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2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 27 results

Wednesday, July 20
11:45 AM - 12:45 PM
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Lunch: Elements of Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

Hyatt Regency McCormick Place - Regency Ballroom

By Invitation Only

Shifting from traditional professional development to curriculum-based professional learning is a simple concept but complex to design and execute well. At its core, it means teachers experience the same kind of inquiry-based learning we expect them to provide their students. Learn more about a Carnegie Corporation of New York report, The Elements, which identifies a core set of research-based actions, approaches, and enabling conditions that effective schools and systems have put in place to reinforce and amplify the power of high-quality curriculum and skillful teaching.

Takeaways: 1. Examine beliefs and assumptions regarding the relationship between high-quality instructional materials, curriculum-based professional learning and student success 2. Gain understanding of the foundation for The Elements, a challenge paper from Carnegie Corporation of New York 3. Learn from science practitioners whose successful curriculum implementation efforts are grounded in the elements and essentials.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Unpacking the Crosscutting Concepts with a Brand New NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimensions

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

Since its release, the NSTA Quick-Reference Guide to the NGSS has become an essential tool for many educators across the country. A new version titled the Quick-Reference Guide to the Three Dimension has been developed to not only support teachers in all states that have standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education. This new version of the Quick-Reference Guide still contains the most useful features of the original, including descriptions of the practices and the crosscutting concepts from the Framework of K-12 Science Education and K-12 progressions of the elements of all three dimensions. In addition, the new Quick-Reference Guide contains several new features that should make it even more helpful. For example, every element now has a unique code (based on the codes in the NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions) that makes it much easier to reference a particular element. In addition, there is an entire chapter devoted to the Performance Expectations. Finally, the guide also contains a number of tools for working with standards. This session will outline all of the features of the guide through the process of unpacking the crosscutting concepts to better understand how to make curriculum, instruction, and assessment more three-dimensional.

Takeaways: A deeper understanding of the Crosscutting Concepts and how a well-designed reference guide can make it easier to unpack the three dimensions for work in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

Speakers

Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Thursday, July 21
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

One of the key features of the NGSS and other standards based on the Framework for K-12 Science Education is the idea that a “a progression of knowledge occurs from grade band to grade band that gives students the opportunity to learn more complex material, leading to an overall understanding of science by the end of high school.” (NGSS Appendix A, p. 2) The NSTA Atlas of the Three Dimensions has a set of 62 maps that illustrate the how the elements of the three dimensions build on each other and connect to one another. Each map focuses on a particular topic and shows the progression students are expected to make in that topic from one grade-span to the next. Arrows connecting individual elements on a map indicate that competency in one element is useful in learning to achieve the other element. Educators can use maps to deepen their understanding of the standards to plan or improve curriculum, instruction, and assessment. This session will provide participants guidance on how to read the maps in the Atlas and use this powerful tool to deepen their understanding of elements of the standards.

Takeaways: A careful review of the connections between elements of the three dimensions can provide a clearer understanding of science standards and important guidance in planning instructional sequences to support three-dimensional teaching and learning.

Speakers

Ted Willard (Discovery Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Dumpster Dive with STEM

McCormick Place - W175c

Connect the human impact of trash pollution to engineering design. Get your students thinking critically and creatively as they collaborate in real-world problem-solving. The global real-world issue of human-generated trash polluting local bodies of water is the main focus of this hands-on session. Using our partnership with the Howard County Conservancy, our students learn about their local watersheds and contribute to a Watershed Report Card. Students see how trash that is often found on our local schoolyards can affect our watershed, and they design a working model for trash removal in a local tributary. Basic coding will be used to design programs that will control sensors and motors through a microcontroller, thus removing the trash from the water source. The model will utilize solar and water power to move the trash into a separate receptacle. Various sensors will also be used to monitor water levels and determine the outcome of the program. This session will allow participants to find ways to increase the environmental stewardship of their students while incorporating engineering design into the science classroom. This project allows authentic integration of technology, mathematics, crosscutting concepts, science practices, and easy implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

Takeaways: Design a project that enhances STEM skills in students such as collaboration, curiosity and creative problem solving.

