2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, No Strand, Life Science

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
20 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Ecological Justice: Why Education Is Our Best Defense

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375e


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

From A Silent Spring, The Limits to Growth and Population Bomb of the 1960s and 70s to today’s planetary boundary science, overshoot, and creating a safe and just space for humanity, some would say that “the science is in” and that it is pretty gloomy. Additionally, now in the frenetic information age, humans are overwhelmingly aware of the multitude of crises we face as a species. Our collective mental health is tanking. Knowing our predicament is one thing, but knowing what to do about it is another. Education may be one of our most powerful tools. However, delivery, content, and reach are impaired by multiple factors including politics, economics, religion, and the numerous influences affecting everyone’s social construction of knowledge. This presentation will share examples from the fields of environmental, conservation, and humane education and then focus on the potential promise of comprehensive education for ecological justice.

About the Speaker
Sarah BexellSarah M. Bexell is clinical associate professor with the Graduate School of Social Work and Director of Humane Education with the Institute for Human-Animal Connection, both at the University of Denver, Colorado. Sarah is also a faculty member teaching Animal Protection for the Institute for Humane Education at Antioch University New England and senior advisor to the Education Department of the Chengdu Research Base for Giant Pandas, China. She teaches and does research in the areas of ecological justice, humane education, and animal protection.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Bexell (University of Denver: Denver, CO)

Lucy’s Legacy – Human Evolution for the 21st Century Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The 1974 discovery of the iconic Lucy fossil in Ethiopia changed our understanding of human origins. Almost everyone today knows of Lucy, but over the last 48 years the field of human origins has exploded thanks to new discoveries all over the world as well as critical new developments in the realm of molecular biology. Few biology classes address these advances. However, the tools and techniques students learn in STEM classes have a direct connection to the advances and changes that have shaped modern work with human origins. Attending this session will give you the chance to appreciate the revolution that has occurred since “Lucy” and offer you tools to bring new understanding to your students in ways you can weave into your curriculum in less controversial ways connected to evolution, fossils, DNA, proteomics, genealogy, biogeography, 3D printing, as well as topics related to more recent human evolution (skin color, lactose tolerance, and high-altitude adaptation). As a 32-year K-12 human evolution educator who has been fortunate to work with leaders in the field, I have had a front row seat to many of the milestones of human evolution in the 21st century and I’m eager to share them with you.

TAKEAWAYS:
Since the discovery of Lucy, our understanding of human origins has grown and changed thanks to new discoveries and technologies – participants will learn about these amazing changes and how to integrate these new discoveries into their biology curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
John Mead (St. Mark's School of Texas: Allen, TX)

Including Teachers in Developing Large-Scale Assessments for Science

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Learn about the novel approach taken by Illinois to include teacher voice in developing a statewide three-dimensional science assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about the process of developing a state-wide assessment written by local educators.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Harvey Henson (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL), ANGELA BOX (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: CARTERVILLE, IL)

Dumpster Dive with STEM

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dumpster Dive With STEM Participant Folder

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Connect the human impact of trash pollution to engineering design. Get your students thinking critically and creatively as they collaborate in real-world problem-solving. The global real-world issue of human-generated trash polluting local bodies of water is the main focus of this hands-on session. Using our partnership with the Howard County Conservancy, our students learn about their local watersheds and contribute to a Watershed Report Card. Students see how trash that is often found on our local schoolyards can affect our watershed, and they design a working model for trash removal in a local tributary. Basic coding will be used to design programs that will control sensors and motors through a microcontroller, thus removing the trash from the water source. The model will utilize solar and water power to move the trash into a separate receptacle. Various sensors will also be used to monitor water levels and determine the outcome of the program. This session will allow participants to find ways to increase the environmental stewardship of their students while incorporating engineering design into the science classroom. This project allows authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Design a project that enhances STEM skills in students such as collaboration, curiosity and creative problem solving.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

AP Biology Science Exploration: How to Engage AP Students After the Exam and Increase Community Involvement in STEM

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W187a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
elementary_name_tags.pdf
elementary_science_explorations_instructions.pdf
Science Explorations_NSTA_2022.pdf
student ideas.pdf
student_grading_sheet.doc

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This presentation will include a proven model for allowing elementary students to explore and experience AP Biology content (at their level).

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will take with them a protocol and resources for the successful implementation of an idea of what to do after the AP Biology exam. This allows AP students to explore a topic of interest and share that topic with elementary students.

