2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Presentation, Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom, Technical and Vocational Education

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
8 results
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Self-Paced STEM and Equity for All Learners

Friday, July 22 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W181c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Self-Paced STEM and Equity for All Learners Slideshow

STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

Self-paced classrooms are a means to run a STEM class where the teacher becomes a facilitator of learning to their students. A self-paced classroom is one where the students will engage with the class material at a rate that is appropriate for them. Assignments are rated into different categories worth different point values so that students can make a choice each day in how they want to approach their learning. This kind of environment encourages development of executive functioning skills, cooperative learning skills, and other soft skills necessary to be successful as a 21st century learner, scientist, or engineer. It also meets the needs of both the highest and the lowest functioning learners. In this session, we will learn in more detail about self-paced classrooms, how to implement them, and how to develop different types of activities and locate resources that work well for this kind of environment, including interactive digital notebooks, pixel art, EdPuzzles, digital crossword puzzles, lab experiments, digital and live escape rooms, and more! Join me as we learn how we can make equity for all enjoyable for all the students.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to use various computer programs, specifically in the Google Suite, to create an equitable classroom environment.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Stewart-Miranda (Greater Lowell Technical High School: Tyngsboro, MA)

STEM + Empathy in Use in the Design of an Improved Bionic Arm

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W185d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Slides
Session slides with links to all resources and contact information

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Empathic engineering design can help develop students’ cultural competence as well as inform the design of more useful innovations for people with limb differences.

TAKEAWAYS:
School-based activities that are oriented toward improving community members’ lives can simultaneously support the development of students’ cultural competence and integrated STEM literacy.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Meabh Kelly (University of Connecticut: Storrs Mansfield, CT), Brittany Klimowicz (NYC iSchool: New York, NY)

NSTA/ISTA Session- Bridging the Gap: Connecting STEM/Science Learning in CTE

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Bridging the GAP

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Student understanding of how science and STEM ideas and concepts are applied within their chosen career pathway is a critical component of many Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs, but for a variety of reasons these connections are often overlooked. Some states even provide CTE courses and Career Pathway standards that seem to go against the three-dimensional and student-centered learning grain. Yet, to truly meet the vision of the K-12 Framework, students in CTE and Vocational Education pathways should also be provided opportunities to engage in three-dimensional sensemaking in the context of their CTE course. In this session, we explore explicit connections between three-dimensional science learning and Agricultural, Food and Natural Resources as just one example of how three-dimensional student learning and sensemaking can be incorporated into CTE. We then explore how similar strategies can be utilized in other pathways with the goal of bridging the gap between science learning and practical application for students in CTE.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn strategies for integrating scientific sensemaking into CTE courses to support their students' mastery of the scientific concepts they will apply in those fields.

SPEAKERS:
Bridina Lemmer (Illinois Science Teaching Association: Jacksonville, IL), Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)

Engaging with Your STEM Ecosystem Through After-School Programs: Lessons from Science Olympiad

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W179b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

A challenge that STEM education presents to educators is how to stay current in an ever-evolving field to accurately represent and engage their students with new topics, activities, and careers. Too often STEM teachers become locked-in on a set of topics, activities, and careers because of the resources and opportunities to which they have access. After-school programs, and their ability to foster partnerships within a school’s larger STEM ecosystem, are one mechanism to open up STEM programs within schools to new topics, activities, and careers while offering avenues for professional growth and learning for the classroom teacher. By introducing the Science Olympiad program and the strategies used by our school participants for over three decades to build partnerships, connect to their STEM ecosystem, and expand learning we intend to help attendees draw parallels to their STEM ecosystems and their after-school programs. Building off of this information, attendees will analyze and discuss ways their STEM ecosystem can contribute to their STEM program, develop approaches for asking ecosystem members for support, and recognize opportunities to grow their STEM program through after-school programs. The session will close with a discussion of attendees’ specific challenges and issues ensuring attendees leave with actionable solutions.

TAKEAWAYS:
The big takeaway from this session will attendees examining their STEM ecosystem to identify potential partners who align with their programming and can support student learning.

