2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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Rooms and times subject to change.
22 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Dumpster Dive with STEM

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Dumpster Dive With STEM Participant Folder

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Connect the human impact of trash pollution to engineering design. Get your students thinking critically and creatively as they collaborate in real-world problem-solving. The global real-world issue of human-generated trash polluting local bodies of water is the main focus of this hands-on session. Using our partnership with the Howard County Conservancy, our students learn about their local watersheds and contribute to a Watershed Report Card. Students see how trash that is often found on our local schoolyards can affect our watershed, and they design a working model for trash removal in a local tributary. Basic coding will be used to design programs that will control sensors and motors through a microcontroller, thus removing the trash from the water source. The model will utilize solar and water power to move the trash into a separate receptacle. Various sensors will also be used to monitor water levels and determine the outcome of the program. This session will allow participants to find ways to increase the environmental stewardship of their students while incorporating engineering design into the science classroom. This project allows authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

TAKEAWAYS:
Design a project that enhances STEM skills in students such as collaboration, curiosity and creative problem solving.

SPEAKERS:
Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Built for Success: Utilizing Teams to Improve Informal Science Opportunities

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W178a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA Presentation - Brian Kutsch

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Informal science learning opportunities can be so much more than a trip to the zoo or museum. The resources available at informal learning organizations can greatly strengthen or supplement those at formal learning institutions. Collaboration is key to achieving such results. In many cases, those partnerships are strengthened through the creation of formalized teams or committees. Quite often, that’s where the struggle begins. Frequently, teams are not structured to react quickly to changes and they don’t mature in a manner that provides stability as they age. Whether starting from scratch or reenergizing an existing team, it’s important to recruit members with the right skills and resources, engage them effectively and layout a structure that allows them to succeed… even during times when you can’t be there to lead them. The guidance discussed in this session will provide attendees with successful tips and K-12 examples that they can take with them as they improve informal science in their communities.

TAKEAWAYS:
Tips on building teams from scratch, reorganizing existing teams and laying the path for continued success.

SPEAKERS:
Brian Kutsch (National Science Teaching Association, eCYBERMISSION)

Providing actionable feedback to build students’ self-reflection skills

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W181a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Actionable Feedback.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

How many teacher comments on student work are left unread? Or, even if they are read, how useful are they to the student? Can the student positively internalize the feedback and use it to improve their work? Chances are the answer is no! But it doesn’t have to be this way! During this session, participants will learn more effective strategies for giving actionable feedback and methods to help their students utilize feedback to improve their work. First we’ll learn how to ask questions in student feedback and how differently questions are internalized by the student. For example, consider the difference between, “I don’t understand what you mean here,” and “Can you explain in more detail what you meant in this statement?” Then we’ll discover how to make sure teachers' feedback is read and used by students to improve their work. By making self reflection a formalized step in the learning process, teachers provide students opportunities to practice this important skill! Participants will receive a worksheet with feedback tips and tricks.

TAKEAWAYS:
Several methods that can be applied immediately in the classroom, providing feedback encouraging students to be self reflective of their own work.

SPEAKERS:
Regina Borriello (Clifton High School: Edison, NJ)

Incorporating the 3 Rs of Animal Use in High School Science Classes

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

A cross-disciplinary team of teachers, subject matter experts, and curriculum developers have designed resources and materials to facilitate teaching students about the use of animals in scientific research in the United States, as well as Russell and Burch’s 3 Rs principles of replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal use. The materials, which are aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, are geared toward high school science students. The modules can be taught separately or in combination, giving educators flexibility to choose specific content areas to share and explore with their students. During the session, we will present two learning plans: one that introduces students to the 3 Rs principles and how animals are used in scientific research, and another that covers the 3 Rs principles in more depth. We will share information, including teaching plans, learning materials, and performance assessment tasks associated with the curriculum, with session attendees.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will have an opportunity to learn more about the content and activities covered in two lesson plans focused on the use of animals in scientific research in the United States and the 3 Rs principles. Sample lesson plans and associated learning materials, including presentations, articles, and worksheets, will be shared with attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Pam Osenkowski (National Anti-Vivisection Society - BioLEAP: Chicago, IL)

