2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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Pathway/Course

FILTERS APPLIED:PreK - 5, Hands-On Workshop, No Strand, General Science

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
18 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Text to Investigation: An Expansion of a Common Reading Connections Strategy

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W179a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

According to the 2018 NSSME Survey, 77% of elementary teacher’s self-report that they feel very well prepared to teach reading/language arts and only 31% rate their preparedness for science at the same level. Furthermore, the description of activities that elementary teachers indicate students participate in show reading about science or engaging in hands-on laboratory activities at just under 50%. Furthermore, students gain a deeper understanding of a text when they make authentic connections. Science investigations that incorporate phenomenon are perfect vehicles for students to make authentic connections. Students who make connections while reading are better able to understand the text they are reading. It is important for students to draw on their prior knowledge and experiences to connect with the text. Students are thinking when they are connecting, which makes them more engaged in the reading experience. The Framework even stresses that “students should be asked to engage in the communication of science, especially regarding the investigations they are conducting…” (p. 76) This session will focus on the expansion of a common strategic reading strategy related to “text to connections”, elementary teachers can support students in constructing understanding and connecting it to their own life.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will explore and learn how to how to expand a common literacy strategy of “text to” connections when using picture books in the elementary science classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Christine Anne Royce (Shippensburg University: Shippensburg, PA)

Strategies to Elevate Students Scientific Literacy with Real-World Data

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document of links and the slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Science literacy is essential to be informed and engaged citizens in the 21st century. Data are what we use to do science. Thus, reading and making sense of real-world data are fundamental skills to being scientifically literate and a fun way to engage learners with science. However, how do we incorporate data into K-8 science without feeling overburdened with yet another thing to teach? By integrating it into what we are already doing! Join us to explore the connections between data, science, and literacy. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. The goal is to increase our data toolkit of strategies and resources to increase science literacy and relevance for students. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better helps students do and communicate science. Working with and learning from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ literacy skills. Let’s set our students up for success now and in the future!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into K-8 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, LLC)

Humanizing Science: A Rubric for Evaluating Science Trade Books

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W175c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Humanizing Science Workshop Resources
Access workshop slides, materials, completed examples, and a searchable Outstanding Science Trade Book list at this link.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Trade books are often used to support science instruction, and are an effective way to connect ideas about how science works to classroom science experiences. In this workshop, we will share a rubric for evaluating trade books for science read-alouds and discuss how the tool can be used to inform instruction (e.g., developing discussion questions). The rubric focuses on four concepts related to humanizing science, and aligned with views of nature of science in the Next Generation Science Standards: Science is done by diverse people, Scientists interpret empirical evidence to support their claims, Scientists use a variety of methods, and Scientists are creative at all stages of their investigations. These four concepts support students’ understanding of how science works, laying the foundation for being an effective consumer of science. Additionally, these four concepts present a more accurate representation of scientists, in contrast with many long-standing stereotypes about scientists. Attendees will have the opportunity to use the rubric to analyze elementary-level science trade books and develop a plan for implementing the read-alouds in class. We will conclude by examining how teachers can layer selected trade books effectively into their existing science curriculum.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn why representing science as a human activity is important for students’ understanding of how science works, and will learn how to select and plan for read-alouds of books that humanize science into their existing science curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
Jeanne Brunner (University of Massachusetts Amherst: Amherst, MA), Kathleen Mahoney (Doctoral Student)

Inclusive, Hands-on Science Instruction for Elementary Students K-5

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W186c


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

As a K-5 English Learner Teacher, I work with all grades, and for the last five years I've been helping students reach NGSS Performance Expectations through inductive, hands-on science lessons. I’m also a Science Methods Professor at North Central College, where I coach pre-service teachers in how to create and teach NGSS-aligned, three-dimensional science lessons. In this session, teachers will experience several hands-on mini-lessons and explore the meaning of inductive learning in science. Teachers will inductively discover how circuits work and engineer solutions for erosion. We’ll also use digital microscopes to explore the needs of plants and the structure and function living things, so please bring a device with a USB port if you can. Throughout the session, I’ll showcase digital portfolio examples from my K-5 students over the last 5 years. Elementary teachers are often intimidated by teaching and assessing the ambitious performance expectations of the NGSS, especially given the limited class time available for science instruction. Incorporating experiential science lessons with reading, writing, and speaking allows cross-curricular connections with ELA. Teachers will see many examples of digital notebooks used with English Learners and special education students for ongoing performance assessment of both Science and ELA standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Inductive, and inclusive hands-on science experiences and the use of digital portfolios lead to deeper learning as well as ELA & Math connections for K-5 students.

