2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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Pathway/Course

FILTERS APPLIED:Hands-On Workshop, No Strand, Physical Science

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
17 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Dog Mode Design Challenge

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dog Mode Slide Deck

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Introducing students to real-world engineering problems is a key component to engaging them in the science classroom. In this project, students solve the problem of saving pets from a hot car. Many students are aware of this issue and would have many ideas on how this could be achieved. This projects gives them the tools to help solve such a problem by building a model and finding a solution. Participants in this session will get to build the model themselves to see how information from sensors (input) can determine what should be done (output) through simple lines of code. No coding or engineering experience is needed, just imagination and logical thinking. Projects like these can expose students to STEM Careers. The exposure to coding and engineering design can also get them interested in doing more in the STEM field.

TAKEAWAYS:
Solve a real-work problem with coding and engineering design - no prior experience needed.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Engineering Severe Weather Solutions

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Sever Weather Slide Deck

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Human activities have caused changes in global temperature and weather patterns. This generation of students will need to understand climate science in order to adapt to this changing environment. In this session, participants will explore a project in which students incorporate engineering and basic coding - no experience necessary. We will use micro:bit technology to connect basic coding commands to collect authentic data using embedded sensors. Participants will use this collected data to modify design solutions based on human vulnerabilities to severe weather. Participants will find ways to expose their students to the engineering capabilities needed to solve problems. This project allows students to compare design solutions to identify which is best for the problem at hand and experience the interactive process of evaluating solutions. This project allows for the authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Use technology to expose students to coding and engineering design solutions for severe weather.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Science + Engineering + Math = Parachute STEM Activity

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The basic physical science principles of gravitational force and air resistance are explored as students design, build, test, and evaluate parachutes. K-W-L charts are used to assess students’ knowledge of the engineering design process and the scientific method. The book, “Mercedes and the Chocolate Pilot” by Margot Theis Ravin, is read to students and they discuss whether the pilot acted like an engineer as he wanted to share sweets with children during the Berlin Airlift. The students are presented with a problem, getting food and water to islanders whose homes and roads have been damaged by hurricanes. Simple materials such as paper napkins, paper towels, crocheting thread, and paper clips are used to build the parachutes. The students use the five ‘E’s’: engagement, exploration, explanation, evaluation, and elaboration as they compare their various parachute models. Students learn that air contains particles, and it is these particles that place forces on bodies moving in the air and counteract the force of gravity. Students use math in the analysis of their models. Students learn that models representing parachutes can be designed in many ways and may behave differently when tested. Students learn the many ways engineering and science are used to explore and explain nature and are employed in manufacturing and technology processes.

TAKEAWAYS:
Student groups learn that the engineering design process and the scientific method are circular processes as they design, build, test, and evaluate a parachute model then improve it.

SPEAKERS:
Suzanne Cunningham (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN)

Experience a Unique Perspective of What We Are Seeing When Comparing Aerial Earth Photos with Various Images of Celestial Objects of Our Universe

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W186b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Agenda NSTA National Conference Chicago, July 21, 2022.docx
Celestial Images and Earth Objects.pdf
Data Worksheet for Comparing and Contrasting Images.docx
Data Worksheet for Geology and Art.docx
letter for Educators July 21, 2022 workshop.docx
Possible Connections to the Next Generation Science Standards.docx

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

An open-ended  investigation using the basic elements of the visual arts to compare images of Earth and celestial objects of our universe. Examples of student comparisons and a packet of resources will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will: 1. use images from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and compare them to Earth images taken by Yann Arthus-Bertrand; 2. compare and contrast, using the basic elements in art and the properties of matter used in science, to describe each object; and 3. continue to create their own comparisons using the images made available in the workshop.

SPEAKERS:
Sally Jensen (Retired Educator: Campton, NH)

Exploration Generation: Sensemaking in Rocketry from AIAA, Estes Rockets, and NSTA

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Exploration Generation: Sensemaking in Rocketry Collection

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session will introduce participants to the Exploration Generation Middle School NSTA Playlist. It provides equitable STEM experiences to students and increases educator confidence in teaching rocketry. This two-lesson playlist brings Sensemaking to rocketry by cultivating student curiosity about rockets to drive learning about science ideas related to physics topics. Participants will investigate forces through hands-on engagement, while also learning about rocket safety. Learn how to develop critical skills within your students to prepare them for the careers of tomorrow.

TAKEAWAYS:
The excitement and curiosity generated by model rocket launches can be used to drive student learning about a variety of physical science ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Nicole Bayeur (Estes Industries: , United States)

Meet Me in the Middle, Lite: A Share-a-Thon

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
UIC Teacher Fellows Info
Informational Flyer on Teacher Fellows program to develop classroom learning companion robots

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Engage in a variety of activities, collect information and resources, and network with middle level leaders. Discover new ideas and materials that you can use next week.

TAKEAWAYS:
The participants will network with other middle level science educators and leaders to discover and engage in activities that will expand their knowledge and be usable in all aspects of their work.