Speakers

Jessica Kohout (Howard County Conservancy: Woodstock, MD), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Dumpster Dive With STEM Participant Folder

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Executive Function Supports for Creating Inclusive Science Classrooms

McCormick Place - W179a

Come learn about simple, applicable strategies to support your students' executive function skills in the science classroom, with an emphasis on project planning, organization, flexible thinking, and time management.

Takeaways: Attendees will identify the educational impact of the 11 main executive functions, as well as learn concrete strategies for supporting their students in both general and special education settings.

Speakers

Krista Northcutt (New Way Academy: Phoenix, AZ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Presentation 7_21 (1).pdf
EF Supports for Inclusive Science Classrooms Presentation PDF
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1TUPMxotRYq0ZsboPp7i1jxMVKthb0vnv?usp=sharing

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 5:40 PM
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Meet Me in the Middle, Lite: A Share-a-Thon

McCormick Place - W183b

Engage in a variety of activities, collect information and resources, and network with middle level leaders. Discover new ideas and materials that you can use next week.

Takeaways: The participants will network with other middle level science educators and leaders to discover and engage in activities that will expand their knowledge and be usable in all aspects of their work.

Speakers

Mary Lou Lipscomb (National Middle Level Science Teachers Association: Naperville, IL), Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Carey Dieleman (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ), Cynthia Crockett (Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian: Cambridge, MA), Suzanne Cunningham (Purdue University: West Lafayette, IN), Katy Garvey (The Source for Learning, Inc.: Reston, VA), Nicole Green (Animalearn: Jenkintown, PA), Joseph Michaelis (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Kim Nagle (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Cori Nelson (Winfield School District 34: Winfield, IL), Anne Farley Schoeffler (Seton Catholic School: Hudson, OH), Dennis Schatz (Institute for Learning Innovation: Beaverton, OR), Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0), Corydon Strawser (Lake Nona Middle School: Orlando, FL), Stacy Thibodeaux (Southside High School: Youngsville, LA), Barbara Phillips-Bredlow (Northeast Nodaway School District: Ravenwood, MO), Dawn Konieczny (Brooks Middle School: Bolingbrook, IL), Erin Towns (Edward Little High School: Auburn, ME)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

UIC Teacher Fellows Info
Informational Flyer on Teacher Fellows program to develop classroom learning companion robots

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Incorporating the 3 Rs of Animal Use in High School Science Classes

McCormick Place - W175a

A cross-disciplinary team of teachers, subject matter experts, and curriculum developers have designed resources and materials to facilitate teaching students about the use of animals in scientific research in the United States, as well as Russell and Burch’s 3 Rs principles of replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal use. The materials, which are aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, are geared toward high school science students. The modules can be taught separately or in combination, giving educators flexibility to choose specific content areas to share and explore with their students. During the session, we will present two learning plans: one that introduces students to the 3 Rs principles and how animals are used in scientific research, and another that covers the 3 Rs principles in more depth. We will share information, including teaching plans, learning materials, and performance assessment tasks associated with the curriculum, with session attendees.

Takeaways: Attendees will have an opportunity to learn more about the content and activities covered in two lesson plans focused on the use of animals in scientific research in the United States and the 3 Rs principles. Sample lesson plans and associated learning materials, including presentations, articles, and worksheets, will be shared with attendees.

Speakers

Pam Osenkowski (National Anti-Vivisection Society: Chicago, IL)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Planning More Accessible Science Lessons with Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

McCormick Place - W184d

In this presentation we will start with an existing basic physical science lesson that uses disciplinary core ideas on electricity, the engineering practice of making a model by constructing a basic electrical circuit, and the cross-cutting concept of cause and effect (closing the circuit starts current flow and turns on the light). We will then modify it using Universal Design for Learning (UDL) so it is more accessible, especially for students with disabilities. UDL encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson and gives students several ways to acquire the lesson knowledge, Multiple means of expression allows the students several choices in how they can “show what they know” and multiple means of engagement offers learners offers appropriate challenges to get students interested and motivated. Planning or modifying lessons using UDL not only makes lessons more accessible, but it also makes lessons more engaging for all students in inclusive classrooms.

