2022 Chicago National Conference

July 21-23, 2022

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FILTERS APPLIED:9 - 12, Presentation, Students and Sensemaking Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning, Assessment

 

Rooms and times subject to change.
11 results
Save up to 50 sessions in your agenda.

Did I really just flip this classroom?

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W185a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Presentation note taking worksheet

STRAND: Adapting Virtual Learning to Increase Access and Participation in a Face-to-Face Classroom

Show Details

The purpose of the presentation is to model how to flip a classroom from the traditional methods to more innovative methods to engage students. The participants will be able to create a deck by the end of the session. Participants will be given the background and research based strategies that Pear Deck uses to ensure that equity and inclusion are met while ensuring the seamless integration of the platform. Participants will be given the pedagogy of why this tool is needed in their classroom. Participants will be introduced to EdPuzzle and Screencastify to highlight how these tools can be used as well to flip their classrooms. A Pear Deck interactive slide will be presented to the audience. The audience will log in with the given code. As I present the audience will have my screen on their device. The audience will participate in a series of interactive activities designed to immerse them platform and give them the experience that students will have. The presentation is highly interactive with the first half of the presentation be using to interact with the platforms and the second half given for participants to explore and ask questions. The audience will be engaged with device-based activities from the beginning to the end of the presentation. The presentation style will be catch and release. I will capture their attention for some time and then I will release them to navigate through the platforms while I offer support. Attendees will learn how to create a Pear Deck, a screencastify recording and how to navigate through EdPuzzle to either create or utilize existing videos. Attendees will learn how to take the materials they are already using to flip them into a more blended learning model. The attendees will walk away with a Deck that can be used immediately in their classroom and my information to reach out to me if they have any questions during implementation.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will walk away with the basic knowledge of how to flip their classroom and be able to implement the strategies immediately into their classroom so that they are able to increase equity and inclusion.

SPEAKERS:
Cecelia Gillam (Hahnville High School: La Place, LA)

Engineering for Us All: Exploring the "Why," "What," and "Who" of Engineering

Thursday, July 21 • 9:40 AM - 10:40 AM

McCormick Place - W194a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Baseball card lesson
Baseball card lesson (complete)
More information on e4usa
Playpump lesson
Product archaeology lesson
Robot arm lesson (with materials list)
Shoe sole sketch and design lesson
Slides from presentation

STRAND: Using Inquiry-Based STEM to Facilitate Learning for ALL

Show Details

“You’re good at math; be an engineer.” Isn’t there more to it? Who is an engineer? Engineering helps society by solving problems. Let’s explore “why.”

TAKEAWAYS:
Learn that engineering is more than math + science and take away classroom activities addressing engineering identity, ethics, and society (not your typical engineering activities).

SPEAKERS:
Ken Reid (University of Indianapolis: Indianapolis, IN)

Including Teachers in Developing Large-Scale Assessments for Science

Thursday, July 21 • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b


STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

Learn about the novel approach taken by Illinois to include teacher voice in developing a statewide three-dimensional science assessment.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn about the process of developing a state-wide assessment written by local educators.

SPEAKERS:
Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Harvey Henson (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: Carbondale, IL), ANGELA BOX (Southern Illinois University Carbondale: CARTERVILLE, IL)

Installation Science Exhibits as Assessment Options

Thursday, July 21 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W187c


STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

To help develop more scientifically curious and literate students, we use scientific literature or documentaries to engage students in developing the NGSS science practices. Students find an interesting topic, generate a question, collect and analyze data and then develop a Science Installation that communicates their learning to the greater community. Our most recent class project had students study how to grow food in a simulated Mars environment with the conditions controlled by student programmed raspberry pis. High school students organized 6th graders to do hands on data collection. They created a 10x12 foot exhibit that looked like a Martian landscape and highlighted the equipment they used with the plants still growing. The display included QR codes to communicate data and research using student-created videos, infographics, and data tables. Other installations include a monochromatic yellow room where everything looks grey and allowed observers to learn about the properties of light and the ways light energy is used in photosynthesis, the way it can be used to promote electrons, and the way it produces color. Other exhibits include sound waves and a history or music and musical instruments, the chemistry of color, and an environmental study of our use of carbon.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how to guide students in the reading of scientific literature or the watching of documentaries in order to generate an authentic question and project. (How can we develop the capacity to farm on Mars? How does yellow monochromatic light produce the absence of color (an episode of Abstract, What can we learn about pollen structure from 3D printed files from Bayer’s agricultural division?) Participants will review a process to take the question and generate an authentic study that transcends a single class, grade, or discipline. (Students in 11th grade worked with students in 6th grade to test growing plants under controlled conditions that simulated Mars. Students in art and physics classes explored the properties of light and created a light-based art exhibit with science lessons on QR codes) Participants will explore a template for guiding students through the creation of an installation/exhibit that creatively shows the question, their experiment, their analysis, and potential solutions or conclusions in a creative and community-informing way. The exhibit is similar to an art installation with QR codes and experiment/study artifacts presented in a museum like scenario.

SPEAKERS:
Elizabeth Helfant (Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School: Saint Louis, MO)

Inclusive Grading of 3-D Science

Thursday, July 21 • 3:40 PM - 4:10 PM

McCormick Place - W178b


STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

How can grading better represent students’ 3-D learning? This workshop will take a specific focus on grading phenomenon-driven curricula that do not have typical worksheets.

TAKEAWAYS:
Standards-based grading and careful selection of student work aligned to lesson-level PEs for feedback can help make 3-D learning more meaningful for students.

SPEAKERS:
Kerri Wingert (Good Question Research: Boulder, CO)

Why Are They Not Curious Anymore?

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W184d



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Why Are They Not Curious Anymore.pptx
PowerPoint slides presented during the conference, with speaker notes.