SPEAKERS:
Melissa Eaton (Cowlishaw Elementary School: Naperville, IL)

STEM for All! Benefits of STEM Integration for Struggling to Gifted Learners, and Everyone in Between

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W187b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA_STEMforALL.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

To effectively engage audience members, I will balance their readiness to learn, cognitive load, and stimulating activities. Using real-world examples, I will demonstrate the power of STEM in elementary classrooms to grow all learners and provide necessary 21st-century skills. Often STEM is an enrichment offered to high-achiever but struggling learners have even more to gain from STEM including confidence and leadership. I will focus on practical application, but valuable references and data will be included to support my practices. I will begin the session with a survey to identify the needs and perceptions of participants regarding STEM integration. Based on input, I will share research-based strategies, classroom integration examples, or dispel misconceptions. I will include an interactive STEM activity using index cards and paper clips to provide a STEM lesson model and demonstrate the ease of integrating STEM with simple, classroom supplies. Participants will leave the session with a better understanding of the benefits of STEM in K-5 classrooms and feel more comfortable integrating STEM into their own classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will understand the value of STEM integration beyond the four letters of the acronym, including the benefits of productive struggle of high achievers and how the grit of struggling learners are paramount in the success of STEM challenges.

SPEAKERS:
Erika Neuman (University of Texas at San Antonio: No City, No State)

Stop “doing” data and start “using” data! Utilizing Google forms and sheets to collect and analyze data so you can focus on what comes next!

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W179a


STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

So many data conversations fall flat because of current methods of data collection. What if we could vary the type and frequency we collect and analyze data using google forms and spreadsheets? This would allow us to have more in-depth conversations about what the data is say and how we can use it to move instruction forward. In this session, 5 different tools will be presented to teachers that allows them to collect data in different ways. With these tools, the focus is no longer on the past and why things happened, but focus on the future of what we can do to respond to the data.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn about and receive templates for multiple tools using google forms and spreadsheets to realize the vision of a good data conversation

SPEAKERS:
Rocco Williams (Fort Worth ISD: Fort Worth, TX)

Teaching Grey Water Reuse and Water Recycling

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Water: It’s constantly in use all around us, but did you know that you can recycle water just like paper or plastic? Droughts and water scarcity are becoming an increasingly common phenomenon, and it is estimated that nearly 6 billion people will suffer from clean water scarcity by 2050. Yet, every year, Americans throw 11 trillion gallons of reusable water, also known as grey water, down the drain. In this series of lessons, students will learn about where their water comes from, the human water cycle, the three types of water and the connection between droughts and climate change. These lessons will also tie into the broader themes of sustainability and climate science and incorporate hands-on STEM activities and career connections. The lessons are primarily for elementary students but can be adapted for older audiences. They will be free for all teachers to use in their classrooms and are developed by Shreya Ramachandran, founder of The Grey Water Project in concert with educators. Join us for the presentation to learn more about grey water, why teaching about grey water and water conservation is important and how you can bring this to your classroom!

TAKEAWAYS:
Session participants will learn about grey water reuse and water recycling and how they can be effective drought solutions.

SPEAKERS:
Shreya Ramachandran (Stanford University: Stanford, CA)

Using Picture Book to Inspire STEM Learning, K–5

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Learn how to integrate STEM and literacy through the use of high-quality STEM-related picture books.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn strategies for integrating STEM and literacy through the use of picture books in the K–5 classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Kim Stilwell (BIOZONE Corp.: Parker, CO)

Integrating Makerspace for an Inclusive Classroom

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W179b


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

It is often thought that a makerspace activity is something that is nice to do with students but not a necessity. Yet when makerspace activities are integrated into daily instruction, it can open many avenues that promote an inclusive classroom. This workshop will focus on strategies and ways to use makerspace to promote student voice and choice for areas of concept development, empathy-driven problem solving, and assessment. Participants will explore the key elements of makerspace and examine ways to use makerspace challenges to support sense-making. The discussion will also focus on the idea that makerspace activities can nudge all students to consider multiple ways of solving problems, thus enhancing their “out of the box” thinking. As part of this session, participants will explore different strategies in using makerspace to introduce a phenomenon, model a phenomenon, and assess students understanding on different dimensions of learning: Crosscutting Concepts, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Science and Engineering Practices.