Takeaways: 1) Universal Design for Learning (UDL) encourages multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement for presenting and receiving content and information related to the lesson. Use of UDL makes lessons more engaging for all students. 2) Applying UDL (Universal Design for Learning) will make the lesson more accessible, especially for students with special needs. 3) You may start with a lesson you already have. It is not necessary to develop a lesson from scratch when using UDL.

Speakers

Mary Ellen O'Donnell (The Help Group: Los Angeles, CA), Gargi Adhikari (Holland Brook School: Whitehouse Station, NJ)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pdf
Final Planning Science Lessons For ALL- NSTA Chicago.pptx
Speaking like a scientist.pdf - Inv. Part 1.pdf
Claims and evidence.jpg
Debate.jpg

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Promoting Equity for Girls Through Purposeful STEM Clubs

McCormick Place - W187b

Learn how to assist educators in facilitating purposeful STEM clubs for elementary girls, focusing on strategies promoting female student achievement, confidence, and interest in science.

Takeaways: 1. Strategies to establish and facilitate STEM clubs that are fun, develop collaboration, actively combat stereotypes, and provide students with female role models in the STEM community; 2. An exploration of options for club formats and in-class applications, possible equity protocols, as well as a discussion of potential barriers and possible solutions for educators; and 3. Tools and resources for further research and strategies.

Speakers

David Rosengrant (University of South Florida St. Petersburg: St. Petersburg, FL), Nicole Caltabellotta (Mt. Vernon Elementary: St. Petersburg, FL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Chicago Presentation.pptx

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Robots in Science! Integrating robotics and computational thinking into middle school science classrooms

McCormick Place - W181b

Robotics activities can be an engaging and innovative way to help students learn core science concepts, while also introducing engineering design and computer programming. In this session, participants will learn about three robotics activities that help students engage with physical science concepts. Educators will hear about: (1) an activity involving speed and acceleration. Through a combination of activities students explored and calculated speed. After walking and running at intervals, students built vehicles to show speed and acceleration, ultimately graphing data to compare constant speed and acceleration; (2) ways in which students applied knowledge and skills learned during a PLTW Design and Modeling class as they designed and built a prototype toy for use in therapy with children with Cerebral Palsy or other disabilities; (3) how students used robots to explain a concept from a light and sound unit to peers and students from younger grades. Students selected one of the concepts from a light and sound unit, made a display, built a robot, and prepared a presentation to explain their concept and how it works in the world outside our classroom.

Takeaways: Participants will learn how using robotics activities in science and engineering classes can support and enhance students’ learning of physical science concepts, while also engaging students in problem solving and engineering design processes.

Speakers

Richard Shroyer (Logos Lab School: Richmond, IN), Tiauna Washington (Hibberd Intermediate School: Richmond, IN), Debra Bernstein (TERC: Cambridge, MA), McCall Emerick (Acmetonia Elementary School: Cheswick, PA)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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The Scoop on STEM Competitions Administered by NSTA

McCormick Place - W176a

Join us for a chance to learn more about  NSTA-administered competitions and awards from NSTA staff and past participants. NSTA-administered competitions include NSTA Teacher Awards, the Army Educational Outreach Program, Shell Science Lab Regional Challenge, and Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision competitions. This engaging hour will include discussion and tips on how to engage K–12 students in project-based learning opportunities that are no cost to participate.

Takeaways: 1. Engage with educators that have participated in NSTA-administered competitions and awards; 2. Learn more about opportunities to engage students in project-based learning; and 3. Share best practices and tips to foster inquiry-based learning and showcase ideas.

