2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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Pathway/Course

FILTERS APPLIED:Hands-On Workshop, No Strand, Sensemaking

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
9 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

What Is Sensemaking? Exploration and Consensus-Building Tasks for Individuals and Teams

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Join us to learn what sensemaking is and how to use research-based resources to engage students in making sense of the world around them. Leave with a collection of resources to move your professional learning forward no matter where you are on the sensemaking continuum.

TAKEAWAYS:
Develop an understanding of what sensemaking is and how it can help build classrooms where students are able to make sense of the world around them. Leaders walk away with a consensus-building exercise for their team.

SPEAKERS:
Tricia Shelton (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Elizabeth Allan (University of Central Oklahoma: Edmond, OK)

How Argument-Driven Inquiry Can Make Learning Experiences More Meaningful, Rigorous, and Equitable

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session introduces a way to create learning experiences that are meaningful, rigorous, and equitable for students. Participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS.

TAKEAWAYS:
The characteristics of learning experiences that are meaningful, relevant, and equitable for students and how to give students an opportunity to use their own ideas along with the DCIs, CCs, and SEPs in the service of sensemaking during these experiences.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

Beyond the Chocolates! Using grants to fund your classroom projects.

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Beyond the Chocolates
Grant writing for educators.
Beyond the Chocolates- Grant Writing for Educators
Beyond the Chocolates- Grant Writing for Educators

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The objective of this workshop is to guide educators through a mock grant-writing process. We will begin the session by discussing the grant process from proposal requests to awards. We will discuss misconceptions such as tax-exempt status requirements, time constraints, deliverables, project impact, collaboration, and more. Participants will have the opportunity to go through the process by searching for grants and completing a mock proposal. They will be provided with “step by step” guides to help them design a project, clarify their project objectives, create a budget, and determine the impact for their students, schools, and community. Participants will present their proposals and provide peer-to-peer feedback during the discussion part of the session.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to write a grant proposal for a classroom project.

SPEAKERS:
Emilia Odife (Lake Mary Preparatory School: Lake Mary, FL)

NASA Elementary GLOBE: Water Exploration Experience

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This is an inquiry-based hands-on NASA STEM lesson based on a free storybook The Mystery at Willow Creek. All participants can learn from this experience regardless of level. The STEM activities incorporate cooperative learning and exploration. The session activity is versatile and can be used as a standalone or incorporated into complex units. The participants will receive 4 mystery samples. They will use their senses and pH paper to identify the samples with “pollution” and the one that is water. The PowerPoint will include the videos and activities including the tips and pointers and will be made available to all participants. The teacher’s guide is available online at no cost on http://www.globe.gov/web/elementary-globe. The teacher’s guide includes the free storybooks, activities, material lists, Instructional strategies, assessments, and cross-curricular implementation. Session Overview: 10 min- STEM Engagement strategies: Getting Organized 5 min- The Importance of Fresh Water 10 min- Introduce “Discoveries at Willow Creek” storybook 20 min- Activity: “Water Detectives Activity” –Using our senses 10 min – Reporting out -Why we are collecting water data? 5 min- Q and A

TAKEAWAYS:
NASA Elementary GLOBE has free storybooks with three or more STEM Activities each integrating the Core Standards with the Science standards. The materials are translated into 5 languages. Exploring the environment with a field experience ( Water Walk) will engage students in real-world culturally relevant problem-solving.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Kohler (NASA Glenn Research Center: Cleveland, OH)

How to Give Children Opportunities to Use Science and Literacy to Make Sense of the World Around Them

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session introduces a way to create learning experiences that will give students opportunities to talk, read, and write in the service of sensemaking as they use the DCIs, CCs, and SEPs to explain natural phenomena.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to ensure students have access to science in grades 3–5 by designing investigations that promote and support the use of literacy skills in the service of sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

NASA Space Technology: Robotics and the International Space Station

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Learning Launchers: Robotics (https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/stem-on-station/learning_launchers_robotics) teacher toolkit part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help bring the International Space Station into the classroom. This session will focus on the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity that engages participants to build and test a robotic-like hand and understand how NASA uses robotic explorers to collect information about places where humans cannot travel. After watching videos "Robotics and the International Space Station" & "Benefits For Humanity: From Space to Surgery" participants will work in teams to construct a robotic-like hand and test their robotic hand by picking up an empty soda can or other lightweight objects. The “I Want to Hold Your Hand Activity” is aligned to national standards for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) (i.e., NGSS, ISTE). The focus of the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity ties Engineering Design and NGSS science and engineering practices of defining problems, developing models, and planning and carrying out investigations. This session connects participants to how NASA uses robots in many ways as well as benefit humanity with its robots’ doing science and experiments aboard the International Space Station.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Attendees will gain hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM engagement activity in their classroom using everyday materials that encourages students to construct a robotic-like hand and demonstrate how data are collected when using robotic technology. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how humans and robots are working hand in hand to expand the horizons of space exploration and how robotic research that has helped make advances in medicine, auto manufacturing, among other things. Without robotics, major accomplishments like the building the International Space Station, repairing satellites in space, and exploring other worlds would not be possible.

