful, Rigorous, and Equitable

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session introduces a way to create learning experiences that are meaningful, rigorous, and equitable for students. Participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS.

TAKEAWAYS:
The characteristics of learning experiences that are meaningful, relevant, and equitable for students and how to give students an opportunity to use their own ideas along with the DCIs, CCs, and SEPs in the service of sensemaking during these experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

What the Flip? Where to Start When Flipping Your Classroom.

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W193b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
What the Flip handout.docx
What the flip.pptx

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Participants should come to this session with some ideas/dreams in mind of how they would like their classroom to look. Discussion will get the program rolling. A presentation will be given with some ideas as to a starting point to flipping the classroom as well as some key ideas to making the class time meaningful. Simply taking lecture out of the classroom and inserting worksheets will NOT make flipping a worthwhile experience. Having more time to get students to participate in meaningful learning experiences will make the effort worth it. Plus, it involves less instructor effort in the long run as students are doing most of the work. Participants will be given time to work independently or in groups to come up with ideas as to how to modify historically "typical" science lessons into ones that are more engaging, meet students where they are at, and increase student understanding of key science principles. Presenter will give feedback on ideas. Question and answer time will be provided as well. Sometimes, all it takes is a starting point in order to reinvent one's teaching style and reinvigorate one's passion for teaching.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants who have been wanting to flip their classroom, but don't know where to start will learn basic strategies to incorporate into their classroom to get students doing meaningful learning activities.

SPEAKERS:
Meredith Diehl (Northview High School: Sylvania, OH)

Beyond the Chocolates! Using grants to fund your classroom projects.

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Beyond the Chocolates
Grant writing for educators.
Beyond the Chocolates- Grant Writing for Educators
Beyond the Chocolates- Grant Writing for Educators

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The objective of this workshop is to guide educators through a mock grant-writing process. We will begin the session by discussing the grant process from proposal requests to awards. We will discuss misconceptions such as tax-exempt status requirements, time constraints, deliverables, project impact, collaboration, and more. Participants will have the opportunity to go through the process by searching for grants and completing a mock proposal. They will be provided with “step by step” guides to help them design a project, clarify their project objectives, create a budget, and determine the impact for their students, schools, and community. Participants will present their proposals and provide peer-to-peer feedback during the discussion part of the session.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to write a grant proposal for a classroom project.

SPEAKERS:
Emilia Odife (Lake Mary Preparatory School: Lake Mary, FL)

The Egg Drop Meets 2020

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Participants will design and test a vessel that will land an egg dropped from a substantial heights without breaking the egg. Participants will use a variety of materials to provide the softest landing possible. Participants will employ technology to assist them in designing their vessels and shape their final methods.

TAKEAWAYS:
Design and test an egg vessel with real time data. Analyze live data to better design a successful egg drop vessel. Experience the engineering design process. - Using technology to test prototypes. -employing the engineering design process. -applying modern technology to past challenges.

SPEAKERS:
Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY), Todd Graba (Crystal Lake South High School: Crystal Lake, IL)

3-D Learning for a Sustainable World

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W196a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Three-dimensional learning, as outlined by NGSS, allows students to view science as an interrelated world of inquiry. Today’s environmental challenges require a 3-D approach to understand the phenomena and data and how our landscapes and ecosystems have changed as human population has doubled in the past 50 years. In this hands-on session, the presenter will lead participants in hands-on activities (problem-solving challenges, simulations and modeling) that use real-world data sets and 3-D learning in a variety of formats to analyze and think critically about some of the key ecological topics in Biology and Environmental Science courses (including AP) – population trends, climate change, land use, biodiversity, and ecosystem health. Presented activities emphasize students’ ability to collect, analyze and interpret data as central to developing and using models, identifying patterns and designing solutions. The presenter will also share interactive digital tools for engaging students remotely. The presenter will discuss how to implement these activities as part of broadening students’ understanding of the NGSS topics “Human Sustainability” and “Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems. Participants will receive lesson plans (including assessment ideas) and background materials in an electronic format.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will come away with cross-disciplinary ideas to incorporate 3-D learning strategies into hands-on activities around the NGSS topic of Human Sustainability.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Ruder (J.I. Case High School: Racine, WI)