SPEAKERS:
John Loehr (Science Olympiad: Oakbrook Terrace, IL)

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way of doing the right thing

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175c


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way to engage the community in STEM. Participants will hear from educators that have won money for their school and communities to implement STEM action projects.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how they can receive cash awards and acknowledge for STEM action projects.

SPEAKERS:
John Anderson (Toshiba America Foundation: Irvine, CA)

Cultural Competence Matters: Improving Cultural Competence through Effective Interpersonal Communication

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Culturally relevant pedagogy embodies a professional, political, cultural, ethnical, and ideological disposition that supersedes mundane teaching acts; it is centered in fundamental beliefs about teaching, learning, students, their families, and their communities, and an unyielding commitment to see student success become less rhetoric and more of a reality. This session will aid in building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning. In this session, we will exhibit how to identify the key characteristics of culturally responsive lessons. Attendees will acquire lesson design methods that employ cultural competence and effective communication. Attendees will use collaborate boards during the presentation to respond and interact. Activities to exhibit how students identify with what they know in the classroom will be utilized to help educators make connections and apply this information when planning lessons.

TAKEAWAYS:
Building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Haynes (Baker High School: Baker, LA), Jennifer Norwood (Instructional Support Specialist), Tara Hollins (Exceptional Student Services Educator: Zachary, LA)

The Science of Student Engagement- How stress and the brain affect learning

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181c


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Students find science difficult or non-stimulating particularly when teachers do not consider cognitive, physiological, and socio-emotional disparities in students. Research has shown that engaging the appropriate parts of the brain helps students make a long-lasting, personalized connection to scientific concepts and practices. Studies show that discipline and learning problems in our classrooms may be associated with a lack of student engagement. Engaged students are less likely to be disruptive and are more likely to retain information longer. The focus of this presentation is to equip teachers with the pedagogical skills and strategies needed to drive student engagement and achievement by recognizing and addressing physiological, cognitive, and socio-emotional disparities in students based on an understanding of how a learner’s brain works. Participating teachers will explore the impact of emotions, storytelling, culturally relevant and hands-on learning on the forebrain and consequently on student engagement and comprehension. Teachers will learn to correctly harness the learning power of the forebrain, particularly, those of the hippocampus and amygdala, by appropriately employing suitable learning strategies. These will enhance student engagement, improve learning outcomes and increase academic achievement in the sciences.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn to correctly harness the learning power of the forebrain, particularly, those of the hippocampus and amygdala, by appropriately employing suitable learning strategies

SPEAKERS:
Chidi Duru (Prince George's County Public Schools: Upper Marlboro, MD)

Engaging Students in the Science and Engineering of Food

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Engaging Students in the Science and Engineering of Food
A group of educators is working to develop a series of storylines on food. This is an overview of the first storyline on Producing the Perfect Apple.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Obtaining food to meet our energy and matter needs is a basic requirement of humans and food also defines our culture. This presentation will share how to use elements of the three dimensions of the NGSS and Framework to engage students in making sense of phenomena and problems related to food. Strategies for how to use driving question boards, lesson level learning targets, and engage all learners will be shared. Specific attention will be given for how to align assessments that challenge students to apply their understandings. Participants will engage in a morsel of a storyline on producing the perfect apple. In this storyline, students notice and wonder about different varieties of apples and are challenged to explain why it took 30 years for the Honeycrisp apple to be available to consumers. Students ask questions for how perfect apples are mass produced, how nutrients and environmental factors affect the quality of fruit, and how to attain the right balance of sweet-tart flavor. This storyline weaves together scientific concepts such as meiosis and mitosis, pedigrees and probability, plant structure and function, nutrient cycles, the role of photosynthesis in producing food, and how plants use cellular respiration to survive the winter.

TAKEAWAYS:
Engage in conversations for how to use the three dimensions of the NGSS and the NRC Framework, storylines, driving questions, formative and summative assessments, and hands-on activities to learn science and engineering skills while making sense of one of our most basic needs – FOOD.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)

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