2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments, Equity

 

26 results

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) - An Effective Approach to Ensuring an Inclusive Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines are a tool that can be used to design learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners (CAST, 2018). Instructional designers and teachers can use these principles to create learning environments that reduce barriers to access for all students, while keeping in mind the learning goals of the lesson. The three guiding principles of UDL are engagement, representation, and action and expression. In this session educators will be provided with examples of these principles in action in sample materials from OpenSciEd and classroom videos. In these examples, participating will identify how the materials have been purposefully designed with multiple avenues for engagement, representation, and action and expression. Additionally, they will identify the built-in supports for teachers to highlight student assets and to address potential barriers to learning for their local student population. Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Geometric String Art: Something for Everyone!

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W180



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Geometric String Art.pdf

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

During this session, I will provide participants with black card stock, needles, string, graph paper and tape. We will start by creating the artwork as this will fuel the discussion later. I will walk participants through the steps using a guided slideshow with pictures. They will be given multiple options and allowed to experiment with their selections. I will give them time to work at their tables to create their art and walk around to help. The discussion portion will happen after the art creation. I will ask the groups to share their art with their table. The valuable portion of the session is when we will brainstorm the modifications that can be done to help all students access this activity. I will ask groups to discuss and share out as I create a list. I will add any modifications not already mentioned. Next, I would like the groups to discuss how this can be used in their classes, including the modifications they would need to suit their students. As a take away, participants will have a note taking sheet, access to the slideshow (includes examples and instructions), list of supplies needed and where to purchase, their beautiful artwork, and valuable discussions.

TAKEAWAYS:
In addition to the art work, participants will leave with ideas, templates and modifications for a variety of students.

SPEAKERS:
Terri Serey (Orange Grove Middle School: Hacienda Heights, CA)

Effective Discourse Strategies for Creating Inclusive STEM Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

This session by members of NSTA’s Professional Learning Committee is designed to help teachers deepen their understanding of the effective and practical strategies to facilitate academic discourse that promotes inclusive science and STEM classrooms. Participants will engage in a variety of instructional strategies to ensure that all students have access to scientific discourse, and opportunities to collaborate with peers, through intentional planning. Participants will engage in a variety of formative assessment classroom techniques (FACTS) from Page Keeley’s Uncovering Student Ideas texts, including commit and toss, pro/con pairs, structured think-pair-share, and more. In addition, we will be discussing the shift away from traditional talk patterns- like I-R-E (Initiate, Response, Evaluation) and towards Productive Talk to promote an inclusive science and STEM classroom where discourse supports student sensemaking. Finally, we will provide resources and discussion around the “lead4ward Instructional Strategies Playlist”, which provides teachers with detailed descriptions of specific, instructional strategies. Links to additional discourse resources will also be provided. The instructional strategies used in this presentation will promote student engagement, differentiation, and scientific understanding to help form a more inclusive learning environment where all students can participate in scientific discourse.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will experience a variety of impactful instructional strategies that promote scientific discourse to help create an inclusive STEM learning environment.

SPEAKERS:
Kimberley Astle (Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction: Olympia, WA), Rebecca Garelli (Arizona Dept. of Education: Phoenix, AZ), Angela McMurry (The Ohio Academy of Science: Dublin, OH)

Strategies to Improve Communications in Inclusive Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W181c


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Improve inclusive classroom dynamics between teachers, families, and students by reflecting on disability model perspectives, identifying barriers to collaboration, and determining effective avenues of communication.

TAKEAWAYS:
The triangle of inclusion presents pathways that can be used by administrators and teachers to recognize and overcome barriers faced within the inclusive classroom and includes strategies such as early open communications, student advocacy, professional learning opportunities, and mentorships.

SPEAKERS:
Nicole Wack (East Penn School District: Emmaus, PA)

La Ciencia Del Folklore: Connecting Latino Legends to Elementary Science

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W179b


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

We will model activities that link Latino folktales to science and ELA learning as a means to connect natural phenomena and culture.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will walk away with Latin American folktales that connect to science phenomena for quick implementation in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Ivan Ochoa Martinez (Irene C. Hernandez Middle School for the Advancement of Science: Chicago, IL), Julio Mendez (Friedrich W. Von Steuben Metropolitan Science Center: Chicago, IL), Madison Delaney (Teacher: , IL)

Scientific Tools to Identify and Correct Student Misconceptions

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W186b


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Misconceptions are both worrisome and problematic to STEM educators because students continue to build knowledge on their current understanding, negatively impacting their learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
In this session, participants will be provided with a framework to deconstruct, reconstruct, and construct (D.R.C. Model) the teaching and learning experience in the STEM classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Emily Jackson-Osagie (Southern University and A&M College: Baton Rouge, LA), Catherine Alexander (Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady University: Baton Rouge, LA)