Planning More Accessible Science Lessons with Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Claims and evidence.jpg
Debate.jpg
Final Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pptx
Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pdf
Speaking like a scientist.pdf - Inv. Part 1.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

In this presentation we will start with an existing basic physical science lesson that uses disciplinary core ideas on electricity, the engineering practice of making a model by constructing a basic electrical circuit, and the cross-cutting concept of cause and effect (closing the circuit starts current flow and turns on the light). We will then modify it using Universal Design for Learning (UDL) so it is more accessible, especially for students with disabilities. UDL encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson and gives students several ways to acquire the lesson knowledge, Multiple means of expression allows the students several choices in how they can “show what they know” and multiple means of engagement offers learners offers appropriate challenges to get students interested and motivated. Planning or modifying lessons using UDL not only makes lessons more accessible, but it also makes lessons more engaging for all students in inclusive classrooms.

TAKEAWAYS:
1) Universal Design for Learning (UDL) encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson. Use of UDL makes lessons more engaging for all students. 2) Applying UDL (Universal Design for Learning) will make the lesson more accessible, especially for students with special needs. 3) You may start with a lesson you already have. It is not necessary to develop a lesson from scratch when using UDL.

SPEAKERS:
Mary O'Donnell (Penn State University), Gargi Adhikari (Holland Brook School/Readington Township Schools: Whitehouse Station, NJ)

CMU CS Academy: Free Python Courses and Teacher Tools for the CS and STEM Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W175a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
CMU CS Academy Free Python Courses for Middle School and High School

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Come learn about a free CS curriculum for teachers with Carnegie Mellon University's CS Academy: Creative and Exiting Tools for STEM Classrooms Using Python.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to create your accounts and the different types of Python courses available, all free of charge. You can use the curriculum immediately upon account creation for small projects or entire classes.

SPEAKERS:
Sofia De Jesus (Carnegie Mellon University: Pittsburgh, PA)

Putting the A into STEM

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The main goal of this presentation is to help teachers enhance curriculum choices that enrich students lives by integrating the visual arts with environmental science and conservation concerns that allow students to make real world global connections. Leonardo DiVinici is best know for painting the Mona Lisa, but did you know that he also kept nearly 13,000 pages of notes that fuse together art, nature and the physical universe? This professional development session will be centered around how you can incroporate conservation education practices as well as different art techniques into your science lessons that will engage all students.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will take away easy art techniques that can be incorporated in science lessons as well has how to add conservation education into their curriculum.

SPEAKERS:
Jackie Halsey (Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium: Omaha, NE)

Energizing Your Achievement - Shell Teacher Awards

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Instructional Methods and Teaching Philosophy tips
Shell Awards Requirements
Shell Combined flyer 2022-23.pdf
Shell Programs presentation

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Come start your winning application for the Shell Science Teaching Award, or the Shell Urban Science Educators Development Award. We'll walk through the application step by step and you'll be able to begin your application or nomination form live.

TAKEAWAYS:
Collaborate with past winners and judges to learn how to start your winning application for the Shell Teaching Awards. We'll walk through the application step by step and you'll be able to begin your application or nomination form live.

SPEAKERS:
Amanda Upton (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Melissa Collins (John P. Freeman Optional School: Memphis, TN)

A Cancer Case Study Storyline and Research Lesson

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
A Cancer Storyline Landing Page
Quick access to resources.
A Cancer Storyline Slide Deck

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Enjoy conversation about our research lesson collaboration with the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center EYES (Educators and Youth Enjoy Science) teacher research experience.

TAKEAWAYS:
Authentic teacher research experiences can catalyze students' career interest, authentic classroom inquiry, curriculum development, and relevant professional learning.

