NASCAR 2022-23
 

2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 11 results

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Scaffolding Students’ Progression Through CCCs and SEPs Using Resources from the OpenSciEd Toolkit

McCormick Place - W186c

See how tools developed within OpenSciEd units can support students’ progression of and engagement in SEPs and CCCs across a variety of unit contexts.

Takeaways: Participants will leave with practical tools such as graphic organizers, general rubrics, and self- and peer-assessments that can be used to support students in incrementally building SEPs and CCCs in a variety of units.

Speakers

Dawn Novak (Science Educator: Grayslake, IL), Gail Housman (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Jamie Deutch Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA 2022 Chicago - SEP and CCC Toolkit Slides.pdf
https://www.openscied.org/teacher-resources/

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Kiss the Ground: Why is a Covered Planet a Healthy Planet?

McCormick Place - W184b-c

In this session participants are introduced to the lesson Why is a covered planet a healthy planet? In this lesson, students use a digital tool to analyze large data sets available from NASA Earth Observations to identify spatial and temporal patterns that can help support (or refute) the claim that tilling the land in spring (Northern Hemisphere) causes an increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere and the growing crops causes the amount to decrease in summer. This lesson is based on ideas presented in the film Kiss the Ground.

Takeaways: Why is a Covered Planet a Healthy Planet? provides students with an opportunity to analyze large data sets in order to support or refute a claim about the effect tilling the land in the spring has on carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere.

Speakers

Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

https://my.nsta.org/collection/ca_scvmXiXtk_E

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Overview of Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate Initiative, and Kikim Media

McCormick Place - W184b-c

This session will introduce participants to Our Beautiful Planet,  a collection of classroom-ready films and lesson plans that highlight the science and engineering practices scientists use to explain the phenomenon of climate change. The collection of over 10 lessons brings Sensemaking to environmental science by cultivating student curiosity with engaging and eye-popping phenomena.

Takeaways: Our Beautiful Planet is a series of compelling 5-7 minute science films and lessons highlighting the cutting-edge research that climate scientists are doing to solve some of the world’s most pressing issues.

Speakers

Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate In

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Engaging students in problem-based learning through environmental innovation challenges

McCormick Place - W195

The Innovate to Mitigate (I2M) project empowers teachers to employ a problem-based learning approach to incorporate climate change education in their classrooms. Teachers, regardless of whether they teach language arts, science, engineering, or math, work with students to identify potential causes of climate change and to develop a prototype as a potential solution. Collaborative student teams, utilizing the various strengths and interests that they bring from diverse backgrounds, design and develop their projects and finally create a competition pitch. I2M provides a structure for teaching climate change throughout the school year, supports students to discuss their developing mitigation ideas with peers across the nation, and provides an outside incentive for them to work towards an end goal. We propose a mini-simulation of the competition experience where teachers, acting as students, participate in the sensemaking promoted by the competition. Teachers read a short article about an aspect of climate change, brainstorm in small groups to propose a solution that mitigates the problem, and discuss mitigation ideas with other workshop attendees. Facilitators present ideas for collaboration among their students and across the hall with other teachers, identify key NGSS integration opportunities, provide examples of student projects, and help teachers think about integrating such a project into their own classrooms.

Takeaways: Teachers will learn how to identify entry points for climate change education that capitalize on student desires to make a difference about climate change, support collaboration, and incorporate three-dimensional sensemaking.

Speakers

Santiago Gasca (TERC: Cambridge, MA), Natalie Stapert (Master Reading Coordinator: Potomac, MD)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Phenomena to Questions: Practical Engagement Strategies for Student Sensemaking

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Explore how to use phenomena to generate student questions that allow for further investigation to support student sensemaking.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to effectively use phenomena to allow for authentic student questioning and how to use those questions to increase student engagement and sensemaking.

Speakers

Nicole Vick (Northwestern University: No City, No State)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Phenomena to Questions .pdf

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Promoting the 5th C-(Citizenship) of 21st Century Skills and CRE into an Inclusive STEAM Classroom

McCormick Place - W176c

The use of inclusive STEAM pedagogy is the forefront of using NRC Framework, Hill’s model, and 21st Century skill in unison for generating a sustainable STEAM curriculum. In this presentation, a demonstration of how to utilize these frameworks into creating project-based learning units that showcase diversity and the embodiment of students seeing diversity in the STEAM careers. The NRC framework will include SEPs for developing and using a model, planning and caring for an investigation, and using mathematical and computational thinking and CCCs of cause and effect, structure and function, and energy and matter. The use of the NRC framework with sensemaking (phenomena, science and engineering practices, student ideas, and science ideas) was the basis for developing a hurricane unit for 6th grade and macromolecule unit for 8th grade. Both of these units are grounded in these frameworks and the 5 C’s (communication, critical thinking, collaboration, creativity, citizenship) and the Hill’s model for cultural and historical education (CRE). All these frameworks are woven together on the Hill model lesson plan template to create hands-on PBL for the students. This presentation will give both STE(A)M and science teachers ideas on how to create a curriculum that incorporates more inclusivity and diversity while showcasing the work of my students.