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

NASA STEM: Computational Thinking: Crew Transportation with Orion

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The free NASA STEM lesson plans introduce the practice of computational thinking and include elements of a real NASA mission. NASA’s Artemis program will return humans to the lunar surface for the first time since 1972, the year of the agency's last Apollo moon landing. This Educator Guide provides four standards-aligned activities to help students learn about NASA's Orion spacecraft that will take astronauts to the Moon and beyond. In this session, we will design and build a crew module model that will secure two 2-cm astronaut figures during a drop test. The PowerPoint will be available to all participants. The PowerPoint will include the videos and activities including the tips and pointers. Session Outline: 5 min - Welcome and Introduction to NASA Artemis Mission 10 min- STEM Engagement strategies and culturally relevant teaching 10 min- Introducing the Engineering Design Challenge 20 min- Teams Design a Crew Vehicle 10 min- Testing the Crew Vehicle 5 min- Reviewing the Resources and Q and A https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/np-2020-02-2805-hq.pdf

TAKEAWAYS:
NASA provides free educational resources that include educator guides with standards-aligned activities to help students use computational thinking while including elements of real NASA missions.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Kohler (NASA Glenn Research Center: Cleveland, OH)

From Typhoid Mary to COVID-19: Pursuing an Understanding of Disease Transmission and Tracking Through Integrative STEM

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
From Typhoid Mary to COVID-19.pptx.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The exploration of the intersection of science and technology at the turn of the 20th century through present times is examined in this session by beginning with the case study of Typhoid Mary and ending with how Integrative STEM has impacted all areas of COVID-19 Participants use the radio function of the MICROBITs, a computer program called infection models to examine how contagious diseases are spread across a population. After considering how Typhoid was tracked at the time Mary Mallon was an asymptomatic cook, participants first try the simulation without any "vaccinated" participants. Then, participants come up with a method(s) for preventing the radio signal from teaching their MICROBIT and participate in the scenario a second time. Data is collected each round and participants solve which one was patient zero.

TAKEAWAYS:
Engage in a simulation that integrates technology (micro:bits), historical studies, and sense making activities around a current event topic.

SPEAKERS:
Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS), Christine Anne Royce (Shippensburg University: Shippensburg, PA), Beverly DeVore-Wedding (Nebraska Indian Community College: Meeker, CO)

NASA's Newest X-plane: "X-57 -- It's Electrifying!"

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W193a


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Did you know that every U.S. aircraft flying today, and every U.S. air traffic control facility, uses NASA-developed technology in some way? Participants in this session will gain insights into how NASA Aeronautics work to make aviation truly sustainable by reducing delays and environmental impacts, transforming aviation efficiency and safety, while reducing noise, fuel use, harmful emissions, and ultimately transform the way we fly. NASA’s X-57 Maxwell is an experimental aircraft designed to test operating multiple electric motors for use in turning propellers – an idea known as “distributed electric propulsion.” This session highlights an activity from NASA’s “X-57 Electric Airplane: STEM Learning Module” (https://www.nasa.gov/aeroresearch/stem/X57 ) part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help students learn about NASA’s X-57 Maxwell and the science behind electric propulsion. This session will focus on the “X-57 Maxwell: Circuits Activity Guide” that engages participants to build a light-up paper helicopter by creating a “parallel circuit” that uses copper foil tape, two LED lights, and a battery. This session’s goals are to demonstrate that an all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly. Session participants will understand that knowledge gained from the X-57 Maxwell research will help engineers design future electric-powered aircraft for everything from urban air mobility to moving passengers and cargo between nearby cities.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM activity in their classroom that encourages students to create a parallel circuit on a paper helicopter as an introduction to circuitry and propulsion. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how NASA’s X-57 Maxwell all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly while gaining a better understanding of the STEM concepts of energy transfer, and the physical science of pressure and aerodynamics.

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

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