TAKEAWAYS:
Makerspace challenges provide student choice and voice in how they make sense of a phenomenon, a solution to a problems, and core ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Michele Detwiler (Gary Adult High School: Tampa, FL)

Inspiring Curiosity and Writing with NSTA Kids Books, K–5

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Learn how NSTA Kids books such as the Next Time You See series can connect students with nature and inspire them to write their own books about natural objects and phenomena.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how literacy and science can be connected through writing activities and receive classroom-ready resources (videos and graphic organizers) to guide your students through a Mentor Text Study.

SPEAKERS:
Kim Stilwell (BIOZONE Corp.: Parker, CO)

NGSS-Aligned Assessments for Formative Use in the Elementary Classroom

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W181b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Elem Assessments for Formative Use.pdf
Handout Packet.pdf

STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

This session will provide an introduction to the freely available Next Generation Science Assessment (NGSA) Elementary (Grades 3-5) task portal (https://ngss-assessment.portal.concord.org/elementary-school) and the companion virtual learning community (VLC), Understanding Progress in Science (https://www.upinscience.org/). The NGSA Elementary tasks are multidimensional and aligned with NGSS performance expectations. They were co-developed with teachers and can work with any curriculum. The Understanding Progress in Science VLC provides additional resources, support, and community of practice dedicated to using assessment tasks formatively in elementary science. Participants can learn more about why and how to use NGSA Elementary tasks, get help understanding student responses and using rubrics, and discuss how to use student responses to guide instruction. During this Bring Your Own Device hands-on workshop, we will share examples of how teachers have used the tasks, sample student responses, and instructional next steps. Then we will guide attendees as they explore the NGSA Elementary tasks and consider how to integrate them into their teaching. Participants will also have the opportunity to explore the resources within the Understanding Progress in Science VLC that can support the formative use of tasks in their classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to access and use two related, freely available online resources that support elementary teachers’ use of NGSS-aligned assessment and instruction: A website with tasks aligned with the performance expectations for Grades 3-5 and a virtual learning community around using assessments formatively in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Liz Lehman (American Medical Association: Chicago, IL), Brian Gane (University of Kansas: No City, No State), Sania Zaidi (Education Development Center, Inc.: Waltham, MA)

Experience Before Explanation: Making STEM Lessons Accessible for All

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W185a


STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Come learn how you can make your STEM lessons more accessible for all students by making a few simple changes to your instructional sequence. During this session you will experience an engaging hands-on lesson that models what this structure can look like in a real classroom. We will also discuss the research behind allowing students to experience concepts before introducing students to new vocabulary terms and how this can give all students an entry point into learning STEM content.

TAKEAWAYS:
Sequence matters! When we allow students to experience concepts before we introduce scientific and academic vocabulary, we give all students an entry point into STEM content.

SPEAKERS:
Lee Jimenez (3rd Grade: , OH), Leslie Silbernagel (Northern Kentucky University: Highland Heights, KY)

Asking the Students: Creating and Implementing a Metacognitive Data Tracker for Assessments

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W179a


STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Data meetings are as much of a reality to K–12 teachers and students as high-stakes testing. In this session we will share a data tool, as well as the surprising results we have collected so far, to help teachers in understanding students' struggles by asking the students directly what aspect of the assessment they struggled with the most. Our findings are serving students and teachers by improving Tier 1 instruction planning and delivery as well as leading to a much richer and in-depth conversation during data meetings.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will be given the knowledge and tools to implement our Metacognitive Data Tracker in order to improve Tier 1 instruction.

SPEAKERS:
Rocco Williams (Fort Worth ISD: Fort Worth, TX)

NASA Space Technology: Robotics and the International Space Station

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Learning Launchers: Robotics (https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/stem-on-station/learning_launchers_robotics) teacher toolkit part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help bring the International Space Station into the classroom. This session will focus on the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity that engages participants to build and test a robotic-like hand and understand how NASA uses robotic explorers to collect information about places where humans cannot travel. After watching videos "Robotics and the International Space Station" & "Benefits For Humanity: From Space to Surgery" participants will work in teams to construct a robotic-like hand and test their robotic hand by picking up an empty soda can or other lightweight objects. The “I Want to Hold Your Hand Activity” is aligned to national standards for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) (i.e., NGSS, ISTE). The focus of the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity ties Engineering Design and NGSS science and engineering practices of defining problems, developing models, and planning and carrying out investigations. This session connects participants to how NASA uses robots in many ways as well as benefit humanity with its robots’ doing science and experiments aboard the International Space Station.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Attendees will gain hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM engagement activity in their classroom using everyday materials that encourages students to construct a robotic-like hand and demonstrate how data are collected when using robotic technology. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how humans and robots are working hand in hand to expand the horizons of space exploration and how robotic research that has helped make advances in medicine, auto manufacturing, among other things. Without robotics, major accomplishments like the building the International Space Station, repairing satellites in space, and exploring other worlds would not be possible.

