2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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Pathway/Course

FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Presentation, No Strand, Physical Science

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
8 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Including Teachers in Developing Large-Scale Assessments for Science

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Learn about the novel approach taken by Illinois to include teacher voice in developing a statewide three-dimensional science assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about the process of developing a state-wide assessment written by local educators.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Harvey Henson (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL), ANGELA BOX (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: CARTERVILLE, IL)

Preparing for the 2023 Annular and 2024 Total Solar Eclipses

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Learn about the many resources available to help plan your viewing of the 2023 annular and 2024 total solar eclipses.

TAKEAWAYS:
In order to see the maximum coverage of the Sun in a solar eclipse, the most important detail is a clear sky and fewer clouds. According to current climate data, the best locations to observe each solar eclipse will be reviewed.

SPEAKERS:
Richard Thomas (Beacon High School: Naples, FL)

Providing actionable feedback to build students’ self-reflection skills

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W181a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Actionable Feedback.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

How many teacher comments on student work are left unread? Or, even if they are read, how useful are they to the student? Can the student positively internalize the feedback and use it to improve their work? Chances are the answer is no! But it doesn’t have to be this way! During this session, participants will learn more effective strategies for giving actionable feedback and methods to help their students utilize feedback to improve their work. First we’ll learn how to ask questions in student feedback and how differently questions are internalized by the student. For example, consider the difference between, “I don’t understand what you mean here,” and “Can you explain in more detail what you meant in this statement?” Then we’ll discover how to make sure teachers' feedback is read and used by students to improve their work. By making self reflection a formalized step in the learning process, teachers provide students opportunities to practice this important skill! Participants will receive a worksheet with feedback tips and tricks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Several methods that can be applied immediately in the classroom, providing feedback encouraging students to be self reflective of their own work.

SPEAKERS:
Regina Borriello (Clifton High School: Edison, NJ)

Planning More Accessible Science Lessons with Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Claims and evidence.jpg
Debate.jpg
Final Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pptx
Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pdf
Speaking like a scientist.pdf - Inv. Part 1.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

In this presentation we will start with an existing basic physical science lesson that uses disciplinary core ideas on electricity, the engineering practice of making a model by constructing a basic electrical circuit, and the cross-cutting concept of cause and effect (closing the circuit starts current flow and turns on the light). We will then modify it using Universal Design for Learning (UDL) so it is more accessible, especially for students with disabilities. UDL encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson and gives students several ways to acquire the lesson knowledge, Multiple means of expression allows the students several choices in how they can “show what they know” and multiple means of engagement offers learners offers appropriate challenges to get students interested and motivated. Planning or modifying lessons using UDL not only makes lessons more accessible, but it also makes lessons more engaging for all students in inclusive classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
1) Universal Design for Learning (UDL) encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson. Use of UDL makes lessons more engaging for all students. 2) Applying UDL (Universal Design for Learning) will make the lesson more accessible, especially for students with special needs. 3) You may start with a lesson you already have. It is not necessary to develop a lesson from scratch when using UDL.

SPEAKERS:
Mary O'Donnell (Penn State University), Gargi Adhikari (Holland Brook School/Readington Township Schools: Whitehouse Station, NJ)

Using Historic Articles As Case Studies In Physics

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W179b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Older science magazines (from the early 1900’s) are replete with articles and photos of unusual inventions and ideas which can be transformed into case studies that elicit active discussions in science classrooms. Magazines like Popular Science and Science and Invention often had articles on proposed scientific inventions, their ‘technology of the future’, that were never successfully produced. We use their proposals as the basis for mini-case studies in physics classes. Ideas like rocket mail, houses powered by radium, and jumping over Niagara Falls in the family sedan were all proposed in the first half of the 20th century. Determining whether or not the proposals were scientifically viable makes for engaging physics activities. In addition, students can look at aspects other than the pure science: the proposed idea might be scientifically feasible, but would it be prohibitively expensive or damage the environment or the users? Additionally, students can explore how historically the ideas might have made sense (e.g. a radium house in 1900 would have been thought of differently than it is now). In this talk we will give participants ideas of where to find free articles, work through several case studies, and give examples of many others.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn ways to implement case studies based on historical scientific innovations.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Brown (University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg: Greensburg, PA)

Energizing Your Achievement - Shell Teacher Awards

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Instructional Methods and Teaching Philosophy tips
Shell Awards Requirements
Shell Combined flyer 2022-23.pdf
Shell Programs presentation

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Come start your winning application for the Shell Science Teaching Award, or the Shell Urban Science Educators Development Award. We'll walk through the application step by step and you'll be able to begin your application or nomination form live.

TAKEAWAYS:
Collaborate with past winners and judges to learn how to start your winning application for the Shell Teaching Awards. We'll walk through the application step by step and you'll be able to begin your application or nomination form live.

SPEAKERS:
Amanda Upton (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Melissa Collins (John P. Freeman Optional School: Memphis, TN)

Engaging with Your STEM Ecosystem Through After-School Programs: Lessons from Science Olympiad

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W179b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

A challenge that STEM education presents to educators is how to stay current in an ever-evolving field to accurately represent and engage their students with new topics, activities, and careers. Too often STEM teachers become locked-in on a set of topics, activities, and careers because of the resources and opportunities to which they have access. After-school programs, and their ability to foster partnerships within a school’s larger STEM ecosystem, are one mechanism to open up STEM programs within schools to new topics, activities, and careers while offering avenues for professional growth and learning for the classroom teacher. By introducing the Science Olympiad program and the strategies used by our school participants for over three decades to build partnerships, connect to their STEM ecosystem, and expand learning we intend to help attendees draw parallels to their STEM ecosystems and their after-school programs. Building off of this information, attendees will analyze and discuss ways their STEM ecosystem can contribute to their STEM program, develop approaches for asking ecosystem members for support, and recognize opportunities to grow their STEM program through after-school programs. The session will close with a discussion of attendees’ specific challenges and issues ensuring attendees leave with actionable solutions.

TAKEAWAYS:
The big takeaway from this session will attendees examining their STEM ecosystem to identify potential partners who align with their programming and can support student learning.

SPEAKERS:
John Loehr (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL)

Brain-Based Instruction: Using Cognitive Psychology to Boost Science Learning

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Cognitive science has identified flexible and often counterintuitive cognitive strategies that boost student learning. Teachers will learn how to implement these techniques within their classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to apply multiple practical, flexible, and research-based cognitive strategies, including retrieving information from memory, distributing practice across time, scaffolding, and mixing together different examples, within their own classrooms to improve student learning.

SPEAKERS:
Jonathan Tullis (The University of Arizona: Tucson, AZ)

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