Takeaways: How to create a lesson that incorporates the 5 C's, CRE, SEPs, CCCs, and sense making into a lesson.

Speakers

Jenniffer Stetler (Chamblee Middle School: Chamblee, GA)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Discussion-Based Learning: How to Use Talk as a Tool

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Academic discourse is a vital part of promoting student sensemaking. Learn how discourse can be used to promote equity and access in the science classroom.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to use discussion strategies in the classroom to move student thinking forward, use talk as a formative assessment, and build a classroom culture that promotes student discussion.

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Cheryl Knight (Orland Junior High School: Orland Park, IL)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Speed Sharing: Creating a High School Classroom Culture That Supports Student Sensemaking

McCormick Place - W196c

Join the members of the NSTA High School Committee as they share how they incorporate sensemaking into their classrooms and learn how to implement these best practices within your own classroom. A roundtable discussion will follow.

Takeaways: 1. High school science sensemaking discussion; 2. Implementation strategies of sensemaking; and 3. Networking with other high school teachers.

Speakers

Ruth Hutson (Blue Valley High/Middle School: Randolph, KS)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Transforming Teaching Through Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Carnegie Corporation of New York released a challenge paper calling on the education field to transform teaching and learning through the elements and essentials of curriculum-based professional learning. Learn how schools and systems are helping teachers experience the instruction their students experience to help change instructional practices, leading to better student outcomes.

Takeaways: 1. Explore the rationale for a challenge paper dedicated solely to the issue of curriculum-based professional learning; 2. Discover the 10 elements and three essentials of professional learning critical to effective implementation of high-quality science instructional materials; and 3. Consider implications of the roles and responsibilities for putting into action the elements of curriculum-based professional learning.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Reasoning is Reachable: New Tools for Supporting Scientific Argumentation in Amplify Science Units

McCormick Place - W187c

Engaging in argument from evidence is often the culminating scientific practice for units focused on sensemaking. High-quality units present students with a driving question about a meaningful, complex phenomenon and engage them in a variety of practices to investigate the driving question. A significant challenge that students face in an extended unit is keeping track of the evidence they are collecting and connecting that evidence to the key scientific concepts. Over the last four years, researchers at The Learning Partnership and Northern Illinois University have been collaborating with middle school science teachers at two Chicago elementary schools to co-design tools for supporting students in developing scientific arguments. (1) The Investigation Steps chart uses the NGSS storyline structure to highlight how students will use scientific practices to conduct their investigations and then record what was figured out each day. (2) The Evidence Sorter provides a structure for organizing and weighing evidence and connecting that evidence to reasoning as a precursor to writing their argument. Prior research shows the importance of connecting evidence to key concepts throughout a unit. The tools provide a means for teachers to monitor how students are making these connections and applying those connections in their final argument.

Takeaways: 1. Introduction to tools for supporting students in connecting what is learned each day to the unit goal. 2. Introduction to tools for supporting students in synthesizing evidence and connecting reasoning to develop a scientific argument. 3. Research shows the importance of connecting evidence and key concepts throughout a unit

Speakers

Stephanie Morales (John W. Garvy: Chicago, IL), Randi McGee-Tekula (The Learning Partnership: Western Springs, IL), Emily Dubicki (Mozart Elementary: Chicago, IL), Anne Britt (Dr.: Dekalb, IL), Steven McGee (The Learning Partnership: Western Springs, IL)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Going Beneath the Surface: Using socioscientific issues to help students engage in 3D learning.

McCormick Place - W185a

Socioscientific issues are scientific topics that require students to engage in meaningful discussions (Zeidler & Nichols, 2009). Additionally, engaging students in socioscientific issues can promote equity, diversity, and help students question biases (Goldsmith et al., 2021). Importantly, these issues are often most likely to promote inclusivity if students have a connection with them. Considering we live in the Midwest, we often use socioscientific issues surrounding agricultural practices. We start with a phenomenon that introduces the example socioscientific issue by showing a video about tilling. We then ask, “Should farmers till the land?” To explore this question, we engage participants by jigsawing four different hands-on activities related to the soil. Participants will explore compact vs. loose soil, reducing water erosion, reducing erosion caused by wind and snow, and the effect of a heat lamp on the temperature of soil. Participants will use science and engineering practices such as planning and carrying out investigations and analyzing and interpreting data. We will debrief the activities and model how we help students make sense of the science ideas. We will finish the presentation by discussing how to find suitable socioscientific issues, include culturally responsive teaching practices, and provide some strategies for integrating with the NGSS.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about how to use socioscientific issues and culturally responsive practices to engage students with social issues that require scientific knowledge.

Speakers

Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)