Modeling Investigation of How Quarks Obtain Mass Through the Interaction of the Higgs Boson

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Each attendee will receive materials and instructions to construct a Higgs Boson. Dice and investigative procedure are included to determine the mass of six quarks.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. How to take an abstract concept and create concrete hands-on investigations; 2. Suggestions to go from teacher-centered to a student centered-curriculum; and 3. The importance of looking for trends, patterns, and regularities for modeling.

SPEAKERS:
Gary Schiltz (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Naperville, IL)

Tick-Borne Diseases and One Health: Connecting Humans, Animals, and the Environment

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VFJ7YGB
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VFJ7YGB
Ticks NSTA 2022.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Investigate the spread of tick-borne diseases in humans and animals. Experience hands-on/minds-on NGSS-focused lessons related to One Health, the connections between human, animal, and environmental health.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn about hands-on/minds-on NGSS-focused lessons related to One Health and engage in three-dimensional activities that focus on the science practices of analyzing data and constructing explanations.

SPEAKERS:
Lisa Brosnick (SUNY Buffalo State College: Buffalo, NY), Dina Markowitz (University of Rochester: Rochester, NY)

The Quantitative and Qualitative Modeling of the Doppler Effect

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The first 50 attendees will be be given the materials (circluar rings, rulers, and paper) to model the Doppler effect. Attendees will need a calculator for the quantitative portion of the workshop.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. How to take an abstract concept and create a concrete hands-on investigation; 2. Suggestions to go from teacher-centered to a student centered-curriculum; and 3. The importance of looking for trends, patterns, and regularities for modeling.

SPEAKERS:
Gary Schiltz (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Naperville, IL)

Computational Thinking Using Computer Simulations in High School Biology

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Computational Thinking in Biology Powerpoint Final.pdf
NSTA CT-S Student Lesson Word FINAL.pdf
NSTA CT-S Teacher Lesson Plan FINAL.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

While the NGSS emphasizes the science and engineering practice of computational thinking, there is less familiarity and support for the implementation of this practice compared to other practices. In this session, high school biology teachers will learn how to recognize if a task requires computational thinking or not by analyzing a set of tasks. They will learn how to promote computational thinking in their classrooms by engaging with a newly developed computer simulation. This freely available simulation is based on a real-world phenomenon and designed to address specific performance expectations in biology. Teachers will explore the simulation as learners first, engaging with it as their students would. Then they will reflect on how they used computational thinking to explain the phenomenon. Teachers will leave the session with access to the simulation, suggestions for lesson plans, ideas for incorporating the activity into their curricula, and strategies for utilizing the simulation with all learners in their classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to promote the science and engineering practice of computational thinking in the high school biology classroom. Participants will be introduced to a freely accessible computer simulation (and suggested lesson plans) based on a real-world phenomenon designed to address performance expectations in biology.

SPEAKERS:
Wendy Jackson (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA), Maia Binding (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA), Ben Koo (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA)

Cosmology in the Classroom

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Students are generally intrigued by cosmology but it can be difficult for instructors to explain. For some scientists and teachers, the famous Hubble graph from which we obtain Hubble’s Law makes it obvious that the universe is expanding but for most students (and many of us teachers!) this is not the case: looking at the graph does not obviously imply an expanding universe. We will discuss standard candles and the redshifting of light, and how Hubble used these to measure the speeds and distances to galaxies. We will examine his data and graph and then we will work through an activity that will help students see why the 1929 graph implies an expanding universe. The simple activity uses elastic and rulers and provides a qualitative introduction to the Hubble redshift. Additionally, we will share other ideas and materials for teaching students about cosmology and the expansion of the universe.

