2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:6 - 8, Hands-On Workshop, Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments, Sensemaking

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
25 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) - An Effective Approach to Ensuring an Inclusive Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines are a tool that can be used to design learning experiences that meet the needs of all learners (CAST, 2018). Instructional designers and teachers can use these principles to create learning environments that reduce barriers to access for all students, while keeping in mind the learning goals of the lesson. The three guiding principles of UDL are engagement, representation, and action and expression. In this session educators will be provided with examples of these principles in action in sample materials from OpenSciEd and classroom videos. In these examples, participating will identify how the materials have been purposefully designed with multiple avenues for engagement, representation, and action and expression. Additionally, they will identify the built-in supports for teachers to highlight student assets and to address potential barriers to learning for their local student population. Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will utilize a tool to help them analyze their own lessons to identify goals, potential barriers, and ways to use the UDL Principles to remove barriers and create flexible paths to learning.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Delaney (OpenSciEd: San Carlos, CA)

Using tools to sense and interact with the environment

Thursday, July 21 • 8:20 AM - 9:20 AM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Using tools to sense and interact with the environment.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

After learning about computational thinking, participants will apply the framework to determine where students engage in computational thinking within the activity. Participants will engage in activities where students engineer as part of the investigations. Participants will be able to use a pre-programmed microcontroller (loaned by the presenters) to experience 3 different short investigations each tied to a different phenomenon. 1) Does angle matter? How does the angle of the collector affect how warm it is? Using the microcontroller and lamps participants will collect data to build a model that explains why the tilt of the Earth creates different seasons. 2) Transparent, Translucent, and Opaque. When working in a greenhouse, different materials can be used to cover the greenhouse. Which is the best material for your area? Using the light level sensor on the microcontroller, participants test different materials to recommend their uses when designing a greenhouse. 3) Making an alarm - using the microcontroller accelerometer sensor, participants arm an alarm and see how the accelerometer works in three dimensions. Participants will be provided printed copies of the lesson plans and how to engage students with using the microcontrollers. Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment brought is necessary to participate in this workshop.

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn (1) Microcontrollers are small computers that come with several integrated sensors. Their functionality makes them useful for both investigations and engineering projects. Some of the basic functionality of different microcontrollers (2) One definition of computation thinking is how to use computers to solve problems. Computational thinking activities that connect students to everyday phenomena. The development of algorithms or the decomposition of problems into simple steps are just two examples of processes associated with computation thinking. It is a powerful problem-solving technique that is used in the modern world (3) How engineering tasks provide opportunities for student sensemaking

SPEAKERS:
Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS)

The Meaning Beyond the Words

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W178a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://my.nsta.org/collection/ktURlAGyUA4_E

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

For years, research on the language of classrooms explored how the way we say things impacts students’ sense of belonging. This session uses the NSTA Teacher Tip Tuesday—The Meaning Beyond The Words: How Language, Race, and Culture Impact Science Teaching and Learning web seminar to consider how we signal to students that we value their ideas and how they communicate those ideas in the science classroom and what we can do as educators to help ensure our students know they belong in the classroom and can do science. Participants will learn about opportunities to continue the learning after the session ends through NSTA’s new Professional Learning Units.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Become aware of how we signal (or don’t signal) to students their ideas and how they communicate their ideas are valued in the science classroom; and 2. Learn strategies to support students in building on their ideas and each other's ideas to move toward building deep conceptual understanding of big ideas in science (disciplinary core ideas).

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Broaden Science Participation: Unpack “Analyze & Interpret” to Teach Data As an Equalizer

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W179b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Access to Resource Document
Complete this Google Form to access the Resource Document and a slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

We live in a data-driven world, and our students will be working in a data-driven workforce. Therefore, it is critical that our Pre-K-12 students learn foundational data literacy skills. However, currently these skills are too often only taught in upper-level classes. All students need these skills and all students, down to our little Pre-Kers, can work with and make sense of science data. Let’s make sure data is an equalizer, rather than another divider in our educational system and society! Join us as we explore what perception and learning science tell us about how our brains process data. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources to build science knowledge and self-efficacy through data. Finally, we will explore ways to adapt our existing curriculum activities and data visualizations to help our students more equitably access science. Through hands-on activities and group discussions, participants will leave more empowered to leverage data and data visualizations into their science content in purposeful ways for all learners. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall 21st century skills. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century for all students and ways to adjust existing curriculum to leverage data as entry points into science inquiry, sensemaking, and knowledge for all learners to see themselves in STEM.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, LLC)