Speakers

Acacia McKenna (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA Competitions_ presentation.pdf

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Learning Better Science Practices with Science Fair Projects

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 5

A former national science fair judge provides insights on how good titles can improve the odds of winning at science fairs. The poster will describe what the parts of a "good" title are and how teachers can help your students create one.

Takeaways: Teachers will learn the components of a good project title (from an research project on science fairs) and how to help their students develop a good title for their own project.

Speakers

G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Global Conversations: International Film Festival and Share-a-thon

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 21

In this self-directed session, you will be able to: Interact with educators in face-to-face poster presentations; Watch short video submissions from educators around the world; and Participate in hands-on/minds-on, takeaway learning experiences.

Takeaways: Science education occurs everywhere on this planet. We can get ideas and best practices from collegues around the world.

Speakers

Alison Betz Seymour (Science Teacher: Winchester, 0)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Game Theory & Escape Rooms

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 31

Escape-room activities offer promise for fun and function in developing social problem-solving skills. Participants will learn implementation and design strategies for their own ER environments.

Takeaways: Learn how escape rooms help to engage students in dynamic learning environments and how to begin developing up your own activities.

Speakers

Joy Barnes-Johnson (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ), Mridula Bajaj (Mount Laurel Schools: Mount Laurel, NJ), Shefali Mehta (Princeton High School: Princeton, NJ)

Friday, July 22
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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The Egg Drop Meets 2020

McCormick Place - W176c

Participants will design and test a vessel that will land an egg dropped from a substantial heights without breaking the egg. Participants will use a variety of materials to provide the softest landing possible. Participants will employ technology to assist them in designing their vessels and shape their final methods.

Takeaways: Design and test an egg vessel with real time data. Analyze live data to better design a successful egg drop vessel. Experience the engineering design process. - Using technology to test prototypes. -employing the engineering design process. -applying modern technology to past challenges.

Speakers

Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY), Todd Graba (Crystal Lake South High School: Crystal Lake, IL)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Engaging with Your STEM Ecosystem Through After-School Programs: Lessons from Science Olympiad

McCormick Place - W179b

A challenge that STEM education presents to educators is how to stay current in an ever-evolving field to accurately represent and engage their students with new topics, activities, and careers. Too often STEM teachers become locked-in on a set of topics, activities, and careers because of the resources and opportunities to which they have access. After-school programs, and their ability to foster partnerships within a school’s larger STEM ecosystem, are one mechanism to open up STEM programs within schools to new topics, activities, and careers while offering avenues for professional growth and learning for the classroom teacher. By introducing the Science Olympiad program and the strategies used by our school participants for over three decades to build partnerships, connect to their STEM ecosystem, and expand learning we intend to help attendees draw parallels to their STEM ecosystems and their after-school programs. Building off of this information, attendees will analyze and discuss ways their STEM ecosystem can contribute to their STEM program, develop approaches for asking ecosystem members for support, and recognize opportunities to grow their STEM program through after-school programs. The session will close with a discussion of attendees’ specific challenges and issues ensuring attendees leave with actionable solutions.

Takeaways: The big takeaway from this session will attendees examining their STEM ecosystem to identify potential partners who align with their programming and can support student learning.

Speakers

John Loehr (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL)

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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What is Happening to the Rusty Patched Bumblebee?

McCormick Place - W195

Did you know that the Rusty Patched Bumblebee has lost 80% of its range in the last 20 years? Today, it is the first native pollinator to be put on the endangered species list. Why is this happening? And why should you care? Come explore a unit that guides students in using science and engineering practices to make sense of the functioning of the Rusty Patched Bumblebee’s ecosystem. From data on climate change to theories of pathogen spread, students grapple with all that science knows to date and create their own model for how changes to that system are impacting this keystone species. Learning is then extended beyond the walls of the classroom when students engage in intergenerational conversations and design actionable solutions to help this endangered native pollinator. Links to teacher guides and free printable and editable files will be shared with participants. This lesson will be shared through the perspective of a 7th grade life science teacher Amanda Mellenthin and her students, but is appropriate for grades 6-12. This unit is created by NFP: OnlyOneSky and information about the unit is found on skydayproject.com.

