NASCAR 2022-23
 

2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 11 results

Thursday, July 21
3:40 PM - 4:10 PM
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Genome: Unlocking Life's Code - Genetics Resources from NSTA and NIH

McCormick Place - W184b-c

In this session, participants will be given an overview of the Food Allergy Storyline, a High School Unit that addresses LS1.A and LS3.A. The anchoring phenomenon for the unit is something familiar yet still mysterious to this generation of students - bans on certain foods in their cafeterias and classrooms. Students will probably be able to connect the bans to food allergies but might not be able to explain why a person has food allergies. The first day of the unit allows students to consider what they do and don't know about food allergies and what they want to find out. This gives them a reason for investigating the biological mechanism behind food allergies and intolerances. In doing so, they will make sense of Disciplinary Core Ideas related to genetics and genomics.

Takeaways: The Food Allergy Storyline provides an opportunity for students to make sense of Disciplinary Core Ideas related to genetics and genomics.

Speakers

Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Genome: Unlocking Life's Code Collection

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Scaffolding Students’ Progression Through CCCs and SEPs Using Resources from the OpenSciEd Toolkit

McCormick Place - W186c

See how tools developed within OpenSciEd units can support students’ progression of and engagement in SEPs and CCCs across a variety of unit contexts.

Takeaways: Participants will leave with practical tools such as graphic organizers, general rubrics, and self- and peer-assessments that can be used to support students in incrementally building SEPs and CCCs in a variety of units.

Speakers

Dawn Novak (Science Educator: Grayslake, IL), Gail Housman (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Jamie Deutch Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA 2022 Chicago - SEP and CCC Toolkit Slides.pdf
https://www.openscied.org/teacher-resources/

Thursday, July 21
5:10 PM - 5:40 PM
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Overview of Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate Initiative, and Kikim Media

McCormick Place - W184b-c

This session will introduce participants to Our Beautiful Planet,  a collection of classroom-ready films and lesson plans that highlight the science and engineering practices scientists use to explain the phenomenon of climate change. The collection of over 10 lessons brings Sensemaking to environmental science by cultivating student curiosity with engaging and eye-popping phenomena.

Takeaways: Our Beautiful Planet is a series of compelling 5-7 minute science films and lessons highlighting the cutting-edge research that climate scientists are doing to solve some of the world’s most pressing issues.

Speakers

Patrice Scinta (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Our Beautiful Planet: Climate Change Films and Lessons from NSTA, The Climate In

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Phenomena to Questions: Practical Engagement Strategies for Student Sensemaking

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Explore how to use phenomena to generate student questions that allow for further investigation to support student sensemaking.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to effectively use phenomena to allow for authentic student questioning and how to use those questions to increase student engagement and sensemaking.

Speakers

Nicole Vick (Northwestern University: No City, No State)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Phenomena to Questions .pdf

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Discussion-Based Learning: How to Use Talk as a Tool

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Academic discourse is a vital part of promoting student sensemaking. Learn how discourse can be used to promote equity and access in the science classroom.

Takeaways: Attendees will learn how to use discussion strategies in the classroom to move student thinking forward, use talk as a formative assessment, and build a classroom culture that promotes student discussion.

Speakers

Kristin Rademaker (NSTA: Arlington, VA), Cheryl Knight (Orland Junior High School: Orland Park, IL)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Transforming Teaching Through Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Carnegie Corporation of New York released a challenge paper calling on the education field to transform teaching and learning through the elements and essentials of curriculum-based professional learning. Learn how schools and systems are helping teachers experience the instruction their students experience to help change instructional practices, leading to better student outcomes.

Takeaways: 1. Explore the rationale for a challenge paper dedicated solely to the issue of curriculum-based professional learning; 2. Discover the 10 elements and three essentials of professional learning critical to effective implementation of high-quality science instructional materials; and 3. Consider implications of the roles and responsibilities for putting into action the elements of curriculum-based professional learning.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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A River Story: Designing STEM Learning Experiences in an Equitable Context for Young Learners with Diverse Backgrounds

McCormick Place - W184b-c

Dive into (equitable) three-dimensional learning and promote STEM teaching and sensemaking strategies that place equity at the center of learning, making science connections to local context.

Takeaways: Explore how placing equity at the center of STEM education changed teacher attitudes about science teaching and learning, developed supportive networks for formal and informal educators to advance science education, created opportunities for teachers to design three-dimensional learning experiences, and provided equitable opportunities for students and families in an urban high-needs district.

Speakers

Elizabeth Nunez (New Brunswick Public Schools: New Brunswick, NJ), Sarah Sterling-Laldee (Paterson Public Schools: Paterson, NJ), Ashley Delgado-D'Amore (Lord Stirling Community School: New Brunswick, NJ), Grace Lugo (New Brunswick Public Schools: New Brunswick, NJ)

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Reasoning is Reachable: New Tools for Supporting Scientific Argumentation in Amplify Science Units

McCormick Place - W187c

Engaging in argument from evidence is often the culminating scientific practice for units focused on sensemaking. High-quality units present students with a driving question about a meaningful, complex phenomenon and engage them in a variety of practices to investigate the driving question. A significant challenge that students face in an extended unit is keeping track of the evidence they are collecting and connecting that evidence to the key scientific concepts. Over the last four years, researchers at The Learning Partnership and Northern Illinois University have been collaborating with middle school science teachers at two Chicago elementary schools to co-design tools for supporting students in developing scientific arguments. (1) The Investigation Steps chart uses the NGSS storyline structure to highlight how students will use scientific practices to conduct their investigations and then record what was figured out each day. (2) The Evidence Sorter provides a structure for organizing and weighing evidence and connecting that evidence to reasoning as a precursor to writing their argument. Prior research shows the importance of connecting evidence to key concepts throughout a unit. The tools provide a means for teachers to monitor how students are making these connections and applying those connections in their final argument.

