2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

Grade Level


Topics




























Strands









Session Type












FILTERS APPLIED:6 - 8, Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments, Life Science

 

9 results

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) - An Effective Approach to Ensuring an Inclusive Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines are a tool that can be used to design learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners (CAST, 2018). Instructional designers and teachers can use these principles to create learning environments that reduce barriers to access for all students, while keeping in mind the learning goals of the lesson. The three guiding principles of UDL are engagement, representation, and action and expression. In this session educators will be provided with examples of these principles in action in sample materials from OpenSciEd and classroom videos. In these examples, participating will identify how the materials have been purposefully designed with multiple avenues for engagement, representation, and action and expression. Additionally, they will identify the built-in supports for teachers to highlight student assets and to address potential barriers to learning for their local student population. Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Francisco, CA)

Lessons Learned: Strategies to Address Invisible Illnesses and Health-Impairment Disabilities in STEM Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W179a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Resources and strategies to support P–12 and postsecondary students in STEM classrooms who have invisible illnesses/ health-impairment disabilities will be shared.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will get an overview of resources and strategies that address the need for safe and equitable learning environments for P–12 and postsecondary students with invisible disabilities/ health-impairment illnesses in STEM classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Nancy Grim-Hunter (Chicago State University: Chicago, IL)

TEST Speed Sharing: Creating a Classroom Culture That Supports Equitable Participation

Friday, July 22 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - W183a



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
https://my.nsta.org/collection/k3k8DzZ6ckE_E

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Join the members of NSTA as they share how to create a classroom culture that supports equitable participation, and learn how to implement these best practices within your own classroom. A roundtable discussion will follow.

TAKEAWAYS:
Sharing of ideas on creating a classroom culture that supports equitable participation

SPEAKERS:
Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Importance of incorporating cultural standards in science instruction - Rural West Alaska as a case study.

Friday, July 22 • 11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 18



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Official Booklet of Alaska Education Cultural Standards
28 page document describing the cultural standards used to complement Education in Alaska

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Alaska has cultural standards take an important role in science instruction. Using rural Alaska for case studies, learn how cultural standards can enhance science teaching.

TAKEAWAYS:
Session participants will learn: 1. what cultural standards are; 2. how they were applied in instruction in several sites in the YK Delta in Alaska; and 3. how the proper application of cultural standards can be applied in any setting with any demographic group.

SPEAKERS:
Andrew West (Lower Kuskokwim School District: Bethel, AK)

Cultural Competence Matters: Improving Cultural Competence through Effective Interpersonal Communication

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W185b-c


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Culturally relevant pedagogy embodies a professional, political, cultural, ethnical, and ideological disposition that supersedes mundane teaching acts; it is centered in fundamental beliefs about teaching, learning, students, their families, and their communities, and an unyielding commitment to see student success become less rhetoric and more of a reality. This session will aid in building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning. In this session, we will exhibit how to identify the key characteristics of culturally responsive lessons. Attendees will acquire lesson design methods that employ cultural competence and effective communication. Attendees will use collaborate boards during the presentation to respond and interact. Activities to exhibit how students identify with what they know in the classroom will be utilized to help educators make connections and apply this information when planning lessons.

TAKEAWAYS:
Building awareness and sensitivity to the culture-based genius that students bring to the classroom using science inquiry strategies. Emphasis will be placed on a model for the inclusion of culturally relevant content that accommodates student backgrounds and methods of learning.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Haynes (Baker High School: Baker, LA), Jennifer Norwood (Instructional Support Specialist: , 0), Tara Hollins (Exceptional Student Services Educator: Zachary, LA)

Creating Science Literacy and Building Inclusivity through the Lens of Wildlife Cams

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W194a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Live-streaming wildlife cams give students an intimate, 24/7 look into the amazing and diverse world of animals, allowing teachers to engage all students in inquiry-based and phenomena-based learning as nature unfolds in real-time, with no script, and with unknown outcomes. Wildlife cams can encourage questioning and curiosity, can build connections to wildlife and the environment, and are intrinsically interesting to teachers and students alike. While the NGSS Standards posit that students need to learn science by doing science, teachers often struggle to support learners in developing science practices and understanding Nature of Science (NOS). We will share ideas for teaching science in ways that are culturally relevant by combining three key pedagogical frameworks—science inquiry, NOS, and culturally responsive teaching (CRT)—while harnessing the excitement and fun of wildlife cams. By using CRT and free cams that bring wildlife into the classroom, we can broaden the participation of historically underrepresented youth in science and amplify the science learning benefits of connecting with nature. Teachers we’ve worked with report that cams engaged students who might otherwise have few opportunities to be immersed in nature, including those in urban settings, with mobility challenges, and in remote learning environments.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will discover a variety of wildlife cams and explore how they can be used to support culturally responsive teaching and build scientific observation skills.

