NASCAR 2022-23
 

2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 6 results

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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Science + Engineering + Math = Parachute STEM Activity

McCormick Place - W181a

The basic physical science principles of gravitational force and air resistance are explored as students design, build, test, and evaluate parachutes. K-W-L charts are used to assess students’ knowledge of the engineering design process and the scientific method. The book, “Mercedes and the Chocolate Pilot” by Margot Theis Ravin, is read to students and they discuss whether the pilot acted like an engineer as he wanted to share sweets with children during the Berlin Airlift. The students are presented with a problem, getting food and water to islanders whose homes and roads have been damaged by hurricanes. Simple materials such as paper napkins, paper towels, crocheting thread, and paper clips are used to build the parachutes. The students use the five ‘E’s’: engagement, exploration, explanation, evaluation, and elaboration as they compare their various parachute models. Students learn that air contains particles, and it is these particles that place forces on bodies moving in the air and counteract the force of gravity. Students use math in the analysis of their models. Students learn that models representing parachutes can be designed in many ways and may behave differently when tested. Students learn the many ways engineering and science are used to explore and explain nature and are employed in manufacturing and technology processes.

Takeaways: Student groups learn that the engineering design process and the scientific method are circular processes as they design, build, test, and evaluate a parachute model then improve it.

Speakers

Suzanne Cunningham (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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The Egg Drop Meets 2020

McCormick Place - W176c

Participants will design and test a vessel that will land an egg dropped from a substantial heights without breaking the egg. Participants will use a variety of materials to provide the softest landing possible. Participants will employ technology to assist them in designing their vessels and shape their final methods.

Takeaways: Design and test an egg vessel with real time data. Analyze live data to better design a successful egg drop vessel. Experience the engineering design process. - Using technology to test prototypes. -employing the engineering design process. -applying modern technology to past challenges.

Speakers

Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY), Todd Graba (Crystal Lake South High School: Crystal Lake, IL)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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NASA Elementary GLOBE: Water Exploration Experience

McCormick Place - W178b

This is an inquiry-based hands-on NASA STEM lesson based on a free storybook The Mystery at Willow Creek. All participants can learn from this experience regardless of level. The STEM activities incorporate cooperative learning and exploration. The session activity is versatile and can be used as a standalone or incorporated into complex units. The participants will receive 4 mystery samples. They will use their senses and pH paper to identify the samples with “pollution” and the one that is water. The PowerPoint will include the videos and activities including the tips and pointers and will be made available to all participants. The teacher’s guide is available online at no cost on http://www.globe.gov/web/elementary-globe. The teacher’s guide includes the free storybooks, activities, material lists, Instructional strategies, assessments, and cross-curricular implementation. Session Overview: 10 min- STEM Engagement strategies: Getting Organized 5 min- The Importance of Fresh Water 10 min- Introduce “Discoveries at Willow Creek” storybook 20 min- Activity: “Water Detectives Activity” –Using our senses 10 min – Reporting out -Why we are collecting water data? 5 min- Q and A

Takeaways: NASA Elementary GLOBE has free storybooks with three or more STEM Activities each integrating the Core Standards with the Science standards. The materials are translated into 5 languages. Exploring the environment with a field experience ( Water Walk) will engage students in real-world culturally relevant problem-solving.

Speakers

Susan Kohler (NASA Glenn Research Center: Cleveland, OH)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Artemis: NASA's Missions to the Moon & Mars

McCormick Place - W186c

Attendees will be provided with a high-level overview of NASA’s Artemis Missions to the Moon and Mars, Next Generation Science Standards, and gain insights on how Engineering Design fits within the NGSS. This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Next Gen STEM - Moon to Mars Educator Guide titled, "Landing Humans on the Moon" (https://www.nasa.gov/stem-ed-resources/landing-humans-on-the-moon.html) which is part of a series of standards-aligned educator guides designed to help students reach their potential to join the next-generation STEM workforce and learn about sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. The focus of the “Safe Landing on the Lunar Surface” activity engages participants to understand how a spacecraft’s engines can provide downward thrust to counteract the force of gravity not only at launch, but also during a landing to slow its descent. Utilizing the engineering design process attendees will use household materials to better understand the difficulties in landing a lander on the surface of a terrestrial body that does not have an atmosphere (no atmospheric braking, no use of parachutes, and no aerodynamic control surfaces). Participants will design, build, and improve a model of a lunar lander that can slow its descent using the downward thrust of a balloon; graph the speed with respect to elevation of a model lunar lander.

Takeaways: 1. Attendee will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom to help students learn about sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. 2. Attendees will gain hand on minds on experience with implementing NASA STEM engagement activities in their classroom. Then, using engineering design principles, attendees will mirror the process that NASA engineers follow to brainstorm a human lander design, ultimately building an actual model that they will test. 3. Participants will gain insights into the difficulties in landing a lander on the surface of a terrestrial body that does not have an atmosphere (no atmospheric braking, no use of parachutes, and no aerodynamic control surfaces).

Speakers

LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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NASA STEM: Computational Thinking: Crew Transportation with Orion

McCormick Place - W175a

The free NASA STEM lesson plans introduce the practice of computational thinking and include elements of a real NASA mission. NASA’s Artemis program will return humans to the lunar surface for the first time since 1972, the year of the agency's last Apollo moon landing. This Educator Guide provides four standards-aligned activities to help students learn about NASA's Orion spacecraft that will take astronauts to the Moon and beyond. In this session, we will design and build a crew module model that will secure two 2-cm astronaut figures during a drop test. The PowerPoint will be available to all participants. The PowerPoint will include the videos and activities including the tips and pointers. Session Outline: 5 min - Welcome and Introduction to NASA Artemis Mission 10 min- STEM Engagement strategies and culturally relevant teaching 10 min- Introducing the Engineering Design Challenge 20 min- Teams Design a Crew Vehicle 10 min- Testing the Crew Vehicle 5 min- Reviewing the Resources and Q and A https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/np-2020-02-2805-hq.pdf

Takeaways: NASA provides free educational resources that include educator guides with standards-aligned activities to help students use computational thinking while including elements of real NASA missions.

Speakers

Susan Kohler (NASA Glenn Research Center: Cleveland, OH)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Designing Escape Boxes

McCormick Place - W183b

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

Takeaways: Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

Speakers

Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.