SPEAKERS:
Scott VanderVeen (Valley Christian High School: San Jose, CA)

Providing actionable feedback to build students’ self-reflection skills

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W181a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Actionable Feedback.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

How many teacher comments on student work are left unread? Or, even if they are read, how useful are they to the student? Can the student positively internalize the feedback and use it to improve their work? Chances are the answer is no! But it doesn’t have to be this way! During this session, participants will learn more effective strategies for giving actionable feedback and methods to help their students utilize feedback to improve their work. First we’ll learn how to ask questions in student feedback and how differently questions are internalized by the student. For example, consider the difference between, “I don’t understand what you mean here,” and “Can you explain in more detail what you meant in this statement?” Then we’ll discover how to make sure teachers' feedback is read and used by students to improve their work. By making self reflection a formalized step in the learning process, teachers provide students opportunities to practice this important skill! Participants will receive a worksheet with feedback tips and tricks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Several methods that can be applied immediately in the classroom, providing feedback encouraging students to be self reflective of their own work.

SPEAKERS:
Regina Borriello (Clifton High School: Edison, NJ)

Incorporating the 3 Rs of Animal Use in High School Science Classes

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

A cross-disciplinary team of teachers, subject matter experts, and curriculum developers have designed resources and materials to facilitate teaching students about the use of animals in scientific research in the United States, as well as Russell and Burch’s 3 Rs principles of replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal use. The materials, which are aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, are geared toward high school science students. The modules can be taught separately or in combination, giving educators flexibility to choose specific content areas to share and explore with their students. During the session, we will present two learning plans: one that introduces students to the 3 Rs principles and how animals are used in scientific research, and another that covers the 3 Rs principles in more depth. We will share information, including teaching plans, learning materials, and performance assessment tasks associated with the curriculum, with session attendees.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will have an opportunity to learn more about the content and activities covered in two lesson plans focused on the use of animals in scientific research in the United States and the 3 Rs principles. Sample lesson plans and associated learning materials, including presentations, articles, and worksheets, will be shared with attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Pam Osenkowski (National Anti-Vivisection Society - BioLEAP: Chicago, IL)

Energizing Your Achievement - Shell Teacher Awards

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Instructional Methods and Teaching Philosophy tips
Shell Awards Requirements
Shell Combined flyer 2022-23.pdf
Shell Programs presentation

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Come start your winning application for the Shell Science Teaching Award, or the Shell Urban Science Educators Development Award. We'll walk through the application step by step and you'll be able to begin your application or nomination form live.

TAKEAWAYS:
Collaborate with past winners and judges to learn how to start your winning application for the Shell Teaching Awards. We'll walk through the application step by step and you'll be able to begin your application or nomination form live.

SPEAKERS:
Amanda Upton (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Melissa Collins (John P. Freeman Optional School: Memphis, TN)

A Cancer Case Study Storyline and Research Lesson

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
A Cancer Storyline Landing Page
Quick access to resources.
A Cancer Storyline Slide Deck

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Enjoy conversation about our research lesson collaboration with the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center EYES (Educators and Youth Enjoy Science) teacher research experience.

TAKEAWAYS:
Authentic teacher research experiences can catalyze students' career interest, authentic classroom inquiry, curriculum development, and relevant professional learning.

SPEAKERS:
Steven Rogg (Notre Dame College Prep: Niles, IL), Pamela Wagner (George Westinghouse College Prep: Chicago, IL)

What the Flip? Where to Start When Flipping Your Classroom.

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W193b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
What the Flip handout.docx
What the flip.pptx

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Participants should come to this session with some ideas/dreams in mind of how they would like their classroom to look. Discussion will get the program rolling. A presentation will be given with some ideas as to a starting point to flipping the classroom as well as some key ideas to making the class time meaningful. Simply taking lecture out of the classroom and inserting worksheets will NOT make flipping a worthwhile experience. Having more time to get students to participate in meaningful learning experiences will make the effort worth it. Plus, it involves less instructor effort in the long run as students are doing most of the work. Participants will be given time to work independently or in groups to come up with ideas as to how to modify historically "typical" science lessons into ones that are more engaging, meet students where they are at, and increase student understanding of key science principles. Presenter will give feedback on ideas. Question and answer time will be provided as well. Sometimes, all it takes is a starting point in order to reinvent one's teaching style and reinvigorate one's passion for teaching.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants who have been wanting to flip their classroom, but don't know where to start will learn basic strategies to incorporate into their classroom to get students doing meaningful learning activities.

SPEAKERS:
Meredith Diehl (Northview High School: Sylvania, OH)

Learning Better Science Practices with Science Fair Projects

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 5


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

A former national science fair judge provides insights on how good titles can improve the odds of winning at science fairs. The poster will describe what the parts of a "good" title are and how teachers can help your students create one.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn the components of a good project title (from an research project on science fairs) and how to help their students develop a good title for their own project.

SPEAKERS:
G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Global Conversations: International Film Festival and Share-a-thon

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 21


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

In this self-directed session, you will be able to: Interact with educators in face-to-face poster presentations; Watch short video submissions from educators around the world; and Participate in hands-on/minds-on, takeaway learning experiences.

TAKEAWAYS:
Science education occurs everywhere on this planet. We can get ideas and best practices from collegues around the world.

SPEAKERS:
Alison Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

EVOLUTIONARY MOVERS & SHAKERS: Researching, Debating, and Ranking the “Top 20” Evolutionary Scientists of All Time.

