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2022 Chicago National Conference - Sessions

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Displaying 15 results

Thursday, July 21
8:20 AM - 9:20 AM
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Engaging with Data using CODAP in InquiryHub 3D Storylined Biology

McCormick Place - W196a

Analyzing and interpreting data and using mathematical and computational reasoning are complex at the high school level, which requires students to employ correlational and causational thinking while manipulating visualizations using tools. CODAP, a product of the Concord Consortium, is designed to give students access to these powerful practices with minimal software requirements and with a mission to make data literacy accessible for all students. InquiryHub uses CODAP to provide students with agency because they can determine the variables of interest, in which to create graphical representations from the same data set. In our free, open-source program, students can work with authentic datasets from the CODAP website, data they gather, or data from professional studies. Inside our storyline instructional sequences, inquiryHub leverages CODAP as students analyze the rainfall on the Serengeti and how it correlates to wildebeest populations. In the session, participants will try out CODAP by adding multiple variables of data to answer the question, “What’s happening to large animals on the Serengeti plain?” and how to apply CODAP in their classroom.

Takeaways: CODAP can be used in many different three-dimensional ways to have students analyze and interpret data to make sense of phenomena while providing student agency.

Speakers

Kerri Wingert (University of Colorado Boulder: Boulder, CO)

Thursday, July 21
9:40 AM - 10:40 AM
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"You Can't Give, What You Don't Have": Preparing future STEM Educators with Sensemaking for Equity

McCormick Place - W193a

Built on the idea that, "you can't give what you don't have" (Heibert, 2018), we have intentionally designed our STEM teacher preparation pathway using the NSTA pillar of sensemaking. The undergraduate STEM major integrates the four pillars of sensemaking across the STEM curriculum and is brought together through a seminar to support culturally sustaining STEM teaching. We will share intentionally designed curricular ideas, investigations across the various fields of study (computer science, engineering, biology, chemistry, and mathematics), field experiences, mentorship and research opportunities for our NSF Noyce Scholars and STEM majors. This will be co-presented with undergraduate students and mentor teachers so participants will get an idea of the collaboration and design across various contexts. As STEM teacher educators, we must design and model sensemaking with supports and scaffolding so that our STEM graduates are confident in designing and revising curriculum that holds sensemaking and culturally sustaining pedagogy at the core (Emdin, 2021; Emdin 2022, Paris, 2012).

Takeaways: Participants will take away specific strategies for designing STEM teacher preparation built on a foundation of sensemaking and culturally responsive pedagogy.

Speakers

Kristin Rainville (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Bonnie Maur (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Sydney Worthen-Jenkins (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT), Nicole Hebert (Sacred Heart University: Fairfield, CT)

Thursday, July 21
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Evaluating STEM Curricula with Equity and Inclusivity in Mind

McCormick Place - W178b

Explore EiE’s curriculum design principles for inclusivity and NSTA’s sensemaking pillars as tools to evaluate curricula for inclusivity and equity.

Takeaways: Participants will leave this session with a framework for evaluating curricula with equity and inclusivity in mind.

Speakers

Diana Christopherson (Museum of Science, Boston: Boston, MA)

Thursday, July 21
4:25 PM - 4:55 PM
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Visual-based science education as see through the eyes of a neurologist

McCormick Place - W185a

I plan to show examples of narrated, evolving images. I plan to show images of neuranatomy. I plan to show the results of a student performance using visual-based teaching. I plan to discuss other tips for effective teaching.

Takeaways: Why students learn more in less time by viewing narrated, evolving images than by reading a textbook.

Speakers

Sheldon Margulies, M.D. (Fascinating Education: Silver Spring, MD)

Friday, July 22
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Engaging students in problem-based learning through environmental innovation challenges

McCormick Place - W195

The Innovate to Mitigate (I2M) project empowers teachers to employ a problem-based learning approach to incorporate climate change education in their classrooms. Teachers, regardless of whether they teach language arts, science, engineering, or math, work with students to identify potential causes of climate change and to develop a prototype as a potential solution. Collaborative student teams, utilizing the various strengths and interests that they bring from diverse backgrounds, design and develop their projects and finally create a competition pitch. I2M provides a structure for teaching climate change throughout the school year, supports students to discuss their developing mitigation ideas with peers across the nation, and provides an outside incentive for them to work towards an end goal. We propose a mini-simulation of the competition experience where teachers, acting as students, participate in the sensemaking promoted by the competition. Teachers read a short article about an aspect of climate change, brainstorm in small groups to propose a solution that mitigates the problem, and discuss mitigation ideas with other workshop attendees. Facilitators present ideas for collaboration among their students and across the hall with other teachers, identify key NGSS integration opportunities, provide examples of student projects, and help teachers think about integrating such a project into their own classrooms.