STRAND: Developing Scientific Literacy in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

Sagan said that when kids are young, they cannot stop asking questions. By high school, they stop asking. This needs to change.

TAKEAWAYS:
Ways we can help students learn and retain science concepts, critical-thinking skills, and inquisitiveness using alternative approaches to teaching.

SPEAKERS:
Juan Bacigalupi (Eagle Hill School: Hardwick, MA)

What do these numbers actually mean? Rethinking Student Grades and Scoring.

Thursday, July 21 • 5:10 PM - 5:40 PM

McCormick Place - W181b



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Biology Assessment Standards.docx
What do these numbers actually mean.pptx

STRAND: Promoting Effective Assessments in the Science and STEM Classroom

Show Details

A grading system based on total points does not accurately reflect the level of student understanding of science content. Students who demonstrate that they understand half of the content should not earn a failing score. Nor should students earn arbitrary points for doing non-science content related things. Student scores should reflect what a student understands and not how well the student can play the game we call school. We teachers are encouraged to do standards based grading, but not everyone knows how or where to start or even if it is worth putting forth the effort to make the change. Participants will be led through my journey in becoming a teacher who uses standards based grading. The struggles in changing my mindset about grades and the way I grade will be presented as well as the benefits of having a better understanding of what the students actually know, having student grades more accurately reflect what they know, having fewer students fail among other things. Basic strategies for assessing level of understanding will also be presented. Time will be given for questions and answers.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will be given strategies about changing their view of scoring students by the total number of points they got correct verses the student's level of understanding.

SPEAKERS:
Meredith Diehl (Northview High School: Sylvania, OH)

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way of doing the right thing

Friday, July 22 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W175c


STRAND: Learn and Lead: Developing a Community for Expanded Participation in Science and STEM

Show Details

Toshiba America Foundation wants to work together with teachers who are looking for a better way to engage the community in STEM. Participants will hear from educators that have won money for their school and communities to implement STEM action projects.

TAKEAWAYS:
Participants will learn how they can receive cash awards and acknowledge for STEM action projects.

SPEAKERS:
John Anderson (Toshiba America Foundation: Irvine, CA)

3D Assessment that Leverages Interest & Identity

Friday, July 22 • 3:40 PM - 4:40 PM

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a


STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Phenomenon-driven assessments can be aligned to standards and engaging to students. This session will answer the question, “How can a 3D assessment engage students’ interest and identity while promoting high-quality science learning?” We call this “5-dimensional” assessment. We will present several examples of phenomenon-driven assessments in grades 5-12 and deconstruct them. What makes them engaging? How does a 3D task unfold over several questions? Where are the big science ideas? Then, we will analyze the student work that 5-dimensional assessments can generate in order to see what 3D learning can result from aligned tasks. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of how to construct a 3D task, investigate student interests, and give meaningful feedback to students that goes beyond “right and wrong” multiple-choice questions. The final part of the presentation will offer examples of tools participants can use to adapt their own assessments by 1) finding meaningful phenomena, 2) connecting the DCIs, SEPs, and CCCs, and 3) writing prompts that integrate all dimensions.

TAKEAWAYS:
How to design meaningful, interest & identity driven 3D assessments for secondary students

SPEAKERS:
Kerri Wingert (Good Question Research: Boulder, CO)

Your Students Can Be the First to Annotate (Discover the Function of) a Gene in a Microorganism

Saturday, July 23 • 9:20 AM - 10:20 AM

McCormick Place - W195



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Final NSTA Gene Annotation for Conference.pptx

STRAND: No Strand

Show Details

This hands-on project guides students through discovering the function of a microorganism gene (whose function has not yet been determined), assigned uniquely to that student.

TAKEAWAYS:
1. Science is very exciting. Each student in the Geni-Act project will be the first person to discover the function of a gene in a microorganism. Results are entered into a national genome database; 2. The gene annotation process will be provided. Special tools or special knowledge are not required. There is no cost; and 3. Guidance for doing the annotation process with an inclusion class (a general education class with several special education students) will be provided.

Engaging Students in the Science and Engineering of Food

Saturday, July 23 • 2:20 PM - 3:20 PM

McCormick Place - W196a



(Only registered attendees may view session materials. Please login with your NSTA account to view.)
Engaging Students in the Science and Engineering of Food
A group of educators is working to develop a series of storylines on food. This is an overview of the first storyline on Producing the Perfect Apple.

STRAND: Students and Sensemaking: Promoting Science and STEM Teaching Strategies That Place Equity at the Center of Learning

Show Details

Obtaining food to meet our energy and matter needs is a basic requirement of humans and food also defines our culture. This presentation will share how to use elements of the three dimensions of the NGSS and Framework to engage students in making sense of phenomena and problems related to food. Strategies for how to use driving question boards, lesson level learning targets, and engage all learners will be shared. Specific attention will be given for how to align assessments that challenge students to apply their understandings. Participants will engage in a morsel of a storyline on producing the perfect apple. In this storyline, students notice and wonder about different varieties of apples and are challenged to explain why it took 30 years for the Honeycrisp apple to be available to consumers. Students ask questions for how perfect apples are mass produced, how nutrients and environmental factors affect the quality of fruit, and how to attain the right balance of sweet-tart flavor. This storyline weaves together scientific concepts such as meiosis and mitosis, pedigrees and probability, plant structure and function, nutrient cycles, the role of photosynthesis in producing food, and how plants use cellular respiration to survive the winter.

TAKEAWAYS:
Engage in conversations for how to use the three dimensions of the NGSS and the NRC Framework, storylines, driving questions, formative and summative assessments, and hands-on activities to learn science and engineering skills while making sense of one of our most basic needs – FOOD.

SPEAKERS:
Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)

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