Vernier Graphical Analysis™ Pro - Dec2022
 

2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 8 results

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Using GeoSpatial Data to Teach Climate Justice

McCormick Place - W176a

Let's discuss the expansion and availability of geospatial data (arcGIS, EJScreen, CalAdapt) to examine environmental justice issues in their own community and create climate resilience action plans for an authentic audience (city council, school district, state lawmakers).

Takeaways: Attendees will explore strategies for using geospatial data to examine, interpret, and act on place-based environmental justice issues in their communities.

Speakers

Nancy Metzger-Carter (Sonoma Academy: Santa Rosa, CA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation
Resources, curriculum, lesson plans, sample case studies of student advocacy
Link to Schools for Climate Action Campaign
Free resources for student advocacy for climate justice on local, state and federal level.

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Kiss the Ground: Why is a Covered Planet a Healthy Planet?

McCormick Place - W184b-c

In this session participants are introduced to the lesson Why is a covered planet a healthy planet? In this lesson, students use a digital tool to analyze large data sets available from NASA Earth Observations to identify spatial and temporal patterns that can help support (or refute) the claim that tilling the land in spring (Northern Hemisphere) causes an increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere and the growing crops causes the amount to decrease in summer. This lesson is based on ideas presented in the film Kiss the Ground.

Takeaways: Why is a Covered Planet a Healthy Planet? provides students with an opportunity to analyze large data sets in order to support or refute a claim about the effect tilling the land in the spring has on carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere.

Speakers

Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/ca_scvmXiXtk_E

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Phenomena to Questions: Practical Engagement Strategies for Student Sensemaking

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Explore how to use phenomena to generate student questions that allow for further investigation to support student sensemaking.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to effectively use phenomena to allow for authentic student questioning and how to use those questions to increase student engagement and sensemaking.

Speakers

Nicole Vick (Northwestern University: No City, No State)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Phenomena to Questions .pdf

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Discussion-Based Learning: How to Use Talk as a Tool

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Academic discourse is a vital part of promoting student sensemaking. Learn how discourse can be used to promote equity and access in the science classroom.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to use discussion strategies in the classroom to move student thinking forward, use talk as a formative assessment, and build a classroom culture that promotes student discussion.

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Cheryl Knight (Orland Junior High School: Orland Park, IL)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Transforming Teaching Through Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Carnegie Corporation of New York released a challenge paper calling on the education field to transform teaching and learning through the elements and essentials of curriculum-based professional learning. Learn how schools and systems are helping teachers experience the instruction their students experience to help change instructional practices, leading to better student outcomes.

Takeaways: 1. Explore the rationale for a challenge paper dedicated solely to the issue of curriculum-based professional learning; 2. Discover the 10 elements and three essentials of professional learning critical to effective implementation of high-quality science instructional materials; and 3. Consider implications of the roles and responsibilities for putting into action the elements of curriculum-based professional learning.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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A River Story: Designing STEM Learning Experiences in an Equitable Context for Young Learners with Diverse Backgrounds

McCormick Place - W184b-c

Dive into (equitable) three-dimensional learning and promote STEM teaching and sensemaking strategies that place equity at the center of learning, making science connections to local context.

Takeaways: Explore how placing equity at the center of STEM education changed teacher attitudes about science teaching and learning, developed supportive networks for formal and informal educators to advance science education, created opportunities for teachers to design three-dimensional learning experiences, and provided equitable opportunities for students and families in an urban high-needs district.

Speakers

Elizabeth Nunez (New Brunswick Public Schools: New Brunswick, NJ), Sarah Sterling-Laldee (Paterson Public Schools: Paterson, NJ), Ashley Delgado-D'Amore (Lord Stirling Community School: New Brunswick, NJ), Grace Lugo (New Brunswick Public Schools: New Brunswick, NJ)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Engaging Students in the Science and Engineering of Food

McCormick Place - W196a

Obtaining food to meet our energy and matter needs is a basic requirement of humans and food also defines our culture. This presentation will share how to use elements of the three dimensions of the NGSS and Framework to engage students in making sense of phenomena and problems related to food. Strategies for how to use driving question boards, lesson level learning targets, and engage all learners will be shared. Specific attention will be given for how to align assessments that challenge students to apply their understandings. Participants will engage in a morsel of a storyline on producing the perfect apple. In this storyline, students notice and wonder about different varieties of apples and are challenged to explain why it took 30 years for the Honeycrisp apple to be available to consumers. Students ask questions for how perfect apples are mass produced, how nutrients and environmental factors affect the quality of fruit, and how to attain the right balance of sweet-tart flavor. This storyline weaves together scientific concepts such as meiosis and mitosis, pedigrees and probability, plant structure and function, nutrient cycles, the role of photosynthesis in producing food, and how plants use cellular respiration to survive the winter.

Takeaways: Engage in conversations for how to use the three dimensions of the NGSS and the NRC Framework, storylines, driving questions, formative and summative assessments, and hands-on activities to learn science and engineering skills while making sense of one of our most basic needs – FOOD.

Speakers

Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Engaging Students in the Science and Engineering of Food
A group of educators is working to develop a series of storylines on food. This is an overview of the first storyline on Producing the Perfect Apple.

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Going Beneath the Surface: Using socioscientific issues to help students engage in 3D learning.

McCormick Place - W185a

Socioscientific issues are scientific topics that require students to engage in meaningful discussions (Zeidler & Nichols, 2009). Additionally, engaging students in socioscientific issues can promote equity, diversity, and help students question biases (Goldsmith et al., 2021). Importantly, these issues are often most likely to promote inclusivity if students have a connection with them. Considering we live in the Midwest, we often use socioscientific issues surrounding agricultural practices. We start with a phenomenon that introduces the example socioscientific issue by showing a video about tilling. We then ask, “Should farmers till the land?” To explore this question, we engage participants by jigsawing four different hands-on activities related to the soil. Participants will explore compact vs. loose soil, reducing water erosion, reducing erosion caused by wind and snow, and the effect of a heat lamp on the temperature of soil. Participants will use science and engineering practices such as planning and carrying out investigations and analyzing and interpreting data. We will debrief the activities and model how we help students make sense of the science ideas. We will finish the presentation by discussing how to find suitable socioscientific issues, include culturally responsive teaching practices, and provide some strategies for integrating with the NGSS.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about how to use socioscientific issues and culturally responsive practices to engage students with social issues that require scientific knowledge.

Speakers

Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)