Takeaways: Participants will walk through a high quality NGSS lesson that they can adapt to their classroom and supportive teacher resources.

Speakers

Amanda Mellenthin (Carriel Junior High School: O Fallon, IL)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Creating a Science Classroom Podcast

McCormick Place - W187c

Marshall Escamilla, one of the co-hosts of the freely-available Tumble Science Podcast for Kids, will share some of the basics of creating a podcast with your class. Classroom podcasts are a great way for students to share their learning with the broader community, and can be used both as assessment and communication tools--and it's a lot easier to do than you'd think. Beginning with a brief description of what features make Tumble free and accessible, Marshall will walk educators through all the thing they'll need to consider when creating a podcast. We'll start by asking questions like: -Who is the intended audience for this podcast? -What is the overall topic for it? -How many episodes do we want to create, and how often do we want to release them? Then we'll move on to some of the technical elements. What are the requirements for creating a podcast studio in your classroom? What equipment do you need to buy? What software do students need to have access to? how do you ensure that students can have access to what they need in order to be successful? Finally, we will discuss some of the basic skills teachers will need to ensure student success: knowledge of best audio recording practices, and how to use a few easily-accessible software tools to make students' work sound its best.

Takeaways: Attendees at this ession will learn the very basics of how to create a classroom podcast from a professional podcaster.

Speakers

Marshall Escamilla (Tumble Media Production: Greenfield, MA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Podcasting NSTA Session Resources

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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NASA Space Technology: Robotics and the International Space Station

McCormick Place - W185d

This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Learning Launchers: Robotics (https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/stem-on-station/learning_launchers_robotics) teacher toolkit part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help bring the International Space Station into the classroom. This session will focus on the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity that engages participants to build and test a robotic-like hand and understand how NASA uses robotic explorers to collect information about places where humans cannot travel. After watching videos "Robotics and the International Space Station" & "Benefits For Humanity: From Space to Surgery" participants will work in teams to construct a robotic-like hand and test their robotic hand by picking up an empty soda can or other lightweight objects. The “I Want to Hold Your Hand Activity” is aligned to national standards for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) (i.e., NGSS, ISTE). The focus of the “I Want to Hold Your Hand” activity ties Engineering Design and NGSS science and engineering practices of defining problems, developing models, and planning and carrying out investigations. This session connects participants to how NASA uses robots in many ways as well as benefit humanity with its robots’ doing science and experiments aboard the International Space Station.

Takeaways: 1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Attendees will gain hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM engagement activity in their classroom using everyday materials that encourages students to construct a robotic-like hand and demonstrate how data are collected when using robotic technology. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how humans and robots are working hand in hand to expand the horizons of space exploration and how robotic research that has helped make advances in medicine, auto manufacturing, among other things. Without robotics, major accomplishments like the building the International Space Station, repairing satellites in space, and exploring other worlds would not be possible.

Speakers

LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

Saturday, July 23
9:20 AM - 10:20 AM
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Your Students Can Be the First to Annotate (Discover the Function of) a Gene in a Microorganism

McCormick Place - W195

This hands-on project guides students through discovering the function of a microorganism gene (whose function has not yet been determined), assigned uniquely to that student.

Takeaways: 1. Science is very exciting. Each student in the Geni-Act project will be the first person to discover the function of a gene in a microorganism. Results are entered into a national genome database; 2. The gene annotation process will be provided. Special tools or special knowledge are not required. There is no cost; and 3. Guidance for doing the annotation process with an inclusion class (a general education class with several special education students) will be provided.