SPEAKERS:
Mary Lou Lipscomb (National Middle Level Science Teachers Association: Naperville, IL), Alison Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Carey Dieleman (National Science Teaching Association: No City, No State), Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ), Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA), Suzanne Cunningham (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN), Katy Garvey (The Source for Learning, Inc.: Reston, VA), Nicole Green (Animalearn: Jenkintown, PA), Joseph Michaelis (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Kim Nagle (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Anne Schoeffler (Seton Catholic School: Hudson, OH), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Alison Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Corydon Strawser (Lake Nona Middle School: Orlando, FL), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA), Barbara Phillips-Bredlow (Northeast Nodaway School District: Ravenwood, MO), Dawn Konieczny (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Erin Towns (Edward Little High School: Auburn, ME)

NGSS-Focused Summative Classroom Assessments of Three-Dimensional Learning

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NGSS Summative Assessments_NSTA_Chicago_2022.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Explore classroom-tested benchmark assessments and scoring guides you can use to assess students’ three-dimensional learning related to middle school performance expectations.

TAKEAWAYS:
Educators will learn about a comprehensive set of free, summative benchmark 3-D assessments designed to be used in any NGSS-focused middle school classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Maia Binding (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA), Wendy Jackson (The Lawrence Hall of Science: Berkeley, CA)

Modeling Investigation of How Quarks Obtain Mass Through the Interaction of the Higgs Boson

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Each attendee will receive materials and instructions to construct a Higgs Boson. Dice and investigative procedure are included to determine the mass of six quarks.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. How to take an abstract concept and create concrete hands-on investigations; 2. Suggestions to go from teacher-centered to a student centered-curriculum; and 3. The importance of looking for trends, patterns, and regularities for modeling.

SPEAKERS:
Gary Schiltz (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Naperville, IL)

The Quantitative and Qualitative Modeling of the Doppler Effect

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The first 50 attendees will be be given the materials (circluar rings, rulers, and paper) to model the Doppler effect. Attendees will need a calculator for the quantitative portion of the workshop.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. How to take an abstract concept and create a concrete hands-on investigation; 2. Suggestions to go from teacher-centered to a student centered-curriculum; and 3. The importance of looking for trends, patterns, and regularities for modeling.

SPEAKERS:
Gary Schiltz (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Naperville, IL)

How to Give Children Opportunities to Use Science and Literacy to Make Sense of the World Around Them

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session introduces a way to create learning experiences that will give students opportunities to talk, read, and write in the service of sensemaking as they use the DCIs, CCs, and SEPs to explain natural phenomena.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to ensure students have access to science in grades 3–5 by designing investigations that promote and support the use of literacy skills in the service of sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

NASA Space Technology: Robotics and the International Space Station

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Learning Launchers: Robotics (https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/stem-on-station/learning_launchers_robotics) teacher toolkit part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help bring the International Space Station into the classroom. This session will focus on the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity that engages participants to build and test a robotic-like hand and understand how NASA uses robotic explorers to collect information about places where humans cannot travel. After watching videos "Robotics and the International Space Station" & "Benefits For Humanity: From Space to Surgery" participants will work in teams to construct a robotic-like hand and test their robotic hand by picking up an empty soda can or other lightweight objects. The “I Want to Hold Your Hand Activity” is aligned to national standards for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) (i.e., NGSS, ISTE). The focus of the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity ties Engineering Design and NGSS science and engineering practices of defining problems, developing models, and planning and carrying out investigations. This session connects participants to how NASA uses robots in many ways as well as benefit humanity with its robots’ doing science and experiments aboard the International Space Station.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Attendees will gain hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM engagement activity in their classroom using everyday materials that encourages students to construct a robotic-like hand and demonstrate how data are collected when using robotic technology. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how humans and robots are working hand in hand to expand the horizons of space exploration and how robotic research that has helped make advances in medicine, auto manufacturing, among other things. Without robotics, major accomplishments like the building the International Space Station, repairing satellites in space, and exploring other worlds would not be possible.

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

Creating phenomena for YOUR students

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The use of natural phenomena and driving questions to motivate student learning are key in the NGSS. With so many different science phenomena being posted for use in the classroom it can be difficult to determine what makes a good phenomenon and if that phenomena would be appropriate in all educational settings. The focus of this hands-on workshop is to give science teachers the tools needed to find, evaluate and use phenomena and driving questions for Performance Expectations that are consistent with the culture of their classroom. We will first explore and evaluate different phenomena used to teach the NGSS from various sources (websites, kits, science texts). Then we will apply cognitive learning theory and practices to those same phenomena and evaluate them considering different classroom cultures. Finally, participants will choose and discourse about alternative phenomena which might be used given different classroom cultures. The ultimate goal is to help science teachers evaluate and choose phenomena and create driving questions which can drive excellent science pedagogy in THEIR classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Science phenomena and driving questions need to be tailored to the real-world of students in YOUR classroom