We Are All Explorers

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NGFTA Alumni--Workplace Skills

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

How are you engaging all students in critical skills to ensure they are ready for the future of work? What does the classroom feel, sound, and look like when students are making sense of their world and solving real-world problems? Join the alumni from the 2021 Northrop Grumman Foundation Teachers Academy as they share the ways they have transformed their schools/classrooms to align with the reality of work as experienced alongside engineers, technologists, and scientists.

TAKEAWAYS:
Strategies to integrate workforce skills aligned with the vision of the K–12 Framework.

SPEAKERS:
Rachel Kenning (Spring Creek Middle School: Providence, UT), Anthony Carter (Middle River Middle School: Middle River, MD), Yevgeny Pevzner (Kearns Junior High School: Salt Lake City, UT), Leilani O'Dell (Roscomare Road Elementary School: No City, No State)

Hexagonal Thinking in the Science Classroom

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W185d


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Hexagonal Thinking ensures the learning environment features a high degree of student engagement by providing a framework for academic discussion where all students participate. Participants will collaborate with colleagues to experience Hexagonal Thinking using science and math content vocabulary and visuals that will then be used to synthesize information into a piece of critical writing.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn a strategy for making thinking, learning and content connections visible in the classroom.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Yates (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX), Miranda Rosenhoover (Aledo ISD: Aledo, TX)

Using the NSTA Sensemaking Tool to Support Creating, Revising, and Selecting High-Quality Science Lessons

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
https://my.nsta.org/collection/x2paxwvcfUQ_E

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Gain experience using the NSTA Sensmaking Tool to become critical consumers of curricular materials and support creating/revising lessons for sensemaking.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Learn how to use the NSTA Sensemaking Tool to review science lessons for the four critical aspects of sensemaking; and 2. Understand how to use the Sensemaking Tool to support creating and revising existing science lessons for sensemaking.

SPEAKERS:
Kate Soriano (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Science Teachers ARE Math Teachers: Integrating Mathematical Thinking into Sensemaking

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W185a


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Using real-world phenomena asks students to puzzle out answers to problems that occur in their day-to-day lives. It encourages students to enter into sensemaking using their own prior knowledge and tools. One of the best tools to make sense of a phenomenon is math. Learn from CCSS Math and NGSS specialists about using mathematical thinking to promote scientific literacy. This session includes a focus on student agency, sensemaking, and supporting connections between the STEM classroom and real-world phenomena. The presenters will map CCSS Mathematics and NGSS connections while providing strategies for increasing agency and sensemaking in the classroom. Questions we will consider include: How do we support all students in becoming mathematical thinkers? How do we promote agency by providing students with authentic, engaging opportunities to collect, analyze, and interpret real-world data? How can phenomena and questioning techniques support mathematical thinking?  Come explore new possibilities of what high-quality sensemaking with math can look like for all learners.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will take away strategies to integrate mathematical thinking into student sensemaking about scientific phenomena.

SPEAKERS:
Emily Mathews (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Alanna Mertens (DePaul University STEM Center: Chicago, IL)

Geometric String Art: Something for Everyone!

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W180



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Geometric String Art.pdf

STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

During this session, I will provide participants with black card stock, needles, string, graph paper and tape. We will start by creating the artwork as this will fuel the discussion later. I will walk participants through the steps using a guided slideshow with pictures. They will be given multiple options and allowed to experiment with their selections. I will give them time to work at their tables to create their art and walk around to help. The discussion portion will happen after the art creation. I will ask the groups to share their art with their table. The valuable portion of the session is when we will brainstorm the modifications that can be done to help all students access this activity. I will ask groups to discuss and share out as I create a list. I will add any modifications not already mentioned. Next, I would like the groups to discuss how this can be used in their classes, including the modifications they would need to suit their students. As a take away, participants will have a note taking sheet, access to the slideshow (includes examples and instructions), list of supplies needed and where to purchase, their beautiful artwork, and valuable discussions.

