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2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 10 results

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Ecological Justice: Why Education Is Our Best Defense

McCormick Place - Skyline W375e

From A Silent Spring, The Limits to Growth and Population Bomb of the 1960s and 70s to today’s planetary boundary science, overshoot, and creating a safe and just space for humanity, some would say that “the science is in” and that it is pretty gloomy. Additionally, now in the frenetic information age, humans are overwhelmingly aware of the multitude of crises we face as a species. Our collective mental health is tanking. Knowing our predicament is one thing, but knowing what to do about it is another. Education may be one of our most powerful tools. However, delivery, content, and reach are impaired by multiple factors including politics, economics, religion, and the numerous influences affecting everyone’s social construction of knowledge. This presentation will share examples from the fields of environmental, conservation, and humane education and then focus on the potential promise of comprehensive education for ecological justice.

About the Speaker
Sarah BexellSarah M. Bexell is clinical associate professor with the Graduate School of Social Work and Director of Humane Education with the Institute for Human-Animal Connection, both at the University of Denver, Colorado. Sarah is also a faculty member teaching Animal Protection for the Institute for Humane Education at Antioch University New England and senior advisor to the Education Department of the Chengdu Research Base for Giant Pandas, China. She teaches and does research in the areas of ecological justice, humane education, and animal protection.

Speakers

Sarah Bexell (University of Denver: Denver, CO)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Lucy’s Legacy – Human Evolution for the 21st Century Classroom

McCormick Place - W195

The 1974 discovery of the iconic Lucy fossil in Ethiopia changed our understanding of human origins. Almost everyone today knows of Lucy, but over the last 48 years the field of human origins has exploded thanks to new discoveries all over the world as well as critical new developments in the realm of molecular biology. Few biology classes address these advances. However, the tools and techniques students learn in STEM classes have a direct connection to the advances and changes that have shaped modern work with human origins. Attending this session will give you the chance to appreciate the revolution that has occurred since “Lucy” and offer you tools to bring new understanding to your students in ways you can weave into your curriculum in less controversial ways connected to evolution, fossils, DNA, proteomics, genealogy, biogeography, 3D printing, as well as topics related to more recent human evolution (skin color, lactose tolerance, and high-altitude adaptation). As a 32-year K-12 human evolution educator who has been fortunate to work with leaders in the field, I have had a front row seat to many of the milestones of human evolution in the 21st century and I’m eager to share them with you.

Takeaways: Since the discovery of Lucy, our understanding of human origins has grown and changed thanks to new discoveries and technologies – participants will learn about these amazing changes and how to integrate these new discoveries into their biology curriculum.

Speakers

John Mead (St. Mark's School of Texas: Dallas, TX)

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Making Group Work Fair: The Potential Pitfalls of Student Peer Evaluations

McCormick Place - W178b

Although group projects have been shown to increase learning and cooperation, bullying can sneak into student peer evaluations. Examples and alternatives to ghosting presented.

Takeaways: Science classrooms are a great place for group projects to enhance learning, but students may unwittingly be ghosted from their group, ultimately making them seem like they are not a team player. We as teachers must be diligent against bullying/ghosting.

Speakers

Diane Huelskamp (Wright State University-Lake Campus: Celina, OH)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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A Cancer Case Study Storyline and Research Lesson

McCormick Place - W196a

Enjoy conversation about our research lesson collaboration with the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center EYES (Educators and Youth Enjoy Science) teacher research experience.

Takeaways: Authentic teacher research experiences can catalyze students' career interest, authentic classroom inquiry, curriculum development, and relevant professional learning.

Speakers

Steven Rogg (Coherent Learning Design: Lindenhurst, IL), Pamela Wagner (George Westinghouse College Prep: Chicago, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

A Cancer Storyline Slide Deck
A Cancer Storyline Landing Page
Quick access to resources.

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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The Scoop on STEM Competitions Administered by NSTA

McCormick Place - W176a

Join us for a chance to learn more about  NSTA-administered competitions and awards from NSTA staff and past participants. NSTA-administered competitions include NSTA Teacher Awards, the Army Educational Outreach Program, Shell Science Lab Regional Challenge, and Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision competitions. This engaging hour will include discussion and tips on how to engage K–12 students in project-based learning opportunities that are no cost to participate.

Takeaways: 1. Engage with educators that have participated in NSTA-administered competitions and awards; 2. Learn more about opportunities to engage students in project-based learning; and 3. Share best practices and tips to foster inquiry-based learning and showcase ideas.

Speakers

Acacia McKenna (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Competitions_ presentation.pdf

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Global Conversations: International Film Festival and Share-a-thon

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 21

In this self-directed session, you will be able to: Interact with educators in face-to-face poster presentations; Watch short video submissions from educators around the world; and Participate in hands-on/minds-on, takeaway learning experiences.

Takeaways: Science education occurs everywhere on this planet. We can get ideas and best practices from collegues around the world.

Speakers

Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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EVOLUTIONARY MOVERS & SHAKERS: Researching, Debating, and Ranking the “Top 20” Evolutionary Scientists of All Time.

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 26

Don’t debate evolution – Rather dig deeper into evolution by having your students research, debate, & rank the top evolutionary thinkers of all time.

Takeaways: Rather than stage a debate over evolution which tends to be fraught with misinformation, have your students debate & rank the top figures in the history of evolutionary thought. They can then compare their ranking with that of a group of evolutionary experts.

Speakers

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Brain-Based Instruction: Using Cognitive Psychology to Boost Science Learning

McCormick Place - W178b

Cognitive science has identified flexible and often counterintuitive cognitive strategies that boost student learning. Teachers will learn how to implement these techniques within their classrooms.

Takeaways: Learn how to apply multiple practical, flexible, and research-based cognitive strategies, including retrieving information from memory, distributing practice across time, scaffolding, and mixing together different examples, within their own classrooms to improve student learning.

Speakers

Jonathan Tullis (The University of Arizona: Tucson, AZ)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Using Nonfiction Children's Books to Engage Students of All Ages in Biology Content

McCormick Place - W181c

Nonfiction for children has changed over the years with a wide variety of types, formats, and writing styles with captivating photos, illustrations, and artwork that engages and informs students of all ages. This interactive session will allow participants to observe a large collection of nonfiction children’s books. These books cover a variety of biology topics, such as chemistry, cells, genetics, diversity of life, microbiology, evolution and ecology. They will also provide information on ecosystem organisms, chemical cycling, and soil background. Books that highlight the life and achievements of a variety of scientists will also be presented to participants. The session will explain how the children’s books are used in several introductory college biology courses to introduce/reinforce textbook content for public health, nursing, elementary education, and other non-science majors. This format can easily be transferred to grade 6-12 classrooms. In the elementary education courses, the books are used in the 5E model format. Students connect science standards, along with explore and expand activities, to the children’s books for a semester collection of elementary lessons. The book list can be used by elementary teachers for nonfiction literacy assignments, library resources, science club activities, and engaging content for science standards.

Takeaways: This interactive session will allow participants to observe a large collection of nonfiction children’s books. These books will cover a variety of biology topics, provide ecosystem background information, and highlight the life and achievements of a variety of scientists. The session will explain how the children’s books are used in several introductory college biology and K-12 curriculums.

Speakers

Mary Gobbett (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN), Alicia Cecil (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Children's Book List NSTA.docx

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Designing Escape Boxes

McCormick Place - W183b

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

Takeaways: Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

Speakers

Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.