Changing the Mindset: How Labels for Science Courses Can Affect the Academic Achievement of High School Students

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W184a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

This session will focus on how educators can support students to change their mindset in relation to the “labels" used to classify their science courses.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will be able to: 1. understand the impact that labels used to classify science courses—such as regular, honors, or AP—can have in the academic performance of high school students; learn simple strategies that can be implemented in the classroom to help students changing their mindset in regards of the courses that they are taking; and 3. learn how these strategies can contribute to foster a more positive attitude and a more productive culture of learning in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Ileana Bermudez Luna (University of South Florida: Tampa, FL)

Engaging Emergent Multilingual Students in Scientific Sensemaking

Thursday, July 21 • 4:25 PM - 4:55 PM

McCormick Place - W179b


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

A team of high school teachers and university researchers presents a process of their collaboration and learning about teaching multilingual students using an NGSS-focused curriculum.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn how to design and carry out effective and positive collaboration centered around a specific goal (e.g., establishing a clear structure of work cycle) and several key principles for teaching emergent multilingual students that were developed through the collaboration (e.g., multimodality).

SPEAKERS:
Minjung Ryu (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL), Laura Decker (Chicago Public Schools: Chicago, IL), Anna Kordek (Science Teacher: , 0), Maks Malec (Highschool Physics Teacher: , IL)

Lessons Learned: Strategies to Address Invisible Illnesses and Health-Impairment Disabilities in STEM Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W179a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Resources and strategies to support P–12 and postsecondary students in STEM classrooms who have invisible illnesses/ health-impairment disabilities will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will get an overview of resources and strategies that address the need for safe and equitable learning environments for P–12 and postsecondary students with invisible disabilities/ health-impairment illnesses in STEM classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Grim-Hunter (Chicago State University: Chicago, IL)

Science Education for All Preparing Preservice Teachers for Promoting Equity in Elementary Science Methods Classes

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W187b


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Learn about strategies and tools to guide preservice teachers to understand how to provide meaningful experiences for ALL students, including those with special needs.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to support their preservice teachers as they learn how to meet the individual needs of students.

SPEAKERS:
Lisa Brooks (University of Central Florida: Orlando, FL)

TEST Speed Sharing: Creating a Classroom Culture That Supports Equitable Participation

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W183a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
https://my.nsta.org/collection/k3k8DzZ6ckE_E

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Join the members of NSTA as they share how to create a classroom culture that supports equitable participation, and learn how to implement these best practices within your own classroom. A roundtable discussion will follow.

TAKEAWAYS:
Sharing of ideas on creating a classroom culture that supports equitable participation

SPEAKERS:
Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Building a Classroom Community for ALL Students

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W184b-c



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Creating A Learning Community
Slides and resources for establishing a classroom community.
Part 2: Strategies in the Classroom
One lesson with lots of imbedded ideas that help all students. We will look through these and identify these helpful guides as well as have time to share more ideas from your classroom.
Presentation Resources
At this link you will find the presentation as well as resources for all activities discussed in presentation.

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Creating an equitable classroom requires the creation of a learning community that integrates supports for all students to succeed. Learn how to use common strategies with intentionality to build a classroom community that supports sensemaking. In this session participants will learn strategies that allow you to take your students to the next level as a community.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how different strategies can be used to support ALL learners to create a community that learns together.

SPEAKERS:
Megan Elmore (Glenn Westlake Middle School: Lombard, IL), Randie Johnson (Glenn Westlake Middle School: Lombard, IL)

Connecting to Science Identities

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 32


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

This poster session connects phenomena-based teaching to Funds of Knowledge and the development of science identities.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how to support language development in the science classroom. Attendees will learn about the research between developing science identities and success in science. Attendees will learn about Funds of Knowledge and its role in connecting students to the science classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Helen Brandon (Bloomington Junior High School: Bloomington, IL)

Fostering Growth Mindset Through Engineering Design

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 7


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Growth mindset teaching strategies and standards-aligned engineering design challenges were tested with rural elementary students in out-of-school-time and classroom settings. Results, resources, and best practices.

TAKEAWAYS:
In this poster, growth mindset and engineering design will be explored as tools for enhancing student engagement and equity. During 2019-2021, standards-aligned engineering design challenges were tested with different elementary age groups in out-of-school-time and classroom settings (schools, afterschool programs, and 4-H summer camps). For each challenge module, students were given time to explore the topic and test materials, emphasizing the importance of prototype revision so that students viewed each design change as a step toward success. Early outcomes of the research will be shared, as well as resources and best practices for program replication.