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

Creating phenomena for YOUR students

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The use of natural phenomena and driving questions to motivate student learning are key in the NGSS. With so many different science phenomena being posted for use in the classroom it can be difficult to determine what makes a good phenomenon and if that phenomena would be appropriate in all educational settings. The focus of this hands-on workshop is to give science teachers the tools needed to find, evaluate and use phenomena and driving questions for Performance Expectations that are consistent with the culture of their classroom. We will first explore and evaluate different phenomena used to teach the NGSS from various sources (websites, kits, science texts). Then we will apply cognitive learning theory and practices to those same phenomena and evaluate them considering different classroom cultures. Finally, participants will choose and discourse about alternative phenomena which might be used given different classroom cultures. The ultimate goal is to help science teachers evaluate and choose phenomena and create driving questions which can drive excellent science pedagogy in THEIR classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Science phenomena and driving questions need to be tailored to the real-world of students in YOUR classroom

SPEAKERS:
Rob Keys (Cornerstone University: Grand Rapids, MI)

Maker-Centered Learning in the Early Years

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W175c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Maker Centered Learning screen 072322.pptx
Resources for Maker Centered Learning in the Early Years.docx

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Research shows many benefits of a maker-centered learning environment, however many teachers do not consider their classroom “maker classrooms” In this hands-on workshop, participants will see many different categories of making in an early years class, which allows participants to begin to reframe their view of their own classes. Through hands-on activities, participants experience a range of maker-centered learning activities which showcases how these activities can be used to develop problem solving and sensemaking for students, with built in modifications support MLL and students with special rights. Literacy development and formative assessments are also continuous threads in maker-centered learning as students learn and use language in the making process. Through observation and discussion of maker-made artifacts, and the processes leading to these artifacts, teachers can assess student understanding Furthermore, with many maker-centered activities, family and community connections are strengthened as students observe their own community, ask questions, and involve others outside of school in their making activities. Conference activities will be limited to portable, lightweight materials, with discussions and examples of different materials in action

TAKEAWAYS:
1) Discover new making opportunities to support sensemaking in your class while developing student skills in communication, collaboration as well as identifying and solving problems 2) Identify ways of integrating maker centered opportunities in your class planning, with specific attention to the early years 3) Observe different ways of bringing family’s funds of knowledge into a maker centered classroom

SPEAKERS:
Anne Lowry (Aleph Academy: Reno, NV)

Welcome to Hogwarts: STEM-ing with Harry Potter

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W178b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Email addresses.PNG
STEMming with Harry Potter.pdf

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Enter a magical world with your students where everyone becomes enchanted with STEM. This budget-friendly lesson can engage and excite your students! Cross-curricular materials provided!

TAKEAWAYS:
1. The cross-curricular unit uses common cost-effective materials, as well as STEM topics, to promote learning for all students in the classroom; 2. there are a variety of assessment tools for different student ability levels, including participation assessments, written assessments, and verbal assessments; and 3. this "station-based" lesson will keep students moving through the STEM topics, captivated by the activities, learning without knowing it is happening.

SPEAKERS:
Elesha Goodfriend (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN), Kelly Moore (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN)

Supporting Early Elementary Students in Asking Questions with Driving Question Boards

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W187b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
DQB handout PDF.pdf
DQB handout for early elementary
Early Elementary DQB (1).pdf
presentation slides

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Wondering how to inspire students’ curiosity and interest in science? Driving Question Boards (DQB) allow you to build science instruction around your students’ own ideas and questions. As students experience phenomena and ask their own questions, science becomes accessible to all students. Students gain similar experiences with phenomena allowing for inclusive classroom discourse opportunities because lack of experience is not an inhibitor. The students’ wonderings then drive the learning process as students engage in sensemaking around driving questions like, “How can we tell a story without using words?” or “How can we change the way that our toys move?” In this session, participants will experience phenomena, construct a DQB and experience other equitable project-based science strategies, designed for early elementary students, that they can take back to their own classroom. Participants will hear stories from real classrooms and access OER research-based curriculum.

TAKEAWAYS:
Engage in constructing a Driving Question Board (DQB) and other learning experiences designed for early elementary students and reflect on strategies used to support students' figuring out process as they experience and explain phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Amber Richmond (Detroit Public Schools Community District: Detroit, MI), Cory Miller (CREATE for STEM Institute, Michigan State University: East Lansing, MI), Chiara Kirkland (Detroit Public Schools Community District: No City, No State)

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