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2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 6 results

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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What Is Sensemaking? Exploration and Consensus-Building Tasks for Individuals and Teams

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Join us to learn what sensemaking is and how to use research-based resources to engage students in making sense of the world around them. Leave with a collection of resources to move your professional learning forward no matter where you are on the sensemaking continuum.

Takeaways: Develop an understanding of what sensemaking is and how it can help build classrooms where students are able to make sense of the world around them. Leaders walk away with a consensus-building exercise for their team.

Speakers

Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Elizabeth Allan (University of Central Oklahoma: Edmond, OK)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Creating phenomena for YOUR students

McCormick Place - W178b

The use of natural phenomena and driving questions to motivate student learning are key in the NGSS. With so many different science phenomena being posted for use in the classroom it can be difficult to determine what makes a good phenomenon and if that phenomena would be appropriate in all educational settings. The focus of this hands-on workshop is to give science teachers the tools needed to find, evaluate and use phenomena and driving questions for Performance Expectations that are consistent with the culture of their classroom. We will first explore and evaluate different phenomena used to teach the NGSS from various sources (websites, kits, science texts). Then we will apply cognitive learning theory and practices to those same phenomena and evaluate them considering different classroom cultures. Finally, participants will choose and discourse about alternative phenomena which might be used given different classroom cultures. The ultimate goal is to help science teachers evaluate and choose phenomena and create driving questions which can drive excellent science pedagogy in THEIR classrooms.

Takeaways: Science phenomena and driving questions need to be tailored to the real-world of students in YOUR classroom

Speakers

Rob Keys (Cornerstone University: Grand Rapids, MI)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Using Nonfiction Children's Books to Engage Students of All Ages in Biology Content

McCormick Place - W181c

Nonfiction for children has changed over the years with a wide variety of types, formats, and writing styles with captivating photos, illustrations, and artwork that engages and informs students of all ages. This interactive session will allow participants to observe a large collection of nonfiction children’s books. These books cover a variety of biology topics, such as chemistry, cells, genetics, diversity of life, microbiology, evolution and ecology. They will also provide information on ecosystem organisms, chemical cycling, and soil background. Books that highlight the life and achievements of a variety of scientists will also be presented to participants. The session will explain how the children’s books are used in several introductory college biology courses to introduce/reinforce textbook content for public health, nursing, elementary education, and other non-science majors. This format can easily be transferred to grade 6-12 classrooms. In the elementary education courses, the books are used in the 5E model format. Students connect science standards, along with explore and expand activities, to the children’s books for a semester collection of elementary lessons. The book list can be used by elementary teachers for nonfiction literacy assignments, library resources, science club activities, and engaging content for science standards.

Takeaways: This interactive session will allow participants to observe a large collection of nonfiction children’s books. These books will cover a variety of biology topics, provide ecosystem background information, and highlight the life and achievements of a variety of scientists. The session will explain how the children’s books are used in several introductory college biology and K-12 curriculums.

Speakers

Mary Gobbett (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN), Alicia Cecil (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Children's Book List NSTA.docx

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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NASA STEM: Computational Thinking: Crew Transportation with Orion

McCormick Place - W175a

The free NASA STEM lesson plans introduce the practice of computational thinking and include elements of a real NASA mission. NASA’s Artemis program will return humans to the lunar surface for the first time since 1972, the year of the agency's last Apollo moon landing. This Educator Guide provides four standards-aligned activities to help students learn about NASA's Orion spacecraft that will take astronauts to the Moon and beyond. In this session, we will design and build a crew module model that will secure two 2-cm astronaut figures during a drop test. The PowerPoint will be available to all participants. The PowerPoint will include the videos and activities including the tips and pointers. Session Outline: 5 min - Welcome and Introduction to NASA Artemis Mission 10 min- STEM Engagement strategies and culturally relevant teaching 10 min- Introducing the Engineering Design Challenge 20 min- Teams Design a Crew Vehicle 10 min- Testing the Crew Vehicle 5 min- Reviewing the Resources and Q and A https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/np-2020-02-2805-hq.pdf

Takeaways: NASA provides free educational resources that include educator guides with standards-aligned activities to help students use computational thinking while including elements of real NASA missions.

Speakers

Susan Kohler (NASA Glenn Research Center: Cleveland, OH)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Designing Escape Boxes

McCormick Place - W183b

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

Takeaways: Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

Speakers

Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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NASA's Newest X-plane: "X-57 -- It's Electrifying!"

McCormick Place - W193a

Did you know that every U.S. aircraft flying today, and every U.S. air traffic control facility, uses NASA-developed technology in some way? Participants in this session will gain insights into how NASA Aeronautics work to make aviation truly sustainable by reducing delays and environmental impacts, transforming aviation efficiency and safety, while reducing noise, fuel use, harmful emissions, and ultimately transform the way we fly. NASA’s X-57 Maxwell is an experimental aircraft designed to test operating multiple electric motors for use in turning propellers – an idea known as “distributed electric propulsion.” This session highlights an activity from NASA’s “X-57 Electric Airplane: STEM Learning Module” (https://www.nasa.gov/aeroresearch/stem/X57 ) part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help students learn about NASA’s X-57 Maxwell and the science behind electric propulsion. This session will focus on the “X-57 Maxwell: Circuits Activity Guide” that engages participants to build a light-up paper helicopter by creating a “parallel circuit” that uses copper foil tape, two LED lights, and a battery. This session’s goals are to demonstrate that an all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly. Session participants will understand that knowledge gained from the X-57 Maxwell research will help engineers design future electric-powered aircraft for everything from urban air mobility to moving passengers and cargo between nearby cities.

Takeaways: 1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM activity in their classroom that encourages students to create a parallel circuit on a paper helicopter as an introduction to circuitry and propulsion. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how NASA’s X-57 Maxwell all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly while gaining a better understanding of the STEM concepts of energy transfer, and the physical science of pressure and aerodynamics.

Speakers

LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)