SPEAKERS:
Suzanne McDonald (West Virginia University: Morgantown, WV), Jennifer Robertson (West Virginia University: Morgantown, WV)

The Impact of Informal Learning: Accessing and Infusing Inspiration, Education, and Hope into Children from Underserved Communities through Mobile STEM Workshops/Camps.

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 15


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Babyscientist organizes/operates STEM workshops/camps in underserved communities engaging students in hands-on scientific experiments. We’re in the business of creating dreamers, believers, and creating scientist!

TAKEAWAYS:
How our method of informal learning inspires and motivates children of color from underserved communities to pursue careers in STEM.

SPEAKERS:
Kristy McDowell (Merrimack College: North Andover, MA)

Engaging Diverse Learners with Art Integration and Hands-On Science with Tardigrades

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 23


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

This study investigates sixth-grade special education students' achievement, competency beliefs, fascination, and engagement with science. Students learned about tardigrades by participating in a STEAM hands-on investigation. Comparable to this study, Christensen, Knezek, & Tyler-Wood (2015), found hands-on STEM activities were likely to cultivate engagement and maintain “positive dispositions” at middle school levels. Similarly, Hwang & Taylor (2016) found that accessibility through art integration with STEM, engaged and motivated students to participate. While previous studies such as these are significant, there is a lack of research focusing on diverse learners. During this study, students learned basic skills with dissecting and compound microscopes to examine tardigrades. Driving questions included tardigrades’ ability to survive extreme conditions. STEAM was integrated in the unit in the form of dance and painting. Summative assessments included a multiple-choice test with a constructed response question and an art component. Likert scale surveys were used to collect data for action research. The research question was: How do hands-on learning and art integration with tardigrades affect students’ achievement, competency beliefs, engagement and fascination with science? The unit was part of Research Topics in Plant Biology-Systematics at Southern Illinois University Carbondale and Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how hands-on learning and art integration with tardigrades affect students’ achievement, competency beliefs, engagement, and fascination with science.

SPEAKERS:
April Bartnick (Carruthers Elementary School: Murphysboro, IL)

Making Quality Science and STEM Instruction Accessible and Equitable for ALL K-6 Students: Employing Differentiation Strategies and Resources to Advance Achievement, Engagement, Assure Inclusivity, and Meet the Unique Needs of ALL Learners

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W178a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Educators have a mandate to provide quality science/STEM instruction for ALL students, but making instruction accessible to every student presents enormous challenges. In order to teach students with broad ranging abilities and experiences, differentiating science/STEM instruction is imperative. We must differentiate instruction to accommodate the differences in readiness and background knowledge, fluency and facility with English, differences in learning styles, and the broad range of student interests that comprise our schools. Accessibility, inclusivity, and collaboration must be assured for special needs and ELL learners, whose instructional needs can definitely be accommodated with effective differentiation strategies and resources. When teachers differentiate, they enhance learning, creating environments where instruction and assessment are matched to student abilities and needs. Differentiation is an approach involving numerous strategies, while students all access the same curriculum. Content, process, and products can all be differentiated. Students who lack experience and background knowledge can have targeted instruction, to provide hands-on explorations and build knowledge. Likewise, gifted students can extend and expand their science/STEM experiences, keeping them challenged and interested. Presenter will offer strategies and exploration ideas, tiered assignments that increase levels of complexity, instructional grouping and collaboration techniques, and suggest a variety of resources, to enable teachers to advance and evaluate student learning for ALL children. Attendees will actively engage with discourse and exploration of hands-on resources.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendees will learn differentiation strategies to engage all learners actively with hands-on explorations, assuring collaboration and accessibility for ALL, incorporating collaborative explorations where students of varying abilities share the learning experience, to advance learning and deepen conceptual understanding and sense-making for all K-6 students.

SPEAKERS:
Donna Knoell (Educational and Technology Consultant: Overland Park, KS)

Classroom Communities that Thrive through Camaraderie and Connection

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Classroom Communities that Thrive through Camaraderie and Connection Folder

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

It takes time and intentionality to build a community of learners who trust each other, respect differing perspectives, share ideas freely, and seek feedback from their peers. This session explores a variety of strategies that can be easily implemented to build this culture and community from day one. Strategies that foster this type of connection, collaboration, and camaraderie will be discussed using examples and tips to implement in the classroom, starting with some fresh ideas for getting to know students and helping them get to know their classmates. Many of these ideas combine strategies we already know and add a collaborative and inclusive spin to them. Allowing for multiple types of student interaction is important to ensure all voices are heard and valued, not just the loud and proud. Including time for students to process independently, in small groups, and in the large group is important to developing an inclusive community. A variety of strategies will be shared to support these levels of interaction in the classroom, making student thinking visible in individual, small group, and whole group displays.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers can elevate their practices to include all students and develop a classroom culture that invites student interaction, increases student engagement, and fosters equitable experiences on a daily basis.