SPEAKERS:
Steven Rogg (Notre Dame College Prep: Niles, IL), Pamela Wagner (George Westinghouse College Prep: Chicago, IL)

Learning Better Science Practices with Science Fair Projects

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 5


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

A former national science fair judge provides insights on how good titles can improve the odds of winning at science fairs. The poster will describe what the parts of a "good" title are and how teachers can help your students create one.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn the components of a good project title (from an research project on science fairs) and how to help their students develop a good title for their own project.

SPEAKERS:
G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Global Conversations: International Film Festival and Share-a-thon

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 21


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

In this self-directed session, you will be able to: Interact with educators in face-to-face poster presentations; Watch short video submissions from educators around the world; and Participate in hands-on/minds-on, takeaway learning experiences.

TAKEAWAYS:
Science education occurs everywhere on this planet. We can get ideas and best practices from collegues around the world.

SPEAKERS:
Alison Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

Three Easy Steps to Adding Inquiry to Labs

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 14


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Creating inquiry activities doesn't have to require re-inventing the wheel. There are simple adjustments you can make to build inquiry into any activity.

TAKEAWAYS:
Three easy ways to build inquiry into traditional "cookbook" activites.

SPEAKERS:
Regina Borriello (Clifton High School: Edison, NJ)

Game Theory & Escape Rooms

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 31


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Escape-room activities offer promise for fun and function in developing social problem-solving skills. Participants will learn implementation and design strategies for their own ER environments.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how escape rooms help to engage students in dynamic learning environments and how to begin developing up your own activities.

SPEAKERS:
Joy Barnes-Johnson (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Mridula Bajaj (Mount Laurel Schools: Mount Laurel, NJ), Shefali Mehta (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ)

The Egg Drop Meets 2020

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W176c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Participants will design and test a vessel that will land an egg dropped from a substantial heights without breaking the egg. Participants will use a variety of materials to provide the softest landing possible. Participants will employ technology to assist them in designing their vessels and shape their final methods.

TAKEAWAYS:
Design and test an egg vessel with real time data. Analyze live data to better design a successful egg drop vessel. Experience the engineering design process. - Using technology to test prototypes. -employing the engineering design process. -applying modern technology to past challenges.

SPEAKERS:
Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY), Todd Graba (Crystal Lake South High School: Crystal Lake, IL)

3-D Learning for a Sustainable World

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W196a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Three-dimensional learning, as outlined by NGSS, allows students to view science as an interrelated world of inquiry. Today’s environmental challenges require a 3-D approach to understand the phenomena and data and how our landscapes and ecosystems have changed as human population has doubled in the past 50 years. In this hands-on session, the presenter will lead participants in hands-on activities (problem-solving challenges, simulations and modeling) that use real-world data sets and 3-D learning in a variety of formats to analyze and think critically about some of the key ecological topics in Biology and Environmental Science courses (including AP) – population trends, climate change, land use, biodiversity, and ecosystem health. Presented activities emphasize students’ ability to collect, analyze and interpret data as central to developing and using models, identifying patterns and designing solutions. The presenter will also share interactive digital tools for engaging students remotely. The presenter will discuss how to implement these activities as part of broadening students’ understanding of the NGSS topics “Human Sustainability” and “Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems. Participants will receive lesson plans (including assessment ideas) and background materials in an electronic format.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will come away with cross-disciplinary ideas to incorporate 3-D learning strategies into hands-on activities around the NGSS topic of Human Sustainability.

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Ruder (J.I. Case High School: Racine, WI)

Easily Understand Recursion through Natural Phenomena

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W187c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation Deck

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Recursion is a challenging topic for some students. In this session, we’ll present a blended approach to introducing recursion, wherein a textual description of natural phenomena is presented in an easy-to-understand, attractive, and informative graphic format. Fundamental rules of production systems are also presented, all in a format specifically targeted to high school students. Students generally gain mastery of this topic within a few weeks through this approach, achieving both a deep understanding of the concepts and a rewarding sense of accomplishment. As a bonus, they usually enjoy the topic and appreciate the opportunity this approach gives them to be creative.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to enable students to be creative while learning about recursion

SPEAKERS:
David Ben-Yaakov (Educator: Allen, TX)

Modeling Investigation of How Quarks Obtain Mass Through the Interaction of the Higgs Boson

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Each attendee will receive materials and instructions to construct a Higgs Boson. Dice and investigative procedure are included to determine the mass of six quarks.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. How to take an abstract concept and create concrete hands-on investigations; 2. Suggestions to go from teacher-centered to a student centered-curriculum; and 3. The importance of looking for trends, patterns, and regularities for modeling.