TAKEAWAYS:
In addition to the art work, participants will leave with ideas, templates and modifications for a variety of students.

SPEAKERS:
Terri Serey (Orange Grove Middle School: Hacienda Heights, CA)

Effective Discourse Strategies for Creating Inclusive STEM Classrooms

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W181a


STRAND: Strategies for Creating Inclusive Science and STEM Learning Environments

Show Details

This session by members of NSTA’s Professional Learning Committee is designed to help teachers deepen their understanding of the effective and practical strategies to facilitate academic discourse that promotes inclusive science and STEM classrooms. Participants will engage in a variety of instructional strategies to ensure that all students have access to scientific discourse, and opportunities to collaborate with peers, through intentional planning. Participants will engage in a variety of formative assessment classroom techniques (FACTS) from Page Keeley’s Uncovering Student Ideas texts, including commit and toss, pro/con pairs, structured think-pair-share, and more. In addition, we will be discussing the shift away from traditional talk patterns- like I-R-E (Initiate, Response, Evaluation) and towards Productive Talk to promote an inclusive science and STEM classroom where discourse supports student sensemaking. Finally, we will provide resources and discussion around the “lead4ward Instructional Strategies Playlist”, which provides teachers with detailed descriptions of specific, instructional strategies. Links to additional discourse resources will also be provided. The instructional strategies used in this presentation will promote student engagement, differentiation, and scientific understanding to help form a more inclusive learning environment where all students can participate in scientific discourse.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will experience a variety of impactful instructional strategies that promote scientific discourse to help create an inclusive STEM learning environment.

SPEAKERS:
Kimberley Astle (Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction: Olympia, WA), Rebecca Garelli (Arizona Science Teachers Association), Angela McMurry (The Ohio Academy of Science: Dublin, OH)

Data, Tables, Graphs, Oh My! Strategies to Get All Students Doing & Speaking Science

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W176c



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Access to Resource Document
Complete the Google Form to gain access to the Resource Document and slide deck from the workshop.

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

We are naturally curious, prone to ask why? How? What? Unfortunately, somewhere along the way students lose the trust in their voices to ask questions of and from data. But data are what we use to do science and it permeates all aspects of society today. What should we do? Stop teaching the vocabulary of science and data first, and instead leverage classroom-ready strategies to empower students to lead with their innate curiosity to practice critical 21st century data literacy skills and master the science content. Join us to explore connections between our science content, inquiry-based activities, and data skills. We will experience research-based strategies and freely available resources for integrating phenomenon-based and local data into our science instruction to promote science literacy and student empowerment. We will participate in activities ourselves and reflect on approaches for how to bring these into our classrooms. Participants will leave more empowered to integrate data into their science content in purposeful ways to better help students do and communicate science. Working with and learning science from data fosters critical thinking skills, lifelong interests in science, and facilitates learners’ overall self-identity as a scientist. Let’s set all of our students up for success!

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will identify how data literacy is a critical aspect of science literacy in the 21st century, how students can do a lot more with data than we often think or presume from their science vocabulary alone, and how to leverage existing strategies to authentically integrate data into 6-12 science instruction to teach their science content and increase literacy simultaneously.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Hunter-Thomson (Dataspire Education & Evaluation, LLC)

Beyond the Chocolates! Using grants to fund your classroom projects.

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Beyond the Chocolates
Grant writing for educators.
Beyond the Chocolates- Grant Writing for Educators
Beyond the Chocolates- Grant Writing for Educators

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

The objective of this workshop is to guide educators through a mock grant-writing process. We will begin the session by discussing the grant process from proposal requests to awards. We will discuss misconceptions such as tax-exempt status requirements, time constraints, deliverables, project impact, collaboration, and more. Participants will have the opportunity to go through the process by searching for grants and completing a mock proposal. They will be provided with “step by step” guides to help them design a project, clarify their project objectives, create a budget, and determine the impact for their students, schools, and community. Participants will present their proposals and provide peer-to-peer feedback during the discussion part of the session.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to write a grant proposal for a classroom project.