SPEAKERS:
Beth Pesnell (Kansas State University: Manhattan, KS)

STEM is LIT!

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
STEM is LIT!

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Through the 2021-2022 school year, Pulaski County Special School District sought to scale inclusive STEM experiences throughout grades K-5. Considering the need for sense-making opportunities provided in an inclusive and culturally relevant environment, a new districtwide initiative was birthed- STEM is Lit! STEM is LIT! seeks to take culturally relevant literature as the framework for authentic STEM experiences through sense-making practices. The idea is simple. Find a culturally relevant and diverse piece of literature. Frame a STEM challenge experience around this piece of literature. Design authentic lesson plans and resources for teachers to implement these challenges in their schools. Organize your supplies. Support your teachers and students. By creating districtwide monthly STEM challenges for all students in grades K-5, PCSSD was able to integrate literacy with mathematical sense-making, scientific inquiry, and the engineering design process creating memories that will last a life time. In addition to monthly challenges, STEM is Lit! also became the driving bus behind the Deputy Superintendent's book club for all 4th graders throughout the district, where a special STEM challenge was added and performed at each elementary in the district. This presentation seeks to share those authentic practices that can be scaled in any district to expose broad elementary audiences to equitable STEM experiences and conversation.

TAKEAWAYS:
How can districts expand STEM experiences through culturally relevant and inclusive practices in a large-scaled initiative?

SPEAKERS:
Justin Luttrell (Pulaski County Special School District: Little Rock, AR), Alesia Smith (Pulaski County Special School District: Littel Rock, AR)

E.O. Wilson in the Comics: Biophilia, Biodiversity, and Science Literacy for a More Inclusive Audience

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W181b


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Guide your students to compose elements of graphic novels inspired by the graphic novel version of Naturalist and Black Birder Christian Cooper’s It’s a Bird.

TAKEAWAYS:
Comics and graphic novels can engage diverse learners to understand the nature of STEM and encourage them to craft their own stories, with interdisciplinary thinking across science, social studies, history, math, and language arts.

SPEAKERS:
Dennis Liu (E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation: Durham, NC)

Cultural Competence Matters: Improving Cultural Competence through Effective Interpersonal Communication

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Culturally relevant pedagogy embodies a professional, political, cultural, ethnical, and ideological disposition that supersedes mundane teaching acts; it is centered in fundamental beliefs about teaching, learning, students, their families, and their communities, and an unyielding commitment to see student success become less rhetoric and more of a reality. This session will aid in building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning. In this session, we will exhibit how to identify the key characteristics of culturally responsive lessons. Attendees will acquire lesson design methods that employ cultural competence and effective communication. Attendees will use collaborate boards during the presentation to respond and interact. Activities to exhibit how students identify with what they know in the classroom will be utilized to help educators make connections and apply this information when planning lessons.

TAKEAWAYS:
Building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Haynes (Baker High School: Baker, LA), Jennifer Norwood (Instructional Support Specialist: , 0), Tara Hollins (Exceptional Student Services Educator: Zachary, LA)

Argument-Driven Inquiry as a way to bring three-dimensional instruction to your classroom

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W183c


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. Such learning places the focus squarely on the nature of instruction. It is rooted in ongoing, active experiences that will prompt teachers to expand their content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and expand their beliefs about what is possible inside the classroom. The presenter will guide the participants in a series of focused, small-group demonstration activities that are structured like a typical ADI investigation, allowing teachers to experience instruction as students do.