Speakers

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Final NSTA Gene Annotation for Conference.pptx

Saturday, July 23
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Using Audio to Enhance Science Learning

McCormick Place - W187c

In this panel discussion, we will discuss the ways that audio content like podcasts can be used in the classroom to increase student engagement. This discussion between several leaders in the field of audio education will share some of the ways that teachers can and should use audio content to enhance science learning at all grade levels.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to include audio in their lesson plans in ways that are effective, engaging, and inclusive.

Speakers

Marshall Escamilla (Tumble Media Production: Greenfield, MA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Podcasting NSTA Session Resources

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Artemis: NASA's Missions to the Moon & Mars

McCormick Place - W186c

Attendees will be provided with a high-level overview of NASA’s Artemis Missions to the Moon and Mars, Next Generation Science Standards, and gain insights on how Engineering Design fits within the NGSS. This session highlights an activity from NASA’s Next Gen STEM - Moon to Mars Educator Guide titled, "Landing Humans on the Moon" (https://www.nasa.gov/stem-ed-resources/landing-humans-on-the-moon.html) which is part of a series of standards-aligned educator guides designed to help students reach their potential to join the next-generation STEM workforce and learn about sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. The focus of the “Safe Landing on the Lunar Surface” activity engages participants to understand how a spacecraft’s engines can provide downward thrust to counteract the force of gravity not only at launch, but also during a landing to slow its descent. Utilizing the engineering design process attendees will use household materials to better understand the difficulties in landing a lander on the surface of a terrestrial body that does not have an atmosphere (no atmospheric braking, no use of parachutes, and no aerodynamic control surfaces). Participants will design, build, and improve a model of a lunar lander that can slow its descent using the downward thrust of a balloon; graph the speed with respect to elevation of a model lunar lander.

Takeaways: 1. Attendee will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom to help students learn about sending humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. 2. Attendees will gain hand on minds on experience with implementing NASA STEM engagement activities in their classroom. Then, using engineering design principles, attendees will mirror the process that NASA engineers follow to brainstorm a human lander design, ultimately building an actual model that they will test. 3. Participants will gain insights into the difficulties in landing a lander on the surface of a terrestrial body that does not have an atmosphere (no atmospheric braking, no use of parachutes, and no aerodynamic control surfaces).

Speakers

LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Alexa for Astronauts: Bring Space and Voice Artificial Intelligence to Life Science This Year!

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

This session will introduce participants to the Alexa for Astronauts: Using AI to Monitor Health lesson set. We will explore how the instructional sequence exposes high school students to ideas about artificial intelligence (AI) and computer programming, using Amazon Alexa and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) App Inventor, while applying previously built life science ideas to begin to address the problem of monitoring astronauts’ physical health. Participants will gain experience using the Alexa-MIT App Inventor to program custom Alexa skills and learn how to sign up for access to the instructional materials. No accounts needed; bring a laptop or device to access the Alexa-MIT App Inventor.

Takeaways: The Alexa-MIT App Inventor platform and teacher supports found in the lesson plans make it possible to incorporate computer science and artificial intelligence ideas in Biology class.

Speakers

Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Garrett Dorfman (Amazon Future Engineer: Nashville, TN), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/sCD3GL620v4_E

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Get Real with School Gardens - Explore the Successes and Failures of the Carriel Garden in O'Fallon, IL

McCormick Place - W187c

The Carriel Garden is a space where students can explore and experiment in nature while learning about connections to society and citizenship. Starting from a school-wide lunch waste worm composting program, the Carriel Garden has flourished into problem-based learning experience for more than just science classes. This session focuses on the success and failures we have encountered along the way in creating a native pollinator patch, vegetable garden, and small school greenhouse at a junior high school in southern Illinois. The presenter, Mrs. Mellenthin, will share lessons she has experienced first hand with her 7th grade science students from learning the escape routines of monarch caterpillars, how to compost outside in Illinois winters, navigating the local farmers market to sell student grown plants, and techniques for running from gophers, deer, and other garden surprises. ;) Topics addressed in the session will include funding solutions, community connections, staff buy in, summer support, STEM connections, and many lessons learned. The session will end with an opportunity for participants to network with others, ask questions, and formulate solutions for their own school projects.