Takeaways: Teachers will learn how to identify entry points for climate change education that capitalize on student desires to make a difference about climate change, support collaboration, and incorporate three-dimensional sensemaking.

Speakers

Santiago Gasca (TERC: Cambridge, MA), Natalie Stapert (Master Reading Coordinator: Potomac, MD)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Promoting the 5th C-(Citizenship) of 21st Century Skills and CRE into an Inclusive STEAM Classroom

McCormick Place - W176c

The use of inclusive STEAM pedagogy is the forefront of using NRC Framework, Hill’s model, and 21st Century skill in unison for generating a sustainable STEAM curriculum. In this presentation, a demonstration of how to utilize these frameworks into creating project-based learning units that showcase diversity and the embodiment of students seeing diversity in the STEAM careers. The NRC framework will include SEPs for developing and using a model, planning and caring for an investigation, and using mathematical and computational thinking and CCCs of cause and effect, structure and function, and energy and matter. The use of the NRC framework with sensemaking (phenomena, science and engineering practices, student ideas, and science ideas) was the basis for developing a hurricane unit for 6th grade and macromolecule unit for 8th grade. Both of these units are grounded in these frameworks and the 5 C’s (communication, critical thinking, collaboration, creativity, citizenship) and the Hill’s model for cultural and historical education (CRE). All these frameworks are woven together on the Hill model lesson plan template to create hands-on PBL for the students. This presentation will give both STE(A)M and science teachers ideas on how to create a curriculum that incorporates more inclusivity and diversity while showcasing the work of my students.

Takeaways: How to create a lesson that incorporates the 5 C's, CRE, SEPs, CCCs, and sense making into a lesson.

Speakers

Jenniffer Stetler (Chamblee Middle School: Chamblee, GA)

Friday, July 22
10:40 AM - 11:40 AM
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Speed Sharing: Creating a High School Classroom Culture That Supports Student Sensemaking

McCormick Place - W196c

Join the members of the NSTA High School Committee as they share how they incorporate sensemaking into their classrooms and learn how to implement these best practices within your own classroom. A roundtable discussion will follow.

Takeaways: 1. High school science sensemaking discussion; 2. Implementation strategies of sensemaking; and 3. Networking with other high school teachers.

Speakers

Ruth Hutson (Blue Valley High/Middle School: Randolph, KS)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Effectivenesss of Integration of Visual Representations Used in Middle School Biology Textbooks in Enhancing Sensemaking Among Students

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 20

The goal of the study was to compare how visual representations were integrated into the content of middle school life science textbooks.

Takeaways: While most of the visual representations are completely linked and related to the content, there is still some room for improvement in making them more complementary than explanatory, which has added benefits.

Speakers

Mary Nyaema (University of Illinois Chicago: Chicago, IL)

Friday, July 22
11:50 AM - 12:50 PM
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Teaching Sustainable Agriculture with Tinkergardens

McCormick Place - Exhibit Hall, Poster Session Area, Table 16

Tinkergardens are STEM focused learning environments that increase student engagement through the design of garden systems and the production of hyper local produce.

Takeaways: Tinkergardens provide a way to integrate engineering into science classrooms and increase student engagement in STEM.

Speakers

Meghan Hess Shamdasani (South Tech Academy: Boynton Beach, FL)

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Getting Carried Away: The UpLab

McCormick Place - W176a

Using the Dual Range Force Sensor, participants will determine how many helium balloons are needed to lift themselves and the house from Disney’s film Up.

Takeaways: 1. Using the phenomenon of the helium balloon lifted house from the movie "Up," attendees will leave with a lab using the Dual Range Force Sensor to determine the amount of balloons needed to lift themselves and the house; and 2. the session will show how this can be used for any level of student, and as a bonus will also incorporate how the data collection and analysis can be collected using Python coding.

Speakers

Todd Graba (Crystal Lake South High School: Crystal Lake, IL), Brad Posnanski (Comsewogue High School: Port Jefferson Station, NY)

Presenter Materials for this Session:
(Please login with your NSTA account to view the materials)

Presentation

Friday, July 22
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Transforming Teaching Through Curriculum-Based Professional Learning

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Carnegie Corporation of New York released a challenge paper calling on the education field to transform teaching and learning through the elements and essentials of curriculum-based professional learning. Learn how schools and systems are helping teachers experience the instruction their students experience to help change instructional practices, leading to better student outcomes.