Takeaways: 1. Introduction to tools for supporting students in connecting what is learned each day to the unit goal. 2. Introduction to tools for supporting students in synthesizing evidence and connecting reasoning to develop a scientific argument. 3. Research shows the importance of connecting evidence and key concepts throughout a unit

Speakers

Stephanie Morales (John W. Garvy: Chicago, IL), Randi McGee-Tekula (The Learning Partnership: Western Springs, IL), Emily Dubicki (Mozart Elementary: Chicago, IL), Anne Britt (Dr.: Dekalb, IL), Steven McGee (The Learning Partnership: Western Springs, IL)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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A Museum’s Approach to Making Sense of Chicago’s Urban Ecosystem

McCormick Place - W186a

In this workshop, participants will explore Chicago Academy of Sciences/Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum program models that use local, real world phenomena and object based learning to center student sensemaking. We will examine how our curriculum development process leverages local urban spaces, local specimens from both our living and preserved collections, and the work of museum conservation scientists to create opportunities for students to engage in rigorous and authentic science practice. We’ll unpack how a local focus increases both relevance and accessibility. We’ll reflect on the role of iteration in sensemaking, on the benefits of building in routines for revising explanations that allow teachers - and students - to trust the power of these collaboratively constructed student ideas to drive the learning. During the workshop, teachers will experience as learners how the wonder and inclusivity of local natural phenomena provide rigorous and accessible starting points for student driven inquiry. Finally, we will explore how learning ecosystems that connect in school learning with personal experiences can foster positive attitudes toward nature and science, and strategize opportunities for leveraging local natural spaces, institutions and resources to connect students to authentic sensemaking experiences.

Takeaways: Participants will explore phenomena grounded in Chicago's urban ecosystems and strategize opportunities for leveraging local natural spaces, institutions and resources to connect students to authentic sensemaking experiences.

Speakers

Yukako Kawakatsu (Chicago Academy of Sciences/Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum: Chicago, IL), Melissa Siska (Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum: Chicago, IL)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Engaging Students in the Science and Engineering of Food

McCormick Place - W196a

Obtaining food to meet our energy and matter needs is a basic requirement of humans and food also defines our culture. This presentation will share how to use elements of the three dimensions of the NGSS and Framework to engage students in making sense of phenomena and problems related to food. Strategies for how to use driving question boards, lesson level learning targets, and engage all learners will be shared. Specific attention will be given for how to align assessments that challenge students to apply their understandings. Participants will engage in a morsel of a storyline on producing the perfect apple. In this storyline, students notice and wonder about different varieties of apples and are challenged to explain why it took 30 years for the Honeycrisp apple to be available to consumers. Students ask questions for how perfect apples are mass produced, how nutrients and environmental factors affect the quality of fruit, and how to attain the right balance of sweet-tart flavor. This storyline weaves together scientific concepts such as meiosis and mitosis, pedigrees and probability, plant structure and function, nutrient cycles, the role of photosynthesis in producing food, and how plants use cellular respiration to survive the winter.

Takeaways: Engage in conversations for how to use the three dimensions of the NGSS and the NRC Framework, storylines, driving questions, formative and summative assessments, and hands-on activities to learn science and engineering skills while making sense of one of our most basic needs – FOOD.

Speakers

Chris Embry Mohr (Olympia High School: Stanford, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Engaging Students in the Science and Engineering of Food
A group of educators is working to develop a series of storylines on food. This is an overview of the first storyline on Producing the Perfect Apple.

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Starting with Complex Macroscopic Phenomena - A Different Approach to Teaching Cells & Genetics & Evolution

McCormick Place - Skyline W375b

Complex biological phenomena, such as how the body heals, how trait variations can be both inherited and influenced by the environment, and how organisms’ body structures can change over millions of years require explanations that connect components, interactions, and mechanisms working across multiple levels (at multiple scales). Traditionally, instructional materials have fragmented these complexities for students by starting instruction with the smallest components of the system or the simplest mechanism first (cells, genotypes, mitosis, or natural selection). In this session, we will show a different approach in which students explore the most directly observable levels and most complex aspects of these phenomena first in service of creating more authentic and accessible opportunities to leverage students’ own experiences and questions. These experiences and questions then lead to developing complex science ideas over time. Participants will explore the anchoring phenomena from three OpenSciEd middle school life science units to see how students’ prior experiences and ideas can be used to generate thoughtful questions about the mechanisms involved that will lead students to uncovering the smaller components, interactions, and mechanisms in the related systems through subsequent investigations.

Takeaways: Participants will explore examples of three life science units that use accessible entry points to support students in making sense of complex biological phenomena.

Speakers

Gail Housman (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Michael Novak (Northwestern University: Evanston, IL), Jamie Deutch Noll (BSCS Science Learning: Colorado Springs, CO), Dawn Novak (Science Educator: Grayslake, IL)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

NSTA 2022 Cells to Genetics.pdf