SPEAKERS:
Emilia Odife (Lake Mary Preparatory School: Lake Mary, FL)

Leveraging the Last Dimension: Crosscutting Concepts Across Grade Levels

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W184a


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

In this workshop, participants will engage in an activity demonstrating the power of the CCCs as a tool for guiding student thinking and teacher collaboration.

TAKEAWAYS:
The CCCs can be used as a tool to reach a desired learning objective while also vertically collaborating around the grade level–specific details they encompass.

SPEAKERS:
Sarah Stults (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL), Chandra James (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL), Saswati Koya (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL)

Engage in teacher developed activities that will allow your students to experience

Friday, July 22 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
NSTA2022teacherinfo.docx
background information and simple worksheets to collect data

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

In this session, the participants will explore some lessons developed by teachers in the National Space Biomedical Research Institute-Teacher Academy Project (NSBRI-TAP). These are interactive, physical and focus on spatial disorientation and the musculoskeletal system as affected by microgravity. The teachers will engage in the activities and collect sample data as they would with students and interpret the results. These are both educational and fun as we need to desperately restore enthusiasm for science studies. The presenter has anecdotal stories from many astronauts of their physiological reaction to microgravity conditions that he will share. Teachers will be provided lesson plans and worksheets for use with their students. Sample activities: Title: IN-FLIGHT EXERCISES Grade Level: 5-8 Content Area: Life Science and Health National Science Content Standards: Standard A. Science as Inquiry (Grades 5-8 & 9-12) • Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry • Understandings about scientific inquiry Standard C. Life Science (Grades 5-8) • Structure and function in living systems • Regulation and behavior Standard F. Science in Personal and Social Perspectives (Grades 5-8 & 9-12) • Personal health Title: SHIFTY EYES Grade Level: 5-8 Content Area: Space/Life Science National Science Content Standards: Unifying Concepts and Processes (Grades 5-8) Models Standard C. Life Science (Grades 5-8) Structure and function in living systems Regulation and behavior Diversity and adaptations of organisms Dr. Wilson also participated in two experiments on NASA’s KC-135 (Vomit Comet): 1) testing a resistance exercise machine to fly in space designed at The Cleveland Clinic and 2) an experiment where the corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea) was subjected to microgravity while a control group of worms was grown by elementary students in Las Cruces, NM. He will explain and share the results of these experiments and of one flown by teachers from Miami-Dade School District in Florida involved in his Future Scientists Program.

TAKEAWAYS:
The International Space Station (ISS) is a research platform and is helping scientists develop countermeasures to the adverse effects of long-duration spaceflight on the human body.

SPEAKERS:
Craig Wilson (Texas A&M University: College Station, TX)

Problem Centered Teaching by Tomorrow

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W193a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation Link

STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Problem centered instruction is a great way to engage students, integrate content, inspire learning, and naturally incorporate all three dimensions of the NRC Framework. However, true problem centered instruction requires a major shift in both teaching and learning, requiring the one thing teachers don't have: time--the last thing teachers need is another pedagogical strategy that disrupts their entire routine. Teachers will have the opportunity to voice their concerns and discuss some barriers of problem centered teaching and learning, while also addressing the benefits for both teachers and students. Considering the benefits, there are some immediate changes that teachers can use to help shift to a problem centered environment. Recalling that problem centered learning should be complex, meaningful, and open-ended, the four strategies are: 1) Make the Content Relatable, 2) Structure: Less is More, 3) Be a Resource, Not an Answer Key, and 4) Use a Problem to Introduce a Topic. Teachers will then have an opportunity to put the strategies to immediate use by picking a lesson or topic and work with others to transform it into a three-dimensional, problem centered lesson.

TAKEAWAYS:
Teachers will explore four strategies that promote three-dimensional learning through the process of problem centered instruction that is complex, meaningful, and open-ended. They will discuss benefits and barriers to the problem centered approach from the perspective of both the instructor and the learner. Teachers will have an opportunity to brainstorm and work collaboratively on transforming a lesson or topic of their choice into a problem centered, reality based scenario that seamlessly integrates the Science and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas.