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 26


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Don’t debate evolution – Rather dig deeper into evolution by having your students research, debate, & rank the top evolutionary thinkers of all time.

TAKEAWAYS:
Rather than stage a debate over evolution which tends to be fraught with misinformation, have your students debate & rank the top figures in the history of evolutionary thought. They can then compare their ranking with that of a group of evolutionary experts.

Three Easy Steps to Adding Inquiry to Labs

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 14


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Creating inquiry activities doesn't have to require re-inventing the wheel. There are simple adjustments you can make to build inquiry into any activity.

TAKEAWAYS:
Three easy ways to build inquiry into traditional "cookbook" activites.

SPEAKERS:
Regina Borriello (Clifton High School: Edison, NJ)

Game Theory & Escape Rooms

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 31


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Escape-room activities offer promise for fun and function in developing social problem-solving skills. Participants will learn implementation and design strategies for their own ER environments.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how escape rooms help to engage students in dynamic learning environments and how to begin developing up your own activities.

SPEAKERS:
Joy Barnes-Johnson (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Mridula Bajaj (Mount Laurel Schools: Mount Laurel, NJ), Shefali Mehta (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ)

Tick-Borne Diseases and One Health: Connecting Humans, Animals, and the Environment

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VFJ7YGB
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VFJ7YGB
Ticks NSTA 2022.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Investigate the spread of tick-borne diseases in humans and animals. Experience hands-on/minds-on NGSS-focused lessons related to One Health, the connections between human, animal, and environmental health.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn about hands-on/minds-on NGSS-focused lessons related to One Health and engage in three-dimensional activities that focus on the science practices of analyzing data and constructing explanations.

SPEAKERS:
Lisa Brosnick (SUNY Buffalo State College: Buffalo, NY), Dina Markowitz (University of Rochester: Rochester, NY)

Engaging with Your STEM Ecosystem Through After-School Programs: Lessons from Science Olympiad

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W179b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

A challenge that STEM education presents to educators is how to stay current in an ever-evolving field to accurately represent and engage their students with new topics, activities, and careers. Too often STEM teachers become locked-in on a set of topics, activities, and careers because of the resources and opportunities to which they have access. After-school programs, and their ability to foster partnerships within a school’s larger STEM ecosystem, are one mechanism to open up STEM programs within schools to new topics, activities, and careers while offering avenues for professional growth and learning for the classroom teacher. By introducing the Science Olympiad program and the strategies used by our school participants for over three decades to build partnerships, connect to their STEM ecosystem, and expand learning we intend to help attendees draw parallels to their STEM ecosystems and their after-school programs. Building off of this information, attendees will analyze and discuss ways their STEM ecosystem can contribute to their STEM program, develop approaches for asking ecosystem members for support, and recognize opportunities to grow their STEM program through after-school programs. The session will close with a discussion of attendees’ specific challenges and issues ensuring attendees leave with actionable solutions.

TAKEAWAYS:
The big takeaway from this session will attendees examining their STEM ecosystem to identify potential partners who align with their programming and can support student learning.

SPEAKERS:
John Loehr (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL)

Computational Thinking Using Computer Simulations in High School Biology

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Computational Thinking in Biology Powerpoint Final.pdf
NSTA CT-S Student Lesson Word FINAL.pdf
NSTA CT-S Teacher Lesson Plan FINAL.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

While the NGSS emphasizes the science and engineering practice of computational thinking, there is less familiarity and support for the implementation of this practice compared to other practices. In this session, high school biology teachers will learn how to recognize if a task requires computational thinking or not by analyzing a set of tasks. They will learn how to promote computational thinking in their classrooms by engaging with a newly developed computer simulation. This freely available simulation is based on a real-world phenomenon and designed to address specific performance expectations in biology. Teachers will explore the simulation as learners first, engaging with it as their students would. Then they will reflect on how they used computational thinking to explain the phenomenon. Teachers will leave the session with access to the simulation, suggestions for lesson plans, ideas for incorporating the activity into their curricula, and strategies for utilizing the simulation with all learners in their classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to promote the science and engineering practice of computational thinking in the high school biology classroom. Participants will be introduced to a freely accessible computer simulation (and suggested lesson plans) based on a real-world phenomenon designed to address performance expectations in biology.

SPEAKERS:
Wendy Jackson (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA), Maia Binding (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA), Ben Koo (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA)

Brain-Based Instruction: Using Cognitive Psychology to Boost Science Learning

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Cognitive science has identified flexible and often counterintuitive cognitive strategies that boost student learning. Teachers will learn how to implement these techniques within their classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to apply multiple practical, flexible, and research-based cognitive strategies, including retrieving information from memory, distributing practice across time, scaffolding, and mixing together different examples, within their own classrooms to improve student learning.

SPEAKERS:
Jonathan Tullis (The University of Arizona: Tucson, AZ)

Designing Escape Boxes

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

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