SPEAKERS:
Rob Keys (Cornerstone University: Grand Rapids, MI)

Artemis: NASA's Missions to the Moon & Mars

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W186c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Attendees will be provided with a high-level overview of NASA’s Artemis Missions to the Moon and Mars, Next Generation Science Standards, and gain insights on how Engineering Design fits within the NGSS. This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Next Gen STEM - Moon to Mars Educator Guide titled, "Landing Humans on the Moon" (https://www.nasa.gov/stem-ed-resources/landing-humans-on-the-moon.html) which is part of a series of standards-aligned educator guides designed to help students reach their potential to join the next-generation STEM workforce and learn about sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. The focus of the “Safe Landing on the Lunar Surface” activity engages participants to understand how a spacecraft’s engines can provide downward thrust to counteract the force of gravity not only at launch, but also during a landing to slow its descent. Utilizing the engineering design process attendees will use household materials to better understand the difficulties in landing a lander on the surface of a terrestrial body that does not have an atmosphere (no atmospheric braking, no use of parachutes, and no aerodynamic control surfaces). Participants will design, build, and improve a model of a lunar lander that can slow its descent using the downward thrust of a balloon; graph the speed with respect to elevation of a model lunar lander.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendee will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom to help students learn about sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. 2. Attendees will gain hand on minds on experience with implementing NASA STEM engagement activities in their classroom. Then, using engineering design principles, attendees will mirror the process that NASA engineers follow to brainstorm a human lander design, ultimately building an actual model that they will test. 3. Participants will gain insights into the difficulties in landing a lander on the surface of a terrestrial body that does not have an atmosphere (no atmospheric braking, no use of parachutes, and no aerodynamic control surfaces).

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

NESTA and SSSA: Know Soil, Know Life—Dig into the Connections!

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W196c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

More than just dirt, soil is vital to life on the planet. Join us as we explore the how’s and why’s of the soil-life connection.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn the fundamental linkages between soils and life while being immersed in numerous activities and demonstrations that support classroom integration of soil topics.

SPEAKERS:
Clay Robinson (CRC Consulting: No City, No State), Susan Chapman (Soil Science Society of America: Madison, WI)

NASA STEM: Computational Thinking: Crew Transportation with Orion

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The free NASA STEM lesson plans introduce the practice of computational thinking and include elements of a real NASA mission. NASA’s Artemis program will return humans to the lunar surface for the first time since 1972, the year of the agency's last Apollo moon landing. This Educator Guide provides four standards-aligned activities to help students learn about NASA's Orion spacecraft that will take astronauts to the Moon and beyond. In this session, we will design and build a crew module model that will secure two 2-cm astronaut figures during a drop test. The PowerPoint will be available to all participants. The PowerPoint will include the videos and activities including the tips and pointers. Session Outline: 5 min - Welcome and Introduction to NASA Artemis Mission 10 min- STEM Engagement strategies and culturally relevant teaching 10 min- Introducing the Engineering Design Challenge 20 min- Teams Design a Crew Vehicle 10 min- Testing the Crew Vehicle 5 min- Reviewing the Resources and Q and A https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/np-2020-02-2805-hq.pdf

TAKEAWAYS:
NASA provides free educational resources that include educator guides with standards-aligned activities to help students use computational thinking while including elements of real NASA missions.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Kohler (NASA Glenn Research Center: Cleveland, OH)

Designing Escape Boxes

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

NASA's Newest X-plane: "X-57 -- It's Electrifying!"

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W193a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Did you know that every U.S. aircraft flying today, and every U.S. air traffic control facility, uses NASA-developed technology in some way? Participants in this session will gain insights into how NASA Aeronautics work to make aviation truly sustainable by reducing delays and environmental impacts, transforming aviation efficiency and safety, while reducing noise, fuel use, harmful emissions, and ultimately transform the way we fly. NASA’s X-57 Maxwell is an experimental aircraft designed to test operating multiple electric motors for use in turning propellers – an idea known as “distributed electric propulsion.” This session highlights an activity from NASA’s “X-57 Electric Airplane: STEM Learning Module” (https://www.nasa.gov/aeroresearch/stem/X57 ) part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help students learn about NASA’s X-57 Maxwell and the science behind electric propulsion. This session will focus on the “X-57 Maxwell: Circuits Activity Guide” that engages participants to build a light-up paper helicopter by creating a “parallel circuit” that uses copper foil tape, two LED lights, and a battery. This session’s goals are to demonstrate that an all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly. Session participants will understand that knowledge gained from the X-57 Maxwell research will help engineers design future electric-powered aircraft for everything from urban air mobility to moving passengers and cargo between nearby cities.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM activity in their classroom that encourages students to create a parallel circuit on a paper helicopter as an introduction to circuitry and propulsion. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how NASA’s X-57 Maxwell all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly while gaining a better understanding of the STEM concepts of energy transfer, and the physical science of pressure and aerodynamics.

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

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