TAKEAWAYS:
• How to use this instructional model, or way of teaching, to give students an opportunity to learn how to use the DCIs, CCs, and SEPs to make sense of natural phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

The Science of Student Engagement- How stress and the brain affect learning

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181c


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Students find science difficult or non-stimulating particularly when teachers do not consider cognitive, physiological, and socio-emotional disparities in students. Research has shown that engaging the appropriate parts of the brain helps students make a long-lasting, personalized connection to scientific concepts and practices. Studies show that discipline and learning problems in our classrooms may be associated with a lack of student engagement. Engaged students are less likely to be disruptive and are more likely to retain information longer. The focus of this presentation is to equip teachers with the pedagogical skills and strategies needed to drive student engagement and achievement by recognizing and addressing physiological, cognitive, and socio-emotional disparities in students based on an understanding of how a learner’s brain works. Participating teachers will explore the impact of emotions, storytelling, culturally relevant and hands-on learning on the forebrain and consequently on student engagement and comprehension. Teachers will learn to correctly harness the learning power of the forebrain, particularly, those of the hippocampus and amygdala, by appropriately employing suitable learning strategies. These will enhance student engagement, improve learning outcomes and increase academic achievement in the sciences.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn to correctly harness the learning power of the forebrain, particularly, those of the hippocampus and amygdala, by appropriately employing suitable learning strategies

SPEAKERS:
Chidi Duru (Prince George's County Public Schools: Upper Marlboro, MD)

People to Ponder: Using Science History in the NGSS Classroom

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W179a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
People to Ponder

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

This workshop highlights one way to incorporate science history on a routine basis in the science classroom. Participants will receive a brief overview of the neuroscience research that explains why storytelling is emerging as one of the most effective educational tools for students of all ages. They will also explore how telling stories from science history promotes understanding of science practices, supports strong student science identities, and leads to discussion about the human nature of science and the underlying ethical and cultural implications. The presenter will share about the development of People to Ponder, a series of science profiles that can be used throughout a school year. This is not one specific set of scientists but rather a strategy to consistently include science history in instruction. Participants will experience through a student lens what a typical People to Ponder lesson might involve. Once they’ve experienced the strategy, participants will have a chance to reflect on and discuss how they might structure something similar in their classrooms. Participants will be provided with resources and instructional scaffolds that can assist them in their planning. They will leave with at least one activity or lesson planned for implementation in their classroom.

TAKEAWAYS:
Explore a strategy for sharing science biographies that promotes student engagement and understanding of science topics while creating an inclusive and culturally responsive teaching environment.

SPEAKERS:
Anna Babarinde (Sonoma County Office of Education: Santa Rosa, CA)

How to Make In-Person and Remote STEM Instruction Meaningful, Rigorous, and Equitable for Students

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W179b


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. Such learning places the focus squarely on the nature of instruction. It is rooted in ongoing, active experiences that will prompt teachers to expand their content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and expand their beliefs about what is possible inside the classroom. The presenter will guide the participants in a series of focused, small-group demonstration activities that are structured like a typical day’s lesson, allowing teachers to experience instruction as students do. The session will give teachers an opportunity to participate in the same sort of rich and meaningful learning experiences that are called for by the NGSS. Such learning places the focus squarely on the nature of instruction. It is rooted in ongoing, active experiences that will prompt teachers to expand their content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and expand their beliefs about what is possible inside the classroom. The presenter will guide the participants in a series of focused, small-group demonstration activities that are structured like a typical day’s lesson, allowing teachers to experience instruction as students do.

TAKEAWAYS:
• How to make in-person and remote learnings experience more meaningful, relevant, and equitable for students.

SPEAKERS:
Todd Hutner (The University of Alabama: Austin, TX)

The Four Corners Potato: A Story of Indigenous Food Sovereignty, Deep History, and Biology

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W185d



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Indigenous Foods Curriculum Overview
Indigenous Foods Curriculum Slideshow

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

I would like to present an overview of an interdisciplinary curriculum titled Indigenous Foods, which I developed for the Natural History Museum of Utah in partnership with the nonprofit Utah Diné Bikéyah. Weaving together indigenous knowledge, Utah history, archaeological findings, plant biology, and nutritional data, this curriculum shares the importance of indigenous food sovereignty through the story of a tiny, highly nutritious superfood called the Four Corners potato (Solanum jamesii). Over the past 5-10 years, University of Utah researchers, Lisbeth Lauderback (archaeologist) and Bruce Pavlik (botanist), have pieced together evidence from stone tool starch granules, plant genetics, and historical accounts to show that the Four Corners potato is the earliest known domesticated plant in the Western United States. Currently, these same researchers are working closely with Utah Tribes to reincorporate the Four Corners potato into indigenous communities with the hopes of restoring community health and traditional practices. In summary, this curriculum aims to show the importance of including different ways of knowing in science education, as well as to inspire others to learn about the incredible indigenous knowledge that exists within their own communities.

TAKEAWAYS:
Weaving together indigenous food sovereignty, archaeological findings, and plant biology, this curriculum overview offers examples for how to include indigenous knowledge in science education.

SPEAKERS:
Kirsten Walker (Waterford School: Sandy, UT)