SPEAKERS:
Kelly Schaeffer (The Cornell Lab of Ornithology: Ithaca, NY)

The Science of Student Engagement- How stress and the brain affect learning

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W181c


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Students find science difficult or non-stimulating particularly when teachers do not consider cognitive, physiological, and socio-emotional disparities in students. Research has shown that engaging the appropriate parts of the brain helps students make a long-lasting, personalized connection to scientific concepts and practices. Studies show that discipline and learning problems in our classrooms may be associated with a lack of student engagement. Engaged students are less likely to be disruptive and are more likely to retain information longer. The focus of this presentation is to equip teachers with the pedagogical skills and strategies needed to drive student engagement and achievement by recognizing and addressing physiological, cognitive, and socio-emotional disparities in students based on an understanding of how a learner’s brain works. Participating teachers will explore the impact of emotions, storytelling, culturally relevant and hands-on learning on the forebrain and consequently on student engagement and comprehension. Teachers will learn to correctly harness the learning power of the forebrain, particularly, those of the hippocampus and amygdala, by appropriately employing suitable learning strategies. These will enhance student engagement, improve learning outcomes and increase academic achievement in the sciences.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will learn to correctly harness the learning power of the forebrain, particularly, those of the hippocampus and amygdala, by appropriately employing suitable learning strategies

SPEAKERS:
Chidi Duru (Prince George's County Public Schools: Upper Marlboro, MD)

Welcome to Hogwarts: STEM-ing with Harry Potter

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W178b



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Email addresses.PNG
STEMming with Harry Potter.pdf

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

Enter a magical world with your students where everyone becomes enchanted with STEM. This budget-friendly lesson can engage and excite your students! Cross-curricular materials provided!

TAKEAWAYS:
1. The cross-curricular unit uses common cost-effective materials, as well as STEM topics, to promote learning for all students in the classroom; 2. there are a variety of assessment tools for different student ability levels, including participation assessments, written assessments, and verbal assessments; and 3. this "station-based" lesson will keep students moving through the STEM topics, captivated by the activities, learning without knowing it is happening.

SPEAKERS:
Elesha Goodfriend (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN), Kelly Moore-Roberts (Walters State Community College: Morristown, TN)

The Four Corners Potato: A Story of Indigenous Food Sovereignty, Deep History, and Biology

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W185d



(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)
Indigenous Foods Curriculum Overview
Indigenous Foods Curriculum Slideshow

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

I would like to present an overview of an interdisciplinary curriculum titled Indigenous Foods, which I developed for the Natural History Museum of Utah in partnership with the nonprofit Utah Diné Bikéyah. Weaving together indigenous knowledge, Utah history, archaeological findings, plant biology, and nutritional data, this curriculum shares the importance of indigenous food sovereignty through the story of a tiny, highly nutritious superfood called the Four Corners potato (Solanum jamesii). Over the past 5-10 years, University of Utah researchers, Lisbeth Lauderback (archaeologist) and Bruce Pavlik (botanist), have pieced together evidence from stone tool starch granules, plant genetics, and historical accounts to show that the Four Corners potato is the earliest known domesticated plant in the Western United States. Currently, these same researchers are working closely with Utah Tribes to reincorporate the Four Corners potato into indigenous communities with the hopes of restoring community health and traditional practices. In summary, this curriculum aims to show the importance of including different ways of knowing in science education, as well as to inspire others to learn about the incredible indigenous knowledge that exists within their own communities.

TAKEAWAYS:
Weaving together indigenous food sovereignty, archaeological findings, and plant biology, this curriculum overview offers examples for how to include indigenous knowledge in science education.

SPEAKERS:
Kirsten Walker (Waterford School: Sandy, UT)