TAKEAWAYS:
Students can produce a Hubble-like graph representing an expanding universe using elastic and a ruler.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Brown (University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg: Greensburg, PA)

NASA Space Technology: Robotics and the International Space Station

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Learning Launchers: Robotics (https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/stem-on-station/learning_launchers_robotics) teacher toolkit part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help bring the International Space Station into the classroom. This session will focus on the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity that engages participants to build and test a robotic-like hand and understand how NASA uses robotic explorers to collect information about places where humans cannot travel. After watching videos "Robotics and the International Space Station" & "Benefits For Humanity: From Space to Surgery" participants will work in teams to construct a robotic-like hand and test their robotic hand by picking up an empty soda can or other lightweight objects. The “I Want to Hold Your Hand Activity” is aligned to national standards for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) (i.e., NGSS, ISTE). The focus of the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity ties Engineering Design and NGSS science and engineering practices of defining problems, developing models, and planning and carrying out investigations. This session connects participants to how NASA uses robots in many ways as well as benefit humanity with its robots’ doing science and experiments aboard the International Space Station.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Attendees will gain hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM engagement activity in their classroom using everyday materials that encourages students to construct a robotic-like hand and demonstrate how data are collected when using robotic technology. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how humans and robots are working hand in hand to expand the horizons of space exploration and how robotic research that has helped make advances in medicine, auto manufacturing, among other things. Without robotics, major accomplishments like the building the International Space Station, repairing satellites in space, and exploring other worlds would not be possible.

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

Creating phenomena for YOUR students

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The use of natural phenomena and driving questions to motivate student learning are key in the NGSS. With so many different science phenomena being posted for use in the classroom it can be difficult to determine what makes a good phenomenon and if that phenomena would be appropriate in all educational settings. The focus of this hands-on workshop is to give science teachers the tools needed to find, evaluate and use phenomena and driving questions for Performance Expectations that are consistent with the culture of their classroom. We will first explore and evaluate different phenomena used to teach the NGSS from various sources (websites, kits, science texts). Then we will apply cognitive learning theory and practices to those same phenomena and evaluate them considering different classroom cultures. Finally, participants will choose and discourse about alternative phenomena which might be used given different classroom cultures. The ultimate goal is to help science teachers evaluate and choose phenomena and create driving questions which can drive excellent science pedagogy in THEIR classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Science phenomena and driving questions need to be tailored to the real-world of students in YOUR classroom

SPEAKERS:
Rob Keys (Cornerstone University: Grand Rapids, MI)

Artemis: NASA's Missions to the Moon & Mars

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W186c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Attendees will be provided with a high-level overview of NASA’s Artemis Missions to the Moon and Mars, Next Generation Science Standards, and gain insights on how Engineering Design fits within the NGSS. This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Next Gen STEM - Moon to Mars Educator Guide titled, "Landing Humans on the Moon" (https://www.nasa.gov/stem-ed-resources/landing-humans-on-the-moon.html) which is part of a series of standards-aligned educator guides designed to help students reach their potential to join the next-generation STEM workforce and learn about sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. The focus of the “Safe Landing on the Lunar Surface” activity engages participants to understand how a spacecraft’s engines can provide downward thrust to counteract the force of gravity not only at launch, but also during a landing to slow its descent. Utilizing the engineering design process attendees will use household materials to better understand the difficulties in landing a lander on the surface of a terrestrial body that does not have an atmosphere (no atmospheric braking, no use of parachutes, and no aerodynamic control surfaces). Participants will design, build, and improve a model of a lunar lander that can slow its descent using the downward thrust of a balloon; graph the speed with respect to elevation of a model lunar lander.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendee will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom to help students learn about sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. 2. Attendees will gain hand on minds on experience with implementing NASA STEM engagement activities in their classroom. Then, using engineering design principles, attendees will mirror the process that NASA engineers follow to brainstorm a human lander design, ultimately building an actual model that they will test. 3. Participants will gain insights into the difficulties in landing a lander on the surface of a terrestrial body that does not have an atmosphere (no atmospheric braking, no use of parachutes, and no aerodynamic control surfaces).