SPEAKERS:
Cassandra Armstrong (Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy: Aurora, IL)

Phenomenal STEM: Finding Authentic Problems to Solve in the K–8 Classroom

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Are identifying and choosing relevant, authentic problems to put in front of your students holding you back from providing opportunities to engage your students in engineering design? In this workshop, gain insight into what makes a problem instructionally productive. We’ll also explore resources available to support you in selecting problems to put in front of your students and strategies to help students identify problems they want to pursue individually or in small groups for STEM competitions or their own interests.

TAKEAWAYS:
Explore authentic problems to solve in your STEM classrooms.

SPEAKERS:
Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Reasoning is Reachable: New Tools for Supporting Scientific Argumentation in Amplify Science Units

Saturday, July 23 • 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

McCormick Place - W187c


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Engaging in argument from evidence is often the culminating scientific practice for units focused on sensemaking. High-quality units present students with a driving question about a meaningful, complex phenomenon and engage them in a variety of practices to investigate the driving question. A significant challenge that students face in an extended unit is keeping track of the evidence they are collecting and connecting that evidence to the key scientific concepts. Over the last four years, researchers at The Learning Partnership and Northern Illinois University have been collaborating with middle school science teachers at two Chicago elementary schools to co-design tools for supporting students in developing scientific arguments. (1) The Investigation Steps chart uses the NGSS storyline structure to highlight how students will use scientific practices to conduct their investigations and then record what was figured out each day. (2) The Evidence Sorter provides a structure for organizing and weighing evidence and connecting that evidence to reasoning as a precursor to writing their argument. Prior research shows the importance of connecting evidence to key concepts throughout a unit. The tools provide a means for teachers to monitor how students are making these connections and applying those connections in their final argument.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Introduction to tools for supporting students in connecting what is learned each day to the unit goal. 2. Introduction to tools for supporting students in synthesizing evidence and connecting reasoning to develop a scientific argument. 3. Research shows the importance of connecting evidence and key concepts throughout a unit

SPEAKERS:
Stephanie Morales (John W. Garvy: Chicago, IL), Randi McGee-Tekula (The Learning Partnership: Western Springs, IL), Emily Dubicki (Mozart Elementary: Chicago, IL), Anne Britt (Dr.: Dekalb, IL), Steven McGee (The Learning Partnership: Western Springs, IL)

How do science teachers stay effective? Practical implications and strategies based on research

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W176c


STRAND: Coping in Resilience in Science and STEM Teaching

Show Details

This presentation will use a mixture of hands-on activities and discussion questions to engage participants in the themes from research about how science teachers stay effective during challenging times For example, through our research, we have found science teachers often have a strong desire to help their students become better people and create an equitable classroom. They describe that they have goals for their students such as being critical thinkers, problem-solvers, creative, and collaborative. Our session will work to have the participants generate the types of attributes they want in their own students. We will then demonstrate two teaching scenarios: one based on best practices in science education and the other being a teacher-centered approach. We will have participants then analyze the teaching scenarios using the goals they have to determine which has more culturally responsive teaching practices. We will also engage students in a hands-on activity using a gravity well that connects to MS-PS2-4. We will use the activity to discuss culturally responsive teaching practices in science teaching including scaffolding, effective questioning, a method to analyze teaching, and using experiences and phenomena to help students deeply engage in all three dimensions of the NGSS.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about inclusive teaching strategies that help science teachers stay effective.

SPEAKERS:
Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)

Science Is Social! Student Ideas at the Center of Phenomenon-Driven, Three-Dimensional Teaching and Learning (Secondary)

Saturday, July 23 • 10:40 AM - 11:40 AM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Explore how NSTA’s phenomena-driven lessons/units motivate students to engage in science practices to make sense of science ideas they need to explain how or why the phenomenon occurs.

TAKEAWAYS:
Understand the critical attributes of sensemaking. Strategies for intentional sequences of student interactions to provide access to participation and learning for all students. Students’ strategic use of modalities (talk, text, gestures, drawings, etc.)