SPEAKERS:
Gary Schiltz (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Naperville, IL)

Engaging with Your STEM Ecosystem Through After-School Programs: Lessons from Science Olympiad

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W179b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

A challenge that STEM education presents to educators is how to stay current in an ever-evolving field to accurately represent and engage their students with new topics, activities, and careers. Too often STEM teachers become locked-in on a set of topics, activities, and careers because of the resources and opportunities to which they have access. After-school programs, and their ability to foster partnerships within a school’s larger STEM ecosystem, are one mechanism to open up STEM programs within schools to new topics, activities, and careers while offering avenues for professional growth and learning for the classroom teacher. By introducing the Science Olympiad program and the strategies used by our school participants for over three decades to build partnerships, connect to their STEM ecosystem, and expand learning we intend to help attendees draw parallels to their STEM ecosystems and their after-school programs. Building off of this information, attendees will analyze and discuss ways their STEM ecosystem can contribute to their STEM program, develop approaches for asking ecosystem members for support, and recognize opportunities to grow their STEM program through after-school programs. The session will close with a discussion of attendees’ specific challenges and issues ensuring attendees leave with actionable solutions.

TAKEAWAYS:
The big takeaway from this session will attendees examining their STEM ecosystem to identify potential partners who align with their programming and can support student learning.

SPEAKERS:
John Loehr (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL)

The Quantitative and Qualitative Modeling of the Doppler Effect

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W195


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The first 50 attendees will be be given the materials (circluar rings, rulers, and paper) to model the Doppler effect. Attendees will need a calculator for the quantitative portion of the workshop.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. How to take an abstract concept and create a concrete hands-on investigation; 2. Suggestions to go from teacher-centered to a student centered-curriculum; and 3. The importance of looking for trends, patterns, and regularities for modeling.

SPEAKERS:
Gary Schiltz (Retired Chemistry Teacher: Naperville, IL)

Your Students Can Be the First to Annotate (Discover the Function of) a Gene in a Microorganism

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W195



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Final NSTA Gene Annotation for Conference.pptx

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This hands-on project guides students through discovering the function of a microorganism gene (whose function has not yet been determined), assigned uniquely to that student.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Science is very exciting. Each student in the Geni-Act project will be the first person to discover the function of a gene in a microorganism. Results are entered into a national genome database; 2. The gene annotation process will be provided. Special tools or special knowledge are not required. There is no cost; and 3. Guidance for doing the annotation process with an inclusion class (a general education class with several special education students) will be provided.

Alexa for Astronauts: Bring Space and Voice Artificial Intelligence to Life Science This Year!

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://my.nsta.org/collection/sCD3GL620v4_E

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session will introduce participants to the Alexa for Astronauts: Using AI to Monitor Health lesson set. We will explore how the instructional sequence exposes high school students to ideas about artificial intelligence (AI) and computer programming, using Amazon Alexa and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) App Inventor, while applying previously built life science ideas to begin to address the problem of monitoring astronauts’ physical health. Participants will gain experience using the Alexa-MIT App Inventor to program custom Alexa skills and learn how to sign up for access to the instructional materials. No accounts needed; bring a laptop or device to access the Alexa-MIT App Inventor.

TAKEAWAYS:
The Alexa-MIT App Inventor platform and teacher supports found in the lesson plans make it possible to incorporate computer science and artificial intelligence ideas in Biology class.

SPEAKERS:
Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Garrett Dorfman (Amazon Future Engineer: Nashville, TN), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Designing Escape Boxes

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W183b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

SPEAKERS:
Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

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