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

NESTA and SSSA: Know Soil, Know Life—Dig into the Connections!

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

More than just dirt, soil is vital to life on the planet. Join us as we explore the how’s and why’s of the soil-life connection.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn the fundamental linkages between soils and life while being immersed in numerous activities and demonstrations that support classroom integration of soil topics.

SPEAKERS:
Clay Robinson (CRC Consulting: No City, No State), Susan Chapman (Soil Science Society of America: Madison, WI)

Alexa for Astronauts: Bring Space and Voice Artificial Intelligence to Life Science This Year!

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://my.nsta.org/collection/sCD3GL620v4_E

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session will introduce participants to the Alexa for Astronauts: Using AI to Monitor Health lesson set. We will explore how the instructional sequence exposes high school students to ideas about artificial intelligence (AI) and computer programming, using Amazon Alexa and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) App Inventor, while applying previously built life science ideas to begin to address the problem of monitoring astronauts’ physical health. Participants will gain experience using the Alexa-MIT App Inventor to program custom Alexa skills and learn how to sign up for access to the instructional materials. No accounts needed; bring a laptop or device to access the Alexa-MIT App Inventor.

TAKEAWAYS:
The Alexa-MIT App Inventor platform and teacher supports found in the lesson plans make it possible to incorporate computer science and artificial intelligence ideas in Biology class.

SPEAKERS:
Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Garrett Dorfman (Amazon Future Engineer: Nashville, TN), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Using Nonfiction Children's Books to Engage Students of All Ages in Biology Content

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W181c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Children's Book List NSTA.docx

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Nonfiction for children has changed over the years with a wide variety of types, formats, and writing styles with captivating photos, illustrations, and artwork that engages and informs students of all ages. This interactive session will allow participants to observe a large collection of nonfiction children’s books. These books cover a variety of biology topics, such as chemistry, cells, genetics, diversity of life, microbiology, evolution and ecology. They will also provide information on ecosystem organisms, chemical cycling, and soil background. Books that highlight the life and achievements of a variety of scientists will also be presented to participants. The session will explain how the children’s books are used in several introductory college biology courses to introduce/reinforce textbook content for public health, nursing, elementary education, and other non-science majors. This format can easily be transferred to grade 6-12 classrooms. In the elementary education courses, the books are used in the 5E model format. Students connect science standards, along with explore and expand activities, to the children’s books for a semester collection of elementary lessons. The book list can be used by elementary teachers for nonfiction literacy assignments, library resources, science club activities, and engaging content for science standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
This interactive session will allow participants to observe a large collection of nonfiction children’s books. These books will cover a variety of biology topics, provide ecosystem background information, and highlight the life and achievements of a variety of scientists. The session will explain how the children’s books are used in several introductory college biology and K-12 curriculums.

SPEAKERS:
Mary Gobbett (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN), Alicia Cecil (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

NASA STEM: Computational Thinking: Crew Transportation with Orion

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The free NASA STEM lesson plans introduce the practice of computational thinking and include elements of a real NASA mission. NASA’s Artemis program will return humans to the lunar surface for the first time since 1972, the year of the agency's last Apollo moon landing. This Educator Guide provides four standards-aligned activities to help students learn about NASA's Orion spacecraft that will take astronauts to the Moon and beyond. In this session, we will design and build a crew module model that will secure two 2-cm astronaut figures during a drop test. The PowerPoint will be available to all participants. The PowerPoint will include the videos and activities including the tips and pointers. Session Outline: 5 min - Welcome and Introduction to NASA Artemis Mission 10 min- STEM Engagement strategies and culturally relevant teaching 10 min- Introducing the Engineering Design Challenge 20 min- Teams Design a Crew Vehicle 10 min- Testing the Crew Vehicle 5 min- Reviewing the Resources and Q and A https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/np-2020-02-2805-hq.pdf

