OpenSciEd - Carolina (P-U from March)
 

2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 8 results

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Ecological Justice: Why Education Is Our Best Defense

McCormick Place - Skyline W375e

From A Silent Spring, The Limits to Growth and Population Bomb of the 1960s and 70s to today’s planetary boundary science, overshoot, and creating a safe and just space for humanity, some would say that “the science is in” and that it is pretty gloomy. Additionally, now in the frenetic information age, humans are overwhelmingly aware of the multitude of crises we face as a species. Our collective mental health is tanking. Knowing our predicament is one thing, but knowing what to do about it is another. Education may be one of our most powerful tools. However, delivery, content, and reach are impaired by multiple factors including politics, economics, religion, and the numerous influences affecting everyone’s social construction of knowledge. This presentation will share examples from the fields of environmental, conservation, and humane education and then focus on the potential promise of comprehensive education for ecological justice.

About the Speaker
Sarah BexellSarah M. Bexell is clinical associate professor with the Graduate School of Social Work and Director of Humane Education with the Institute for Human-Animal Connection, both at the University of Denver, Colorado. Sarah is also a faculty member teaching Animal Protection for the Institute for Humane Education at Antioch University New England and senior advisor to the Education Department of the Chengdu Research Base for Giant Pandas, China. She teaches and does research in the areas of ecological justice, humane education, and animal protection.

Speakers

Sarah Bexell (University of Denver: Denver, CO)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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What Is Sensemaking? Exploration and Consensus-Building Tasks for Individuals and Teams

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Join us to learn what sensemaking is and how to use research-based resources to engage students in making sense of the world around them. Leave with a collection of resources to move your professional learning forward no matter where you are on the sensemaking continuum.

Takeaways: Develop an understanding of what sensemaking is and how it can help build classrooms where students are able to make sense of the world around them. Leaders walk away with a consensus-building exercise for their team.

Speakers

Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Elizabeth Allan (University of Central Oklahoma: Edmond, OK)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Including Teachers in Developing Large-Scale Assessments for Science

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Learn about the novel approach taken by Illinois to include teacher voice in developing a statewide three-dimensional science assessment.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about the process of developing a state-wide assessment written by local educators.

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Harvey Henson (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL), Angela Box (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL)

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Making Group Work Fair: The Potential Pitfalls of Student Peer Evaluations

McCormick Place - W178b

Although group projects have been shown to increase learning and cooperation, bullying can sneak into student peer evaluations. Examples and alternatives to ghosting presented.

Takeaways: Science classrooms are a great place for group projects to enhance learning, but students may unwittingly be ghosted from their group, ultimately making them seem like they are not a team player. We as teachers must be diligent against bullying/ghosting.

Speakers

Diane Huelskamp (Wright State University-Lake Campus: Celina, OH)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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A Cancer Case Study Storyline and Research Lesson

McCormick Place - W196a

Enjoy conversation about our research lesson collaboration with the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center EYES (Educators and Youth Enjoy Science) teacher research experience.

Takeaways: Authentic teacher research experiences can catalyze students' career interest, authentic classroom inquiry, curriculum development, and relevant professional learning.

Speakers

Steven Rogg (Coherent Learning Design: Lindenhurst, IL), Pamela Wagner (George Westinghouse College Prep: Chicago, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

A Cancer Storyline Slide Deck
A Cancer Storyline Landing Page
Quick access to resources.

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Global Conversations: International Film Festival and Share-a-thon

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 21

In this self-directed session, you will be able to: Interact with educators in face-to-face poster presentations; Watch short video submissions from educators around the world; and Participate in hands-on/minds-on, takeaway learning experiences.

Takeaways: Science education occurs everywhere on this planet. We can get ideas and best practices from collegues around the world.

Speakers

Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Creating a Science Classroom Podcast

McCormick Place - W187c

Marshall Escamilla, one of the co-hosts of the freely-available Tumble Science Podcast for Kids, will share some of the basics of creating a podcast with your class. Classroom podcasts are a great way for students to share their learning with the broader community, and can be used both as assessment and communication tools--and it's a lot easier to do than you'd think. Beginning with a brief description of what features make Tumble free and accessible, Marshall will walk educators through all the thing they'll need to consider when creating a podcast. We'll start by asking questions like: -Who is the intended audience for this podcast? -What is the overall topic for it? -How many episodes do we want to create, and how often do we want to release them? Then we'll move on to some of the technical elements. What are the requirements for creating a podcast studio in your classroom? What equipment do you need to buy? What software do students need to have access to? how do you ensure that students can have access to what they need in order to be successful? Finally, we will discuss some of the basic skills teachers will need to ensure student success: knowledge of best audio recording practices, and how to use a few easily-accessible software tools to make students' work sound its best.

Takeaways: Attendees at this ession will learn the very basics of how to create a classroom podcast from a professional podcaster.

Speakers

Marshall Escamilla (Tumble Media Production: Greenfield, MA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Podcasting NSTA Session Resources

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Creating phenomena for YOUR students

McCormick Place - W178b

The use of natural phenomena and driving questions to motivate student learning are key in the NGSS. With so many different science phenomena being posted for use in the classroom it can be difficult to determine what makes a good phenomenon and if that phenomena would be appropriate in all educational settings. The focus of this hands-on workshop is to give science teachers the tools needed to find, evaluate and use phenomena and driving questions for Performance Expectations that are consistent with the culture of their classroom. We will first explore and evaluate different phenomena used to teach the NGSS from various sources (websites, kits, science texts). Then we will apply cognitive learning theory and practices to those same phenomena and evaluate them considering different classroom cultures. Finally, participants will choose and discourse about alternative phenomena which might be used given different classroom cultures. The ultimate goal is to help science teachers evaluate and choose phenomena and create driving questions which can drive excellent science pedagogy in THEIR classrooms.

Takeaways: Science phenomena and driving questions need to be tailored to the real-world of students in YOUR classroom

Speakers

Rob Keys (Cornerstone University: Grand Rapids, MI)