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Holly Hereau (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Programming Simple Tools to Facilitate Science Inquiry Investigations.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Participants will learn about the framework for computational thinking and then learn to apply it to science inquiry investigations using Block Coding (used with students in elementary and middle school in many jurisdictions) and how it can be used to improve the conduct of science investigations (and be more like the investigations conducted by scientists).   Participants will apply the computational thinking framework to creating/modifying/using simple programs (either using a free online programming tool OR with a simple, inexpensive microcontroller that will be loaned by the presenters) that can be used in science inquiry investigations either for conducting the investigation (e.g., a random number generator) or for collecting data (e.g., a counter and a timer). Investigations where these can be used will be discussed and demonstrated. The use of the microcontrollers and/or a free online programming tool to develop a simple measurement tool provides participants (and their students) an opportunity to experience a simulated situation a scientist or engineer would face as they use computing tools to develop automated measuring responses.   Finally, as an example of what is known as “physical computing”, participants will learn to build (and will build if time allows) a physical interface (to use with a computer or Chromebook) that allows them to interact with a program they have either written or downloaded.   Participants will be provided printed copies of example lesson plans and instruction sheets on how to engage students with using the Scratch program and the microcontrollers). Note that no knowledge of coding or any equipment is necessary to participate in this workshop. 

TAKEAWAYS:
Attendees will learn how computational thinking (applied to simple block coding examples and simple micro-controllers) can be used in science classrooms to help students conduct better inquiry investigations and better experience “authentic” science practices.

SPEAKERS:
G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS), Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO)

Ignite Your Professional Teaching Practice with NSTA’s Trilogy of Three-Dimensional Resources

Saturday, July 23 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Join us as we explore how NSTA’s three-dimensional resources can be utilized to enhance your teaching. Walk away with effective strategies for science teaching and learning and hear from educators as they provide tips for using these resources.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Hear from classroom teachers about how they are using NSTA Press publications; 2. Learn how to use NSTA resources to shift your practice ; 3. Leave with top-notch teaching tips and innovative lesson plan ideas that promote imaginative learning and student engagement; and 4. Leave with strategies to use in your classroom to promote student engagement in science learning.

SPEAKERS:
Christine Anne Royce (Shippensburg University: Shippensburg, PA), Wendy Binder (Program Director, STEM Professional Learning: Arlington, VA)

Facilitating Inquiry for Growth in Science and Engineering Practices: Exploring Surface Heating

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W178a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Exploring Surface Heating.pdf
UHI Observations.pdf

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

Learning through place-based, student-centered, teacher-facilitated STEM inquiry increases student engagement in and ownership of learning and promotes student growth in science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and crosscutting concepts. Using a unit plan I developed for exploring local microclimates, participants will engage in activities and discussion of techniques for cultivating students as collaborators in the learning process. The unit is designed to encourage growth in asking questions, designing and conducting investigations, collecting data, making sense of data, communicating findings, and identifying local problems and designing solutions to a student-identified problem. Participants will use NASA infrared images of surface temperatures captured during an ISS mission to observe the urban heat island phenomenon. They will explore Google Earth to spark questions about surface heating that can be answered through investigation of the local neighborhood or school campus. Given a list of equipment that students used during the unit, participants will collaboratively design an investigation to collect place-based data. Discussion includes extension activities that facilitate student understanding of surface heating and cooling. Discussion also includes how revision and reflection can be used to monitor individual student growth and promote ownership of learning by students. Emphasis is on facilitation techniques.

TAKEAWAYS:
Learning through place-based, student-centered, teacher-facilitated STEM inquiry increases student engagement in and ownership of learning and promotes student growth in science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and crosscutting concepts.