Takeaways: Attendees will gain practical examples of problem based learning in a school garden and gain ideas on how to set up or tackle issues in their own school garden spaces.

Speakers

Amanda Mellenthin (Carriel Junior High School: O Fallon, IL)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Designing Escape Boxes

McCormick Place - W183b

Turn any multiple-choice review into an exciting escape! Learn to create digital and in-person escapes to help keep students interested, engaged, and motivated.

Takeaways: Participants will learn tips for designing escape boxes, plus how to add riddles, puzzles, games, and small prizes. The digital escape uses Google Forms, and the physical escape uses lockable boxes with resettable combination locks. Links to a customizable digital and physical escape will be available to attendees.

Speakers

Sharon Beck (Davidson County High School: Lexington, NC)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Designing Escape Boxes--PPT Version
This PowerPoint describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.
Designing Escape Boxes--PDF Version
This PowerPoint (in PDF format) describes how to Design Escape Boxes and contains a link to all the workshop documents in Google Drive. To edit any of the Google Drive materials, click on File > Make a Copy.

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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From Typhoid Mary to COVID-19: Pursuing an Understanding of Disease Transmission and Tracking Through Integrative STEM

McCormick Place - W184d

The exploration of the intersection of science and technology at the turn of the 20th century through present times is examined in this session by beginning with the case study of Typhoid Mary and ending with how Integrative STEM has impacted all areas of COVID-19 Participants use the radio function of the MICROBITs, a computer program called infection models to examine how contagious diseases are spread across a population. After considering how Typhoid was tracked at the time Mary Mallon was an asymptomatic cook, participants first try the simulation without any "vaccinated" participants. Then, participants come up with a method(s) for preventing the radio signal from teaching their MICROBIT and participate in the scenario a second time. Data is collected each round and participants solve which one was patient zero.

Takeaways: Engage in a simulation that integrates technology (micro:bits), historical studies, and sense making activities around a current event topic.

Speakers

Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS), Christine Anne Royce (Shippensburg University: Shippensburg, PA), Bev DeVore-Wedding (Adams State University: Alamosa, CO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

From Typhoid Mary to COVID-19.pptx.pdf

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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NASA's Newest X-plane: "X-57 -- It's Electrifying!"

McCormick Place - W193a

Did you know that every U.S. aircraft flying today, and every U.S. air traffic control facility, uses NASA-developed technology in some way? Participants in this session will gain insights into how NASA Aeronautics work to make aviation truly sustainable by reducing delays and environmental impacts, transforming aviation efficiency and safety, while reducing noise, fuel use, harmful emissions, and ultimately transform the way we fly. NASA’s X-57 Maxwell is an experimental aircraft designed to test operating multiple electric motors for use in turning propellers – an idea known as “distributed electric propulsion.” This session highlights an activity from NASA’s “X-57 Electric Airplane: STEM Learning Module” (https://www.nasa.gov/aeroresearch/stem/X57 ) part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help students learn about NASA’s X-57 Maxwell and the science behind electric propulsion. This session will focus on the “X-57 Maxwell: Circuits Activity Guide” that engages participants to build a light-up paper helicopter by creating a “parallel circuit” that uses copper foil tape, two LED lights, and a battery. This session’s goals are to demonstrate that an all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly. Session participants will understand that knowledge gained from the X-57 Maxwell research will help engineers design future electric-powered aircraft for everything from urban air mobility to moving passengers and cargo between nearby cities.

Takeaways: 1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM activity in their classroom that encourages students to create a parallel circuit on a paper helicopter as an introduction to circuitry and propulsion. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how NASA’s X-57 Maxwell all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly while gaining a better understanding of the STEM concepts of energy transfer, and the physical science of pressure and aerodynamics.

Speakers

LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)