Takeaways: 1. Explore the rationale for a challenge paper dedicated solely to the issue of curriculum-based professional learning; 2. Discover the 10 elements and three essentials of professional learning critical to effective implementation of high-quality science instructional materials; and 3. Consider implications of the roles and responsibilities for putting into action the elements of curriculum-based professional learning.

Speakers

Jim Short (Carnegie Corporation of New York: New York, NY)

Friday, July 22
3:40 PM - 4:40 PM
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A River Story: Designing STEM Learning Experiences in an Equitable Context for Young Learners with Diverse Backgrounds

McCormick Place - W184b-c

Dive into (equitable) three-dimensional learning and promote STEM teaching and sensemaking strategies that place equity at the center of learning, making science connections to local context.

Takeaways: Explore how placing equity at the center of STEM education changed teacher attitudes about science teaching and learning, developed supportive networks for formal and informal educators to advance science education, created opportunities for teachers to design three-dimensional learning experiences, and provided equitable opportunities for students and families in an urban high-needs district.

Speakers

Elizabeth Nunez (New Brunswick Public Schools: New Brunswick, NJ), Sarah Sterling-Laldee (Paterson Public Schools: Paterson, NJ), Ashley Delgado-D'Amore (Lord Stirling Community School: New Brunswick, NJ), Grace Lugo (New Brunswick Public Schools: New Brunswick, NJ)

Saturday, July 23
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
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Phenomenal STEM: Finding Authentic Problems to Solve in the K–8 Classroom

McCormick Place - Skyline W375a

Are identifying and choosing relevant, authentic problems to put in front of your students holding you back from providing opportunities to engage your students in engineering design? In this workshop, gain insight into what makes a problem instructionally productive. We’ll also explore resources available to support you in selecting problems to put in front of your students and strategies to help students identify problems they want to pursue individually or in small groups for STEM competitions or their own interests.

Takeaways: Explore authentic problems to solve in your STEM classrooms.

Speakers

Michelle Phillips (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Saturday, July 23
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Ignite Your Professional Teaching Practice with NSTA’s Trilogy of Three-Dimensional Resources

McCormick Place - Skyline W375c

Join us as we explore how NSTA’s three-dimensional resources can be utilized to enhance your teaching. Walk away with effective strategies for science teaching and learning and hear from educators as they provide tips for using these resources.

Takeaways: 1. Hear from classroom teachers about how they are using NSTA Press publications; 2. Learn how to use NSTA resources to shift your practice ; 3. Leave with top-notch teaching tips and innovative lesson plan ideas that promote imaginative learning and student engagement; and 4. Leave with strategies to use in your classroom to promote student engagement in science learning.

Speakers

Christine Anne Royce (Shippensburg University: Shippensburg, PA), Wendy Binder (NSTA: Arlington, VA)

Saturday, July 23
2:20 PM - 3:20 PM
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Going Beneath the Surface: Using socioscientific issues to help students engage in 3D learning.

McCormick Place - W185a

Socioscientific issues are scientific topics that require students to engage in meaningful discussions (Zeidler & Nichols, 2009). Additionally, engaging students in socioscientific issues can promote equity, diversity, and help students question biases (Goldsmith et al., 2021). Importantly, these issues are often most likely to promote inclusivity if students have a connection with them. Considering we live in the Midwest, we often use socioscientific issues surrounding agricultural practices. We start with a phenomenon that introduces the example socioscientific issue by showing a video about tilling. We then ask, “Should farmers till the land?” To explore this question, we engage participants by jigsawing four different hands-on activities related to the soil. Participants will explore compact vs. loose soil, reducing water erosion, reducing erosion caused by wind and snow, and the effect of a heat lamp on the temperature of soil. Participants will use science and engineering practices such as planning and carrying out investigations and analyzing and interpreting data. We will debrief the activities and model how we help students make sense of the science ideas. We will finish the presentation by discussing how to find suitable socioscientific issues, include culturally responsive teaching practices, and provide some strategies for integrating with the NGSS.

Takeaways: Participants will learn about how to use socioscientific issues and culturally responsive practices to engage students with social issues that require scientific knowledge.

Speakers

Jesse Wilcox (University of Northern Iowa: Cedar Falls, IA)