SPEAKERS:
Loris Chen (Science Education Consultant: Fair Lawn, NJ)

NASA STEM: Computational Thinking: Crew Transportation with Orion

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175a


STRAND: No Strand

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The free NASA STEM lesson plans introduce the practice of computational thinking and include elements of a real NASA mission. NASA’s Artemis program will return humans to the lunar surface for the first time since 1972, the year of the agency's last Apollo moon landing. This Educator Guide provides four standards-aligned activities to help students learn about NASA's Orion spacecraft that will take astronauts to the Moon and beyond. In this session, we will design and build a crew module model that will secure two 2-cm astronaut figures during a drop test. The PowerPoint will be available to all participants. The PowerPoint will include the videos and activities including the tips and pointers. Session Outline: 5 min - Welcome and Introduction to NASA Artemis Mission 10 min- STEM Engagement strategies and culturally relevant teaching 10 min- Introducing the Engineering Design Challenge 20 min- Teams Design a Crew Vehicle 10 min- Testing the Crew Vehicle 5 min- Reviewing the Resources and Q and A https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/np-2020-02-2805-hq.pdf

TAKEAWAYS:
NASA provides free educational resources that include educator guides with standards-aligned activities to help students use computational thinking while including elements of real NASA missions.

SPEAKERS:
Susan Kohler (NASA Glenn Research Center: Cleveland, OH)

From Typhoid Mary to COVID-19: Pursuing an Understanding of Disease Transmission and Tracking Through Integrative STEM

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
From Typhoid Mary to COVID-19.pptx.pdf

STRAND: No Strand

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The exploration of the intersection of science and technology at the turn of the 20th century through present times is examined in this session by beginning with the case study of Typhoid Mary and ending with how Integrative STEM has impacted all areas of COVID-19 Participants use the radio function of the MICROBITs, a computer program called infection models to examine how contagious diseases are spread across a population. After considering how Typhoid was tracked at the time Mary Mallon was an asymptomatic cook, participants first try the simulation without any "vaccinated" participants. Then, participants come up with a method(s) for preventing the radio signal from teaching their MICROBIT and participate in the scenario a second time. Data is collected each round and participants solve which one was patient zero.

TAKEAWAYS:
Engage in a simulation that integrates technology (micro:bits), historical studies, and sense making activities around a current event topic.

SPEAKERS:
Susan German (Hallsville Middle School: Hallsville, MO), G. Michael Bowen (Mount Saint Vincent University: Halifax, NS), Christine Anne Royce (Shippensburg University: Shippensburg, PA), Beverly DeVore-Wedding (Nebraska Indian Community College: Meeker, CO)

NASA's Newest X-plane: "X-57 -- It's Electrifying!"

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W193a


STRAND: No Strand

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Did you know that every U.S. aircraft flying today, and every U.S. air traffic control facility, uses NASA-developed technology in some way? Participants in this session will gain insights into how NASA Aeronautics work to make aviation truly sustainable by reducing delays and environmental impacts, transforming aviation efficiency and safety, while reducing noise, fuel use, harmful emissions, and ultimately transform the way we fly. NASA’s X-57 Maxwell is an experimental aircraft designed to test operating multiple electric motors for use in turning propellers – an idea known as “distributed electric propulsion.” This session highlights an activity from NASA’s “X-57 Electric Airplane: STEM Learning Module” (https://www.nasa.gov/aeroresearch/stem/X57 ) part of a series of Educator Guides with lessons and activities to help students learn about NASA’s X-57 Maxwell and the science behind electric propulsion. This session will focus on the “X-57 Maxwell: Circuits Activity Guide” that engages participants to build a light-up paper helicopter by creating a “parallel circuit” that uses copper foil tape, two LED lights, and a battery. This session’s goals are to demonstrate that an all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly. Session participants will understand that knowledge gained from the X-57 Maxwell research will help engineers design future electric-powered aircraft for everything from urban air mobility to moving passengers and cargo between nearby cities.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Attendees will explore NASA STEM Educator Guides that are standards-aligned and provide detailed information and resources on how to implement NASA STEM engagement learning experiences in the classroom. 2. Hands-on minds-on experience with implementing a NASA STEM activity in their classroom that encourages students to create a parallel circuit on a paper helicopter as an introduction to circuitry and propulsion. 3. Attendees will gain insights into how NASA’s X-57 Maxwell all-electric airplane is more efficient, quieter, and more environmentally friendly while gaining a better understanding of the STEM concepts of energy transfer, and the physical science of pressure and aerodynamics.

SPEAKERS:
LaTina Taylor (NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC): Flossmoor, IL)

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