TAKEAWAYS:
NASA provides free educational resources that include educator guides with standards-aligned activities to help students use computational thinking while including elements of real NASA missions.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Kohler (NASA Glenn Research Center: Cleveland, OH)

Designing Escape Boxes

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

From Typhoid Mary to COVID-19: Pursuing an Understanding of Disease Transmission and Tracking Through Integrative STEM

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
From Typhoid Mary to COVID-19.pptx.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The exploration of the intersection of science and technology at the turn of the 20th century through present times is examined in this session by beginning with the case study of Typhoid Mary and ending with how Integrative STEM has impacted all areas of COVID-19 Participants use the radio function of the MICROBITs, a computer program called infection models to examine how contagious diseases are spread across a population. After considering how Typhoid was tracked at the time Mary Mallon was an asymptomatic cook, participants first try the simulation without any "vaccinated" participants. Then, participants come up with a method(s) for preventing the radio signal from teaching their MICROBIT and participate in the scenario a second time. Data is collected each round and participants solve which one was patient zero.

TAKEAWAYS:
Engage in a simulation that integrates technology (micro:bits), historical studies, and sense making activities around a current event topic.

SPEAKERS:
Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS), Christine Anne Royce (Shippensburg University: Shippensburg, PA), Beverly DeVore-Wedding (Nebraska Indian Community College: Macy, NE)

NASA's Newest X-plane: "X-57 -- It's Electrifying!"

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W193a


STRAND: No Strand

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Did you know that every U.S. aircraft flying today, and every U.S. air traffic control facility, uses NASA-developed technology in some way? Participants in this session will gain insights into how NASA Aeronautics work to make aviation truly sustainable by reducing delays and environmental impacts, transforming aviation efficiency and safety, while reducing noise, fuel use, harmful emissions, and ultimately transform the way we fly. NASA’s X-57 Maxwell is an experimental aircraft designed to test operating multiple electric motors for use in turning propellers – an idea known as “distributed electric propulsion.” This session highlights an activity from NASA’s “X-57 Electric Airplane: STEM Learning Module” (https://www.nasa.gov/aeroresearch/stem/X57 ) part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help students learn about NASA’s X-57 Maxwell and the science behind electric propulsion. This session will focus on the “X-57 Maxwell: Circuits Activity Guide” that engages participants to build a light-up paper helicopter by creating a “parallel circuit” that uses copper foil tape, two LED lights, and a battery. This session’s goals are to demonstrate that an all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly. Session participants will understand that knowledge gained from the X-57 Maxwell research will help engineers design future electric-powered aircraft for everything from urban air mobility to moving passengers and cargo between nearby cities.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM activity in their classroom that encourages students to create a parallel circuit on a paper helicopter as an introduction to circuitry and propulsion. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how NASA’s X-57 Maxwell all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly while gaining a better understanding of the STEM concepts of energy transfer, and the physical science of pressure and aerodynamics.

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate Initiative, and Kikim Media

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate In

STRAND: No Strand

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This session will introduce participants to Our Beautiful Planet, a collection of classroom-ready films and lesson plans that highlight the science and engineering practices scientists use to explain the phenomenon of climate change. The collection of over 10 lessons brings Sensemaking to environmental science by cultivating student curiosity with engaging and eye-popping phenomena. Participants will generate questions and use model data as evidence to construct an explanation of how increases in global temperature could shift infection rates of mosquito-borne diseases. Using their explanation and information provided in the film, participants will consider the effect of this shift on humans.

TAKEAWAYS:
Providing students with an engaging and relevant phenomenon can be used to drive student learning about climate change and inspire them to examine critical climate issues in their own